14

Is there a way to build e.g. (853467 * 21660421200929) % 100000000000007 without BigInteger libraries (note that each number fits into a 64 bit integer but the multiplication result does not)?

This solution seems inefficient:

int64_t mulmod(int64_t a, int64_t b, int64_t m) {
    if (b < a)
        std::swap(a, b);
    int64_t res = 0;
    for (int64_t i = 0; i < a; i++) {
        res += b;
        res %= m;
    }
    return res;
}
9
  • For one thing, I'd recommend getting rid of the Microsoft extensions and using int64_t.
    – chris
    Aug 28 '12 at 22:29
  • It looks like in this case you could cheat because you don't care about anything greater than parameter __int64 m (or uint64_t for those that favor it) hence you could deal only with 64-bit types.
    – MartyE
    Aug 28 '12 at 22:29
  • 1
    Have you read about the Montgomery reduction algorithm?
    – ildjarn
    Aug 28 '12 at 22:31
  • @ildjarn: No, didn't know about it, thanks for the link! Aug 28 '12 at 22:34
  • 2
    Funny, this would be trivial in x64 assembly.
    – harold
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:01
23

You should use Russian Peasant multiplication. It uses repeated doubling to compute all the values (b*2^i)%m, and adds them in if the ith bit of a is set.

uint64_t mulmod(uint64_t a, uint64_t b, uint64_t m) {
    int64_t res = 0;
    while (a != 0) {
        if (a & 1) res = (res + b) % m;
        a >>= 1;
        b = (b << 1) % m;
    }
    return res;
}

It improves upon your algorithm because it takes O(log(a)) time, not O(a) time.

Caveats: unsigned, and works only if m is 63 bits or less.

1
  • Should res be declared uint64_t? Oct 18 '21 at 20:15
20

Keith Randall's answer is good, but as he said, a caveat is that it works only if m is 63 bits or less.

Here is a modification which has two advantages:

  1. It works even if m is 64 bits.
  2. It doesn't need to use the modulo operation, which can be expensive on some processors.

(Note that the res -= m and temp_b -= m lines rely on 64-bit unsigned integer overflow in order to give the expected results. This should be fine since unsigned integer overflow is well-defined in C and C++. For this reason it's important to use unsigned integer types.)

uint64_t mulmod(uint64_t a, uint64_t b, uint64_t m) {
    uint64_t res = 0;
    uint64_t temp_b;

    /* Only needed if b may be >= m */
    if (b >= m) {
        if (m > UINT64_MAX / 2u)
            b -= m;
        else
            b %= m;
    }

    while (a != 0) {
        if (a & 1) {
            /* Add b to res, modulo m, without overflow */
            if (b >= m - res) /* Equiv to if (res + b >= m), without overflow */
                res -= m;
            res += b;
        }
        a >>= 1;

        /* Double b, modulo m */
        temp_b = b;
        if (b >= m - b)       /* Equiv to if (2 * b >= m), without overflow */
            temp_b -= m;
        b += temp_b;
    }
    return res;
}
4
  • 4
    I like this, since it handles full 64 bit values. If you test whether b < a at the top, and if so, swap a and b, it can significantly speed up the time since it's more likely the while loop can exit early. Dec 21 '15 at 16:04
  • Why can't you do b %= m if m>UINT64_MAX / 2u? Does modulo operation magically becomes unstable?
    – Adrian
    Feb 22 '19 at 17:52
  • You can definitely do b %= m. But, modulo operations can be slow (depending on the processor) so are worth avoiding if possible. So, if (m > UINT64_MAX / 2u) b -= m; is a possible optimisation to avoid a modulo operation in the case that m is large, so the modulo can be simplified down to a simple subtraction. Feb 23 '19 at 20:12
  • Might be a tad late with this comment, but the res += b and b += temp_b do also overflow, which is not mentioned in your answer, even though the -= operations are specifically mentioned. Not from a C++ background, so I'm not sure if this is standard behaviour, but maybe add that in your answer?
    – Bram
    Sep 15 '20 at 21:40
4

Both methods work for me. The first one is the same as yours, but I changed your numbers to excplicit ULL. Second one uses assembler notation, which should work faster. There are also algorithms used in cryptography (RSA and RSA based cryptography mostly I guess), like already mentioned Montgomery reduction as well, but I think it will take time to implement them.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

__uint64_t mulmod1(__uint64_t a, __uint64_t b, __uint64_t m) {
  if (b < a)
    std::swap(a, b);
  __uint64_t res = 0;
  for (__uint64_t i = 0; i < a; i++) {
    res += b;
    res %= m;
  }
  return res;
}

__uint64_t mulmod2(__uint64_t a, __uint64_t b, __uint64_t m) {
  __uint64_t r;
  __asm__
  ( "mulq %2\n\t"
      "divq %3"
      : "=&d" (r), "+%a" (a)
      : "rm" (b), "rm" (m)
      : "cc"
  );
  return r;
}

int main() {
  using namespace std;
  __uint64_t a = 853467ULL;
  __uint64_t b = 21660421200929ULL;
  __uint64_t c = 100000000000007ULL;

  cout << mulmod1(a, b, c) << endl;
  cout << mulmod2(a, b, c) << endl;
  return 0;
}
8
  • I don't know about inline assembler, does it also use a loop? Aug 28 '12 at 22:55
  • 1
    @ChristianAmmer no and it doesn't need one. It uses a double-width multiplication and division is always double-width. It's only in high level languages that the high part of the multiplication suddenly gets lost.
    – harold
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:04
  • 1
    This is OK for the example, but if (a * b > (2^64 - 1) * c) it will fail. But I assume the OP means that the implied quotient is a 64-bit value as well.
    – Brett Hale
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:21
  • About loop: I don't know how assembler calculates the multiplication,I mean under the hoos, but on C++ there is no need for a loop, because due to %uint64 we know, that the result is 64bits at most. @Brett 3 numers are 64bit.
    – Benjamin
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:28
  • @Benjamin - I'm just pointing out that the assembly implementation isn't general. Try: a=8534670000000000000, b=216604212009290. Both are 64-bit, but divq will result in an exception.
    – Brett Hale
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:38
4

