List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
list.add("a");
...
list.add("z");

synchronized(list) {
    Iterator<String> i = list.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()) {
        ...
    }
}

and

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
list.add("a");
...
list.add("z");

List<String> synchronizedList = Collections.synchronizedList(list);

synchronized(synchronizedList) {
    Iterator<String> i = synchronizedList.iterator();
    while(i.hasNext()) {
        ...
    }
}

Specifically, I'm not clear as to why synchronized is required in the second instance when a synchronized list provides thread-safe access to the list.

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you don't lock around the iteration, you will get a ConcurrentModificationException if another thread modifies it during the loop.

Synchronizing all of the methods doesn't prevent that in the slightest.

This (and many other things) is why Collections.synchronized* is completely useless.
You should use the classes in java.util.concurrent. (and you should think carefully about how you will guarantee you will be safe)

As a general rule of thumb:

Slapping locks around every method is not enough to make something thread-safe.

For much more information, see my blog

  • Ah, so basically a synchronized list just bombs if more than one thread tries to modify it. It doesn't really protect you in any fashion other than letting you know that more than one thread is trying to access the list? – Vivin Paliath Aug 29 '12 at 16:08
  • 2
    @VivinPaliath: The synchronizedList will make sure that calling individual methods won't break the collection by racing against each-other. It doesn't help you make sure that your structure is safe. – SLaks Aug 29 '12 at 16:09
  • 5
    +1 except synchronizedList() is not completely useless, it's just not usually a complete solution. – Mike Tunnicliffe Aug 29 '12 at 16:11
  • 1
    @fd.: If you use synchronizedList(), you will either need to provide higher-level synchronization (which means you would have enough of your own locks that you won't need it), or you will have race conditions. – SLaks Aug 29 '12 at 16:16
  • 1
    @SLaksL: My point is the reflection of that - if you don't use synchronizedList() you will need to implement the locking that synchronizedList() provides, in addition to the other locking you will need. But I agree that you really need to think about the locking needed and not use conveniences like synchronizedList as a crutch. – Mike Tunnicliffe Aug 29 '12 at 16:24

synchronizedList only makes each call atomic. In your case, the loop make multiple calls so between each call/iteration another thread can modify the list. If you use one of the concurrent collections, you don't have this problem.

To see how this collection differs from ArrayList.

List<String> list = new CopyOnWriteArrayList<String>();
list.addAll(Arrays.asList("a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,z".split(",")));

for(String s: list) {
    System.out.print(s+" ");
    // would trigger a ConcurrentModifcationException with ArrayList
    list.clear(); 
}

Even though the list is cleared repeatedly, it prints the following because that wa the contents when the iterator was created.

a b c d e f g h z 
  • So when you use one of the collections from java.util.concurrent you don't need to explicitly place a lock on the list at all? Just want to make I'm following right... – Windle Aug 29 '12 at 16:27
  • 1
    @Windle No you don't, the iteration will be done on the list as it was when the iteration started - any changes made to the list during the iteration will be ignored (in your iteration). – assylias Aug 29 '12 at 16:31
  • 1
    For the concurrency collections, there is no access to any locks, if it uses one. You couldn't lock it if you wanted to, but you shouldn't need to. ;) – Peter Lawrey Aug 29 '12 at 16:32
  • @Windle Added an example. – Peter Lawrey Aug 29 '12 at 16:35
  • @PeterLawrey Arrays.asList("a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,z".split(",")) That's the laziest thing I have ever seen! ;-) – assylias Aug 29 '12 at 16:40

The second code needs to be synchronized because of the way synchronized lists are implemented. This is explained in the javadoc:

It is imperative that the user manually synchronize on the returned list when iterating over it

The main difference between the two code snippets is the effect of the add operations:

  • with the synchronized list, you have a visibility guarantee: other threads will see the newly added items if they call synchronizedList.get(..) for example.
  • with the ArrayList, other threads might not see the newly added items immediately - they might actually not ever see them.
  • +1 for pointing out the visibility guarantee of synchronized – Mike Tunnicliffe Aug 29 '12 at 16:26

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.