5

My problem is very much like this one. I run the simplest CUDA program but the kernel doesn't launch. However, I am sure that my CUDA installation is ok, since I can run complicated CUDA projects consisting of several files (which I took from someone else) with no problems. In these projects, compilation and linking is done through makefiles with a lot of flags. I think the problem is in the correct flags to use while compiling. I simply use a command like this: nvcc -arch=sm_20 -lcudart test.cu with a such a program (to run on a linux machine):

 __global__ void myKernel() 
{ 

    cuPrintf("Hello, world from the device!\n"); 


} 
int main() 
{ 
    cudaPrintfInit(); 
    myKernel<<<1,10>>>(); 
    cudaPrintfDisplay(stdout, true);    
    cudaPrintfEnd(); 
} 

The program compiles correctly. When I add cudaMemcpy() operations, it returns no error. Any suggestion on why the kernel doesn't launch ?

  • 1
    I believe that for devices of compute capability 2.0 or higher you can simply call printf. And you might want to do some error checking to see if you get any error messages from your calls. – Bart Aug 28 '12 at 17:21
  • See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/6565759/… – Paul R Aug 28 '12 at 17:22
  • 1
    Also take note of the first comment in the question you linked to: stackoverflow.com/questions/9519272/cuda-kernel-not-launching - your code above has absolutely no error checking - those functions return a status for a reason, you know. – Paul R Aug 28 '12 at 17:28
  • @Bart Ok, I now use printf, and removed all cudaPrinf stuff, and the kernel has not yet printed! – Tarek Aug 28 '12 at 17:30
3

Are you sure that your CUDA device supports the SM_20 architecture?

Remove the arch= option from your nvcc command line and rebuild everything. This compiles for the 1.0 CUDA architecture, which will be supported on all CUDA devices. If it still doesn't run, do a build clean and make sure there are no object files left anywhere. Then rebuild and run.

Also, arch= refers to the virtual architecture, which should be something like compute_10. sm_20 is the real architecture and I believe should be used with the code= switch, not arch=.

  • Thanks. I removed it and the kernel printed finally using cuPrintf. – Tarek Aug 28 '12 at 17:33
  • I now remembered that I had to use '-arch=sm_20' in the first place because I perform atomicAdd operations on float variables, and this can't be done with sm_10. Is there any alternative ? – Tarek Aug 28 '12 at 17:58
  • 2
    Find out what your hardware is capable of. It's difficult to run code that your hardware doesn't support. ;> – dthorpe Aug 28 '12 at 18:14
12

The reason it is not printing when using printf is that kernel launches are asynchronous and your program is exiting before the printf buffer gets flushed. Section B.16 of the CUDA (5.0) C Programming Guide explains this.

The output buffer for printf() is set to a fixed size before kernel launch (see Associated Host-Side API). It is circular and if more output is produced during kernel execution than can fit in the buffer, older output is overwritten. It is flushed only when one of these actions is performed:

  • Kernel launch via <<<>>> or cuLaunchKernel() (at the start of the launch, and if the CUDA_LAUNCH_BLOCKING environment variable is set to 1, at the end of the launch as well),
  • Synchronization via cudaDeviceSynchronize(), cuCtxSynchronize(), cudaStreamSynchronize(), cuStreamSynchronize(), cudaEventSynchronize(), or cuEventSynchronize(),
  • Memory copies via any blocking version of cudaMemcpy*() or cuMemcpy*(),
  • Module loading/unloading via cuModuleLoad() or cuModuleUnload(),
  • Context destruction via cudaDeviceReset() or cuCtxDestroy().

For this reason, this program prints nothing:

#include <stdio.h>

__global__ void myKernel() 
{ 
  printf("Hello, world from the device!\n"); 
} 

int main() 
{ 
  myKernel<<<1,10>>>(); 
} 

But this program prints "Hello, world from the device!\n" ten times.

#include <stdio.h>

__global__ void myKernel() 
{ 
  printf("Hello, world from the device!\n"); 
} 

int main() 
{ 
  myKernel<<<1,10>>>(); 
  cudaDeviceSynchronize();
} 
  • 1
    cudaPrintfDisplay implicitly synchronizes the context, so that isn´t the problem in the original code. – talonmies Aug 29 '12 at 2:08
  • Thanks, I removed the last line from my answer so it no longer indicates otherwise. – harrism Aug 29 '12 at 3:19
0

In Visual Studio:

Right click on your project > Properies > Cuda C/C++ > Device

and add then following to Code Generation field

compute_30,sm_30;compute_35,sm_35;compute_37,sm_37;compute_50,sm_50;compute_52,sm_52;compute_60,sm_60;compute_61,sm_61;compute_70,sm_70;compute_75,sm_75;

generating code for all these architecture makes your code a bit slower. So eliminate one by one to find which compute and sm gen code is required for your GPU. But if you are shipping this to others better include all of these.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.