An improvement to the repeating doubling algorithm is to check how many bits at once can be calculated without an overflow. An early exit check can be done for both arguments -- speeding up the (unlikely?) event of N not being prime.

e.g. 100000000000007 == 0x00005af3107a4007, which allows 16 (or 17) bits to be calculated per each iteration. The actual number of iterations will be 3 with the example.

// just a conceptual routine
int get_leading_zeroes(uint64_t n)
{
   int a=0;
   while ((n & 0x8000000000000000) == 0) { a++; n<<=1; }
   return a;
}

uint64_t mulmod(uint64_t a, uint64_t b, uint64_t n)
{
     uint64_t result = 0;
     int N = get_leading_zeroes(n);
     uint64_t mask = (1<<N) - 1;
     a %= n;
     b %= n;  // Make sure all values are originally in the proper range?
     // n is not necessarily a prime -- so both a & b can end up being zero
     while (a>0 && b>0)
     {
         result = (result + (b & mask) * a) % n;  // no overflow
         b>>=N;
         a = (a << N) % n;
     }
     return result;
}
1
  • 2
    +1, Nice speed improvement, but would recommend a check for n==0 to prevent an infinite loop in get_leading_zeroes(). Nov 13 '14 at 0:58
3

You could try something that breaks the multiplication up into additions:

// compute (a * b) % m:

unsigned int multmod(unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int m)
{
    unsigned int result = 0;

    a %= m;
    b %= m;

    while (b)
    {
        if (b % 2 != 0)
        {
            result = (result + a) % m;
        }

        a = (a * 2) % m;
        b /= 2;
    }

    return result;
}
4
  • +1 for a working solution, I have to think about it to fully understand, but it works because (a * b) == (a * 2) * (b / 2), right? Aug 28 '12 at 22:49
  • 1
    It will actually fail for some inputs. a * 2 can overflow and be reduced incorrectly if m is bigger than 1 << 63 (or 1 << 31 if ints are 32 bit).
    – harold
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:12
  • You can in fact reduce by (~0ULL/m) in each step. Eg. for 100000000000007, you can use 131072 (1<<17) instead of 2. That also explains harold's comment; for such large m the stepsize becomes 1 and you make no progress.
    – MSalters
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:27
  • @harold: You're right: The first factor must not have its top bit set. I believe that's the only limitation on the function argument values of the present algorithm, though.
    – Kerrek SB
    Aug 29 '12 at 7:30
2

a * b % m equals a * b - (a * b / m) * m

Use floating point arithmetic to approximate a * b / m. The approximation leaves a value small enough for normal 64 bit integer operations, for m up to 63 bits.

This method is limited by the significand of a double, which is usually 52 bits.

uint64_t mod_mul_52(uint64_t a, uint64_t b, uint64_t m) {
    uint64_t c = (double)a * b / m - 1;
    uint64_t d = a * b - c * m;

    return d % m;
}

This method is limited by the significand of a long double, which is usually 64 bits or larger. The integer arithmetic is limited to 63 bits.

uint64_t mod_mul_63(uint64_t a, uint64_t b, uint64_t m) {
    uint64_t c = (long double)a * b / m - 1;
    uint64_t d = a * b - c * m;

    return d % m;
}

These methods require that a and b be less than m. To handle arbitrary a and b, add these lines before c is computed.

a = a % m;
b = b % m;

In both methods, the final % operation could be made conditional.

return d >= m ? d % m : d;
1

I can suggest an improvement for your algorithm.

You actually calculate a * b iteratively by adding each time b, doing modulo after each iteration. It's better to add each time b * x, whereas x is determined so that b * x won't overflow.

int64_t mulmod(int64_t a, int64_t b, int64_t m)
{
    a %= m;
    b %= m;

    int64_t x = 1;
    int64_t bx = b;

    while (x < a)
    {
        int64_t bb = bx * 2;
        if (bb <= bx)
            break; // overflow

        x *= 2;
        bx = bb;
    }

    int64_t ans = 0;

    for (; x < a; a -= x)
        ans = (ans + bx) % m;

    return (ans + a*b) % m;
}
4
  • 1
    Can't you use x=(1<<63-m)/b ? That's rounded down, so b*x <= 1<<63 - m, and it doesn't take a loop to calculate that. Doesn't change big-O, as the number of for-loop iterations decreases by <50%.
    – MSalters
    Aug 28 '12 at 23:39
  • @MSalters: doesn't that introduce a division, which is potentially expensive? Nov 6 '13 at 0:17
  • @CraigMcQueen: Yes, but only one, and there's already a modulo in a loop.
    – MSalters
    Nov 6 '13 at 1:04
  • That's not improvement -- I don't know the O() for the last loop, but taking just 3 "random" numbers the loop ran over 300000 iterations. Feb 20 '14 at 7:48

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