218

As compared to say:

REPLICATE(@padchar, @len - LEN(@str)) + @str
1
  • I rolled back the last edit. The question gives one way - I was looking for more optimal ways. The edit lost that implication in search of some other quality.
    – Cade Roux
    Commented Mar 19, 2012 at 1:30

21 Answers 21

341

This is simply an inefficient use of SQL, no matter how you do it.

perhaps something like

right('XXXXXXXXXXXX'+ rtrim(@str), @n)

where X is your padding character and @n is the number of characters in the resulting string (assuming you need the padding because you are dealing with a fixed length).

But as I said you should really avoid doing this in your database.

11
  • 3
    There's times where it's needed ... for example, fetching a subset of data for a paged screen.
    – Beep beep
    Commented Sep 21, 2010 at 5:06
  • 8
    +1 Just tested a load of different methods and this was the fastest. You might need to RTRIM(@str) though if that can contain trailing spaces. Commented Apr 3, 2011 at 10:54
  • 1
    +1 Was puzzling over why my char(6) wasn't padding correctly, and the RTRIM on the input variable saved me some head scratching
    – jkelley
    Commented Apr 26, 2011 at 18:16
  • @MartinSmith Thank you... I've been trying to figure out why my string wasn't working and rtrim fixed it. TY.
    – WernerCD
    Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 15:39
  • 4
    This is a great answer. Of course you should avoid doing this when you don't have to, but sometimes it's unavoidable; in my case I don't have the choice to do it in C# due to deployment constraints, and someone stored a franchise number as an INT when it should have been a 5 character numeric string with leading zeros. This helped immensely.
    – Jim
    Commented Apr 18, 2014 at 15:37
66

I know this was originally asked back in 2008, but there are some new functions that were introduced with SQL Server 2012. The FORMAT function simplifies padding left with zeros nicely. It will also perform the conversion for you:

declare @n as int = 2
select FORMAT(@n, 'd10') as padWithZeros

Update:

I wanted to test the actual efficiency of the FORMAT function myself. I was quite surprised to find the efficiency was not very good compared to the original answer from AlexCuse. Although I find the FORMAT function cleaner, it is not very efficient in terms of execution time. The Tally table I used has 64,000 records. Kudos to Martin Smith for pointing out execution time efficiency.

SET STATISTICS TIME ON
select FORMAT(N, 'd10') as padWithZeros from Tally
SET STATISTICS TIME OFF

SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 2157 ms, elapsed time = 2696 ms.

SET STATISTICS TIME ON
select right('0000000000'+ rtrim(cast(N as varchar(5))), 10) from Tally
SET STATISTICS TIME OFF

SQL Server Execution Times:

CPU time = 31 ms, elapsed time = 235 ms.

6
  • 1
    This was exactly what I was looking for. Official help for FORMAT: msdn.microsoft.com/es-MX/library/hh213505.aspx Commented Apr 17, 2015 at 20:40
  • 1
    This applies to SQL Server 2014 onwards according to MSDN and my own experience of trying it on SQL Server 2012.
    – arame3333
    Commented Oct 22, 2015 at 13:54
  • 6
    This will not be the "most efficient" way as asked though. In this example Format takes 180 seconds vs 12 seconds. stackoverflow.com/a/27447244/73226 Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 15:00
  • 3
    It may be "most efficient" in terms of the time taken for the programmer to make use of it! Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 14:25
  • 1
    Given that you specify a decimal format, this notably does not work for other types of strings that do not contain only a single decimal. Notably the question did not ask about string decimal.
    – Kissaki
    Commented Sep 24, 2021 at 7:55
36

Several people gave versions of this:

right('XXXXXXXXXXXX'+ @str, @n)

be careful with that because it will truncate your actual data if it is longer than n.

