How can you debug CORS requests using cURL? So far I couldn't find any way to "simulate" the preflight request .

up vote 344 down vote accepted

Here's how you can debug CORS requests using curl.

Sending a regular CORS request using cUrl:

curl -H "Origin: http://example.com" --verbose \
  https://www.googleapis.com/discovery/v1/apis?fields=

The -H "Origin: http://example.com" flag is the third party domain making the request. Substitute in whatever your domain is.

The --verbose flag prints out the entire response so you can see the request and response headers.

The url I'm using above is a sample request to a Google API that supports CORS, but you can substitute in whatever url you are testing.

The response should include the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header.

Sending a preflight request using cUrl:

curl -H "Origin: http://example.com" \
  -H "Access-Control-Request-Method: POST" \
  -H "Access-Control-Request-Headers: X-Requested-With" \
  -X OPTIONS --verbose \
  https://www.googleapis.com/discovery/v1/apis?fields=

This looks similar to the regular CORS request with a few additions:

The -H flags send additional preflight request headers to the server

The -X OPTIONS flag indicates that this is an HTTP OPTIONS request.

If the preflight request is successful, the response should include the Access-Control-Allow-Origin, Access-Control-Allow-Methods, and Access-Control-Allow-Headers response headers. If the preflight request was not successful, these headers shouldn't appear, or the HTTP response won't be 200.

You can also specify additional headers, such as User-Agent, by using the -H flag.

  • 2
    that page does not seem to return any CORS headers, is that correct? – Janus Troelsen Feb 24 '13 at 20:01
  • 1
    In order to view the actual headers, you need to add the --verbose option, as mentioned above. – monsur Feb 25 '13 at 14:24
  • 6
    or --head: curl -H "Origin: http://example.com" --head https://www.googleapis.com/discovery/v1/apis\?fields\= – John Bachir Apr 6 '14 at 5:30
  • 2
    Use --include to see the headers. – Mika Tuupola Feb 18 '16 at 16:18
  • 5
    In the case of S3, the according headers are only added if the proper method is given, you can do so by using curl -H "Access-Control-Request-Method: GET" -H "Origin: http://example.com" -I https://s3.amazonaws.com/your-bucket/file. – Joscha Mar 2 '16 at 2:13

Updated answer that covers most cases

curl -H "Access-Control-Request-Method: GET" -H "Origin: http://localhost" --head http://www.example.com/
  1. Replace http://localhost with URL you want to test.
  2. If response includes Access-Control-Allow-* then your resource supports CORS.

Rationale for alternative answer

I google this question every now and then and the accepted answer is never what I need. First it prints response body which is a lot of text. Adding ---head outputs only headers. Second when testing S3 URLs we need to provide additional header -H "Access-Control-Request-Method: GET".

Hope this will save time.

  • 1
    Thanks! works as hell. – Sid Feb 2 at 11:14
  • 1
    if I curl without setting origin and I can get response and headers(including access-control-allow-origin header) back, does that mean I set up my CORS incorrectly? curl -X GET 'endpoint.com'; -H 'Cache-Control: no-cache' --head – Jun Jul 13 at 0:23
  • figuring the same @Jun – EnchanterIO Jul 31 at 15:20

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