5

I have looked and I know there are other answers out there but none of them seem to give me what i'm looking for so please don't report this as a "repost"

I'm getting the unresolved external symbol "public: __thiscall" error in my C++ code and i'm about to kick it out the window and just fail my C++ class. Please help me!!!!

My checking account header file

#include "BankAccount.h"
class CheckingAccount
{
private:
int numOfWithdrawls;
double serviceFee;
int AccountBal;

public:
bool withdraw (double wAmmt);
BankAccount CA;
CheckingAccount();
CheckingAccount(int accountNum);
};

and its CPP file

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#include "CheckingAccount.h"

CheckingAccount::CheckingAccount()
{
CA;
numOfWithdrawls = 0;
serviceFee = .50;
}
CheckingAccount::CheckingAccount(int accountNum)
{
CA.setAcctNum (accountNum);
numOfWithdrawls = 0;
serviceFee = .50;
}
bool CheckingAccount::withdraw (double wAmmt)
{
numOfWithdrawls++;
if (numOfWithdrawls < 3)
{
    CA.withdraw(wAmmt);
}
else
{
    if (CA.getAcctBal() + .50 <=0)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        CA.withdraw(wAmmt + .50);
        return 1;
    }
}
}

My BankAccount header file

#ifndef BankAccount_h
#define BankAccount_h
class BankAccount
{
private:
int acctNum;
double acctBal;

public:
BankAccount();
BankAccount(int AccountNumber);
bool setAcctNum(int aNum);
int getAcctNum();
double getAcctBal();
bool deposit(double dAmmt);
bool withdraw(double wAmmt);
};
#endif

My BankAccount CPP file

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#include "BankAccount.h"

BankAccount::BankAccount(int AccoutNumber)
{
acctNum = 00000;
acctBal = 100.00;
}
bool BankAccount::setAcctNum(int aNum)
{
acctNum = aNum;
return true;
}

int BankAccount::getAcctNum()
{
return acctNum;
}

double BankAccount::getAcctBal()
{
return acctBal;
}

bool BankAccount::deposit(double dAmmt)
{
acctBal += dAmmt;
return true;
}

bool BankAccount::withdraw(double wAmmt)
{
if (acctBal - wAmmt <0)
{
    return 0;
}
else
{
    acctBal -= wAmmt;
    return 1;
}
}

My error:

1>BankAccountMain.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: __thiscall BankAccount::BankAccount(void)" (??0BankAccount@@QAE@XZ) referenced in function "public: __thiscall SavingsAccount::SavingsAccount(void)" (??0SavingsAccount@@QAE@XZ)

1>CheckingAccount.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: __thiscall BankAccount::BankAccount(void)" (??0BankAccount@@QAE@XZ)

closed as too localized by Rob Kennedy, Bo Persson, jogojapan, Mat, Graviton Sep 20 '12 at 3:45

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  • When you see these kinds of errors, make sure you aren't forgetting to link to a LIB file. Sometimes adding the headers is not enough, even for WinAPI stuff. – kayleeFrye_onDeck Sep 21 '17 at 20:34
19

The "__thiscall" is noise. Read on. The error messages are complaining about BankAccount::BankAccount(void). The header file says that BankAccount has a default constructor, but there's no definition for it.

  • @MattWestlake - I know the feeling. There's a lot of information in those error messages, but they're rather dense. – Pete Becker Aug 29 '12 at 18:20
  • Why is MS Studio so cryptic in its error messages? Why the unnecessary noise? – Javier Quevedo Aug 17 '16 at 12:43
  • 1
    @JavierQuevedo-Fernández - because in a different context, the "noise" might matter. There's only so much a compiler can do to generate meaningful error messages. Part of becoming a good programmer is learning to understand error messages. – Pete Becker Aug 17 '16 at 12:54
5

In your BankAccount class you declare a constructor that takes no arguments

 BankAccount();

but you do not implement it. This is why the linker cannot find it. Provide an implementation for this constructor in your .cpp file and the link step should work.

  • I've been looking at code way too long... ugh – Matt Westlake Aug 29 '12 at 18:19
  • @MattWestlake It happens to everyone. In general linker errors usually mean that you have forgotten to implement a function or you have failed to link to the correct library. These are usually the first things to look for. – mathematician1975 Aug 29 '12 at 18:22

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