1
  • 1
    Please write that as a comment to the answers in question. This post lost refers to others but lost the explicit reference and context. Answers should be self-contained answers. Comments and caveats about answer/solutions should be comments on those.
    – Kissaki
    Commented Sep 24, 2021 at 7:57
16
@padstr = REPLICATE(@padchar, @len) -- this can be cached, done only once

SELECT RIGHT(@padstr + @str, @len)
10

Perhaps an over kill I have these UDFs to pad left and right

ALTER   Function [dbo].[fsPadLeft](@var varchar(200),@padChar char(1)='0',@len int)
returns varchar(300)
as
Begin

return replicate(@PadChar,@len-Len(@var))+@var

end

and to right

ALTER function [dbo].[fsPadRight](@var varchar(200),@padchar char(1)='0', @len int) returns varchar(201) as
Begin

--select @padChar=' ',@len=200,@var='hello'


return  @var+replicate(@PadChar,@len-Len(@var))
end
3
  • The only problem with scalar UDFs is that they perform far more poorly than equivalent code inline (plus there's data type issues). Here's to hoping they introduce better scalar UDF performance and/or inline scalar UDFs in a future version.
    – Cade Roux
    Commented Jun 5, 2010 at 22:42
  • If you specify a length less than the length of var, then these functions return null. Wrap each of the replicate statements with an isnull statement to simply return var if the length is less. isnull(replicate(...), '') Commented Mar 27, 2012 at 22:51
  • Adding WITH SCHEMABINDING to the function declaration will improve the efficiency of the user-defined functions. This is something I recommend adding by default to all your functions unless you have a compelling reason to remove it.
    – EricI
    Commented Mar 10, 2015 at 5:05
9

I'm not sure that the method that you give is really inefficient, but an alternate way, as long as it doesn't have to be flexible in the length or padding character, would be (assuming that you want to pad it with "0" to 10 characters:

DECLARE
   @pad_characters VARCHAR(10)

SET @pad_characters = '0000000000'

SELECT RIGHT(@pad_characters + @str, 10)
1
3

I hope this helps someone.

STUFF ( character_expression , start , length ,character_expression )

select stuff(@str, 1, 0, replicate('0', @n - len(@str)))
2

probably overkill, I often use this UDF:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[f_pad_before](@string VARCHAR(255), @desired_length INTEGER, @pad_character CHAR(1))
RETURNS VARCHAR(255) AS  
BEGIN

-- Prefix the required number of spaces to bulk up the string and then replace the spaces with the desired character
 RETURN ltrim(rtrim(
        CASE
          WHEN LEN(@string) < @desired_length
            THEN REPLACE(SPACE(@desired_length - LEN(@string)), ' ', @pad_character) + @string
          ELSE @string
        END
        ))
END

So that you can do things like:

select dbo.f_pad_before('aaa', 10, '_')
2
  • This is actually used in a udf which has to do a few other things to conform some data.
    – Cade Roux
    Commented Sep 23, 2008 at 16:09
  • This also works perfectly if you're combining char and varchar types. Commented Jan 4, 2012 at 21:52
2

I liked vnRocks solution, here it is in the form of a udf

create function PadLeft(
      @String varchar(8000)
     ,@NumChars int
     ,@PadChar char(1) = ' ')
returns varchar(8000)
as
begin
    return stuff(@String, 1, 0, replicate(@PadChar, @NumChars - len(@String)))
end
2

this is a simple way to pad left:

REPLACE(STR(FACT_HEAD.FACT_NO, x, 0), ' ', y)

Where x is the pad number and y is the pad character.

sample:

REPLACE(STR(FACT_HEAD.FACT_NO, 3, 0), ' ', 0)
1
  • You seem to be talking about left padding numbers such that 1 becomes 001. Commented Dec 8, 2010 at 17:12
1
select right(replicate(@padchar, @len) + @str, @len)
1

In SQL Server 2005 and later you could create a CLR function to do this.

1

How about this:

replace((space(3 - len(MyField))

3 is the number of zeros to pad

1
  • This helped me: CONCAT(REPLACE(SPACE(@n - LENGTH(@str)), ' ', '0'), @str)
    – ingham
    Commented Sep 5, 2013 at 8:00
0

I use this one. It allows you to determine the length you want the result to be as well as a default padding character if one is not provided. Of course you can customize the length of the input and output for whatever maximums you are running into.

