44

I'm new to Python, and I just made a game and a menu in Python. Question is, that using (raw_)input() requires me to press enter after every keypress, I'd like to make it so that pressing down-arrow will instantly select the next menu item, or move down in the game. At the moment, it requires me to like type "down" and then hit enter. I also did quite a lot of research, but I would prefer not to download huge modules (e.g. pygame) just to achieve a single keyDown() method. So are there any easier ways, which I just couldn't find?

Edit: Just found out that msvcrt.getch() would do the trick. It's not keyDown(), but it works. However, I'm not sure how to use it either, it seems quite weird, any help here? This is what I got at the moment:

from msvcrt import getch
while True:
    key = getch()
    print(key)

However, it keeps giving me all these nonsense bytes, for example, down-arrow is this:

b'\xe0'
b'P'

And I have no idea how to use them, I've tried to compare with chr() and even use ord() but can't really do any comparisons. What I'm trying to do is basically this:

from msvcrt import getch
while True:
    key = getch()
    if key == escape:
        break
    elif key == downarrow:
        movedown()
    elif key == 'a':
        ...

And so on... Any help?

  • Not a duplicate of that. This is about keydown events, not single character input. – Deestan Aug 29 '12 at 10:48
  • 8
    I can haz cross-platform solution?? msvcrt is not available on mac/linux distributions of Python – cat Jan 11 '16 at 13:54
59

Figured it out by testing all the stuff by myself. Couldn't find any topics about it tho, so I'll just leave the solution here. This might not be the only or even the best solution, but it works for my purposes (within getch's limits) and is better than nothing.

Note: proper keyDown() which would recognize all the keys and actual key presses, is still valued.

Solution: using ord()-function to first turn the getch() into an integer (I guess they're virtual key codes, but not too sure) works fine, and then comparing the result to the actual number representing the wanted key. Also, if I needed to, I could add an extra chr() around the number returned so that it would convert it to a character. However, I'm using mostly down arrow, esc, etc. so converting those to a character would be stupid. Here's the final code:

from msvcrt import getch
while True:
    key = ord(getch())
    if key == 27: #ESC
        break
    elif key == 13: #Enter
        select()
    elif key == 224: #Special keys (arrows, f keys, ins, del, etc.)
        key = ord(getch())
        if key == 80: #Down arrow
            moveDown()
        elif key == 72: #Up arrow
            moveUp()

Also if someone else needs to, you can easily find out the keycodes from google, or by using python and just pressing the key:

from msvcrt import getch
while True:
    print(ord(getch()))
  • 3
    Thank you, this was the first answer that worked for me. +1 – joe_young Feb 15 '15 at 9:43
  • 1
    I am using the above code, but my code simply blocks at getch(), and nothing happens then. any help ? – Anum Sheraz May 9 '16 at 18:48
  • 3
    @AnumSheraz The above method only works when you run the code from command prompt. – Moondra May 27 '17 at 15:32
  • 1
    if you cast a char to bytes first you can compare directly with keypressed 'keypressed == bytes('q', 'utf-8')' checks if q was pressed. It will work for special keys like enter or esc but you need to know the codes for those (esc is '\x1b' for example) – Xitcod13 May 24 '18 at 3:13
10

See the MSDN getch docs. Specifically:

The _getch and_getwch functions read a single character from the console without echoing the character. None of these functions can be used to read CTRL+C. When reading a function key or an arrow key, each function must be called twice; the first call returns 0 or 0xE0, and the second call returns the actual key code.

The Python function returns a character. you can use ord() to get an integer value you can test, for example keycode = ord(msvcrt.getch()).

So if you read an 0x00 or 0xE0, read it a second time to get the key code for an arrow or function key. From experimentation, 0x00 precedes F1-F10 (0x3B-0x44) and 0xE0 precedes arrow keys and Ins/Del/Home/End/PageUp/PageDown.

  • Well I figured it by now, but can't post the final solution. But this + ord() + char() – user1632861 Aug 29 '12 at 13:26
1
from msvcrt import getch

pos = [0, 0]

def fright():
    global pos
    pos[0] += 1

def fleft():
    global pos 
    pos[0] -= 1

def fup():
    global pos
    pos[1] += 1

def fdown():
    global pos
    pos[1] -= 1

while True:
    print'Distance from zero: ', pos
    key = ord(getch())
    if key == 27: #ESC
        break
    elif key == 13: #Enter
        print('selected')
    elif key == 32: #Space
        print('jump')
    elif key == 224: #Special keys (arrows, f keys, ins, del, etc.)
        key = ord(getch())
        if key == 80: #Down arrow
            print('down')
            fdown
        elif key == 72: #Up arrow
            print('up')
            fup()
        elif key == 75: #Left arrow
            print('left')
            fleft()
        elif key == 77: #Right arrow
            print('right')
            fright()
  • 2
    Please add some explanation to your answer to explain your code. – AJ123 Nov 3 '17 at 16:49
1

I really did not want to post this as a comment because I would need to comment all answers and the original question.

All of the answers seem to rely on MSVCRT Microsoft Visual C Runtime. If you would like to avoid that dependency :

In case you want cross platform support, using the library here:

https://pypi.org/project/getkey/#files

https://github.com/kcsaff/getkey

Can allow for a more elegant solution.

Code example:

from getkey import getkey, keys
key = getkey()
if key == keys.UP:
  ...  # Handle the UP key
elif key == keys.DOWN:
  ...  # Handle the DOWN key
elif key == 'a':
  ...  # Handle the `a` key
elif key == 'Y':
  ...  # Handle `shift-y`
else:
  # Handle other text characters
  buffer += key
  print(buffer)

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