2

NOTICE: this question has a ambiguous concept about 'degree'. and I have got my answer already.

These days I am struggling with a question like below: you can't write a function using some programming language; use RAW SQL only.

Given a table articles which contains 2 columns: article_id and tag_name

article_id  |  tag_name
---------------------------
1              C++
1              java
1              python
2              ruby
2              js
3              ruby
4              java
4              python

and an empty table named 'tag_relations' having a structure like:

tag1     |   tag2    |  degree
-----------------------------------

NOW, the question comes:

  • Write a "RAW SQL" to write values to the table 'tag_relations' according to the first table's content.

For the given data, the output should look like ( I am not sure what the degree is, and the question hasn't mentioned about that, so, both the answers from Gordon Linoff and Jonathan Leffler are correct to me. ) :

tag1     |   tag2    |  degree
-----------------------------------
java         C++        2
java         python     4
ruby         js         2

UPDATED ADDITIONAL info

NOTE 1. Here the 'degree' was not described by the question. However I think it's a measure for the relationships between 2 tags. Since there are values for 'java' and 'C++':

article_id  |  tag_name
---------------------------
1              C++
1              java

so the degree = 2

and for 'java' and 'python'

article_id  |  tag_name
---------------------------
1              java
1              python
4              java
4              python

so the degree = 4

NOTE 2:
There's no record for degrees with: 'python' and 'C++', (I mean this question doesn't refer to the cases that degree < 2) (Note by editor: this comment is inconsistent with including C++ and Java in the output.)

I have spent a day on this question, and reviewed my knowledge on SQL, but still don't know how to store variables or loop the records.

Any idea will be appreciated!

10
  • Why not use a script-like programming language like Python? It would allow you to do some basic looping and conditionals. Plus it is super easy to use Python to execute SQL against a DB.
    – Jesse Webb
    Aug 28, 2012 at 23:06
  • 4
    In the first row of 'tag_relations', are you sure the degree is 2 or what's the degree about? Aug 28, 2012 at 23:27
  • 1
    Firstly -- it's not clear to me how you derived tag_relations from articles. I think you need to explain that -- or, better yet, post pseudocode. Secondly -- re: "still don't know how to store variables or loop the records": Right. SQL doesn't have, or require, either of those features.
    – ruakh
    Aug 28, 2012 at 23:45
  • 3
    Why is there no row for C++ and python in the result? Aug 29, 2012 at 1:21
  • 1
    @SiweiShen: If you are not sure about the result, you really should have mentioned that. Aug 29, 2012 at 1:47

2 Answers 2

6

What is the degree? It appears to be the maximum article id connecting two things.

This query requires a self join (and an insert):

insert into tag_relations(tag1, tag2, degree)
    select a1.tag_name, a2.tag_name, max(article_id) as maxid
    from articles a1 join
         articles a2
         on a1.article_id = a2.article_id and
            a1.tag_name < a2.tag_name
    group by a1.tag_name, a2.tag_name

The self join finds all pairs of items with the same article_id. The "<" just makes sure that reversing the order does not create a new pair. For any pair, the maximum article_id is taken as the new degree.

2
  • Indeed — how is 'degree' calculated is the big mystery in this question. Your solution gets a very similar answer to mine; I used a count of the number of pairs instead of the MAX(a1.article_id) (which would need the a1. tag to avoid 'ambiguous column' errors in most DBMS). You'll generate 4 rows of data instead of 3 from the given data; so does my solution. Aug 29, 2012 at 1:19
  • thanks a lot Gordon! yeah, your answer saved my life, although I don't know what exactly the 'degree' is, but it gives me great inspiration.
    – Siwei
    Aug 29, 2012 at 1:24
3

Since the data in the question is not coherent (or not coherently explained), this answer takes minor liberties with some assumptions that yield plausible looking answers.

Assume that the goal is to list how many times each pair of tags are applied to the same article ID. Given the data:

article_id  |  tag_name
---------------------------
1              c++
1              java
1              python
2              ruby
2              js
3              ruby
4              java
4              python

The expected output might be:

tag1     | tag2    | degree
------------------------------
c++        java      1      -- from 1
java       python    2      -- from 1 and 4
c++        python    1      -- from 1 (missing from question's expected results)
java       ruby      1      -- from 2

The tags are ordered so that tag1 sorts before tag2; this avoids (java, java) appearing, and also prevents (c++, java) appearing along with (java, c++).

Given all this interpretation of the question, we need to develop a query to select the data, and then append that to INSERT INTO tag_relations.

SELECT a.article_id, a.tag_name AS tag1, b.tag_name AS tag2
  FROM articles AS a
  JOIN articles AS b ON a.article_id = b.article_id AND a.tag_name < b.tag_name;

The key concept here is the 'self-join'. The table articles is used twice in the query (and is given two different aliases to clarify which is which), and the table is joined with itself. The details of the join here is quite a common pattern; equality on some columns, but an inequality on one or more others. If there are several columns to order by, the ordering condition gets tricky. Sometimes, that will be a <= instead of <.

This gives the output:

1    c++      java
1    c++      python
1    java     python
2    js       ruby
4    java     python

Now we just need to summarize that with a COUNT for the degree:

SELECT a.tag_name AS tag1, b.tag_name AS tag2, COUNT(*) AS degree
  FROM articles AS a
  JOIN articles AS b ON a.article_id = b.article_id AND a.tag_name < b.tag_name
 GROUP BY tag1, tag2;

If you want to count the reverse relations as well as the forward relations, then you can multiply the count by 2; that would get closer to your expected data.

Finally inserting the data, we get:

INSERT INTO tag_relations(tag1, tag2, degree)
    SELECT a.tag_name AS tag1, b.tag_name AS tag2, COUNT(*) AS degree
      FROM articles AS a
      JOIN articles AS b ON a.article_id = b.article_id AND a.tag_name < b.tag_name
     GROUP BY tag1, tag2;
7
  • thank you very much! sorry I can't give all of you as the accept answer, but your answer does also give me great inspiration and a good sample to learn!
    – Siwei
    Aug 29, 2012 at 1:25
  • It's a given that you can only accept one answer; Gordon got there first and has pretty much the equivalent answer to mine, so he should get the acceptance. Aug 29, 2012 at 1:26
  • Gordon has used MAX(), you used COUNT(), so the two answers are not the same (and from what I read not even the OP knows what should the answer be). Aug 29, 2012 at 1:39
  • @ypercube: yes; the question is at best ambiguous about what the degree column should be. The size of the result set for the given data is also in question — I've added an editorial note that the assertion that 'C++ and Python should not appear' is self-consistent with 'C++ and Java should appear'. It is frustrating when you have to make so many guesses about what the answer should be, but both answers use the same 'self-join' technique and have given the OP some light at the end of the tunnel. Aug 29, 2012 at 1:42
  • Yeah, but still your answer makes a bit more sense as it doesn't use the (meaningless) surrogate key. Aug 29, 2012 at 1:45

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