/*===============================================================
 Author         : Joey Morgan
 Create date    : November 1, 2012
 Description    : Pads the string @MyStr with the character in 
                : @PadChar so all results have the same length
 ================================================================*/
 CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[svfn_AMS_PAD_STRING]
        (
         @MyStr VARCHAR(25),
         @LENGTH INT,
         @PadChar CHAR(1) = NULL
        )
RETURNS VARCHAR(25)
 AS 
      BEGIN
        SET @PadChar = ISNULL(@PadChar, '0');
        DECLARE @Result VARCHAR(25);
        SELECT
            @Result = RIGHT(SUBSTRING(REPLICATE('0', @LENGTH), 1,
                                      (@LENGTH + 1) - LEN(RTRIM(@MyStr)))
                            + RTRIM(@MyStr), @LENGTH)

        RETURN @Result

      END

Your mileage may vary. :-)

Joey Morgan
Programmer/Analyst Principal I
WellPoint Medicaid Business Unit

0

Here's my solution, which avoids truncated strings and uses plain ol' SQL. Thanks to @AlexCuse, @Kevin and @Sklivvz, whose solutions are the foundation of this code.

 --[@charToPadStringWith] is the character you want to pad the string with.
declare @charToPadStringWith char(1) = 'X';

-- Generate a table of values to test with.
declare @stringValues table (RowId int IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, StringValue varchar(max) NULL);
insert into @stringValues (StringValue) values (null), (''), ('_'), ('A'), ('ABCDE'), ('1234567890');

-- Generate a table to store testing results in.
declare @testingResults table (RowId int IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, StringValue varchar(max) NULL, PaddedStringValue varchar(max) NULL);

-- Get the length of the longest string, then pad all strings based on that length.
declare @maxLengthOfPaddedString int = (select MAX(LEN(StringValue)) from @stringValues);
declare @longestStringValue varchar(max) = (select top(1) StringValue from @stringValues where LEN(StringValue) = @maxLengthOfPaddedString);
select [@longestStringValue]=@longestStringValue, [@maxLengthOfPaddedString]=@maxLengthOfPaddedString;

-- Loop through each of the test string values, apply padding to it, and store the results in [@testingResults].
while (1=1)
begin
    declare
        @stringValueRowId int,
        @stringValue varchar(max);

    -- Get the next row in the [@stringLengths] table.
    select top(1) @stringValueRowId = RowId, @stringValue = StringValue
    from @stringValues 
    where RowId > isnull(@stringValueRowId, 0) 
    order by RowId;

    if (@@ROWCOUNT = 0) 
        break;

    -- Here is where the padding magic happens.
    declare @paddedStringValue varchar(max) = RIGHT(REPLICATE(@charToPadStringWith, @maxLengthOfPaddedString) + @stringValue, @maxLengthOfPaddedString);

    -- Added to the list of results.
    insert into @testingResults (StringValue, PaddedStringValue) values (@stringValue, @paddedStringValue);
end

-- Get all of the testing results.
select * from @testingResults;
0

I know this isn't adding much to the conversation at this point but I'm running a file generation procedure and its going incredibly slow. I've been using replicate and saw this trim method and figured I'd give it a shot.

You can see in my code where the switch between the two is in addition to the new @padding variable (and the limitation that now exists). I ran my procedure with the function in both states with the same results in execution time. So at least in SQLServer2016, I'm not seeing any difference in efficiency that other found.

Anyways, here's my UDF that I wrote years ago plus the changes today which is much the same as other's other than it has a LEFT/RIGHT param option and some error checking.

CREATE FUNCTION PadStringTrim 
(
    @inputStr varchar(500), 
    @finalLength int, 
    @padChar varchar (1),
    @padSide varchar(1)
)
RETURNS VARCHAR(500)

AS BEGIN
    -- the point of this function is to avoid using replicate which is extremely slow in SQL Server
    -- to get away from this though we now have a limitation of how much padding we can add, so I've settled on a hundred character pad 
    DECLARE @padding VARCHAR (100) = 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'
    SET @padding = REPLACE(@padding, 'X', @padChar)


    SET @inputStr = RTRIM(LTRIM(@inputStr))

    IF LEN(@inputStr) > @finalLength 
        RETURN '!ERROR!' -- can search for ! in the returned text 

    ELSE IF(@finalLength > LEN(@inputStr))
        IF @padSide = 'L'
            SET @inputStr = RIGHT(@padding + @inputStr, @finalLength)
            --SET @inputStr = REPLICATE(@padChar, @finalLength - LEN(@inputStr)) + @inputStr
        ELSE IF @padSide = 'R'
            SET @inputStr = LEFT(@inputStr + @padding, @finalLength)
            --SET @inputStr = @inputStr + REPLICATE(@padChar, @finalLength - LEN(@inputStr)) 



    -- if LEN(@inputStr) = @finalLength we just return it 
    RETURN @inputStr;
END

-- SELECT  dbo.PadStringTrim( tblAccounts.account, 20, '~' , 'R' ) from tblAccounts
-- SELECT  dbo.PadStringTrim( tblAccounts.account, 20, '~' , 'L' ) from tblAccounts
0

I have one function that lpad with x decimals: CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[LPAD_DEC] ( -- Add the parameters for the function here @pad nvarchar(MAX), @string nvarchar(MAX), @length int, @dec int ) RETURNS nvarchar(max) AS BEGIN -- Declare the return variable here DECLARE @resp nvarchar(max)

IF LEN(@string)=@length
BEGIN
    IF CHARINDEX('.',@string)>0
    BEGIN
        SELECT @resp = CASE SIGN(@string)
            WHEN -1 THEN
                -- Nros negativos grandes con decimales
                concat('-',SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length),1,@length-len(@string)),ltrim(str(abs(@string),@length,@dec)))
            ELSE
                -- Nros positivos grandes con decimales
                concat(SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length),1,@length-len(@string)),ltrim(str(@string,@length,@dec)))                  
            END
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SELECT @resp = CASE SIGN(@string)
            WHEN -1 THEN
                --Nros negativo grande sin decimales
                concat('-',SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length),1,(@length-3)-len(@string)),ltrim(str(abs(@string),@length,@dec)))
            ELSE
                -- Nros positivos grandes con decimales
                concat(SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length),1,@length-len(@string)),ltrim(str(@string,@length,@dec)))                  
            END                     
    END
END
ELSE
    IF CHARINDEX('.',@string)>0
    BEGIN
        SELECT @resp =CASE SIGN(@string)
            WHEN -1 THEN
                -- Nros negativos con decimales
                concat('-',SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length),1,@length-len(@string)),ltrim(str(abs(@string),@length,@dec)))
            ELSE
                --Ntos positivos con decimales
                concat(SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length),1,@length-len(@string)),ltrim(str(abs(@string),@length,@dec))) 
            END
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SELECT @resp = CASE SIGN(@string)
            WHEN -1 THEN
                -- Nros Negativos sin decimales
                concat('-',SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length-3),1,(@length-3)-len(@string)),ltrim(str(abs(@string),@length,@dec)))
            ELSE
                -- Nros Positivos sin decimales
                concat(SUBSTRING(replicate(@pad,@length),1,(@length-3)-len(@string)),ltrim(str(abs(@string),@length,@dec)))
            END
    END
RETURN @resp

END

0

Here is my solution. I can pad any character and it is fast. Went with simplicity. You can change variable size to meet your needs.

Updated with a parameter to handle what to return if null: null will return a null if null

CREATE OR ALTER FUNCTION code.fnConvert_PadLeft(
    @in_str nvarchar(1024),
    @pad_length int, 
    @pad_char nchar(1) = ' ', 
    @rtn_null NVARCHAR(1024) = '')
RETURNS NVARCHAR(1024)
AS
BEGIN
     DECLARE @rtn  NCHAR(1024) = ' '
     RETURN RIGHT(REPLACE(@rtn,' ',@pad_char)+ISNULL(@in_str,@rtn_null), @pad_length)
END
GO

CREATE OR ALTER FUNCTION code.fnConvert_PadRight(
    @in_str nvarchar(1024), 
    @pad_length int, 
    @pad_char nchar(1) = ' ', 
    @rtn_null NVARCHAR(1024) = '')
RETURNS NVARCHAR(1024)
AS
BEGIN
     DECLARE @rtn  NCHAR(1024) = ' '
     RETURN LEFT(ISNULL(@in_str,@rtn_null)+REPLACE(@rtn,' ',@pad_char), @pad_length)
END
GO 

-- Example
SET STATISTICS time ON 
SELECT code.fnConvert_PadLeft('88',10,'0',''), 
    code.fnConvert_PadLeft(null,10,'0',''), 
    code.fnConvert_PadLeft(null,10,'0',null), 
    code.fnConvert_PadRight('88',10,'0',''), 
    code.fnConvert_PadRight(null,10,'0',''),
    code.fnConvert_PadRight(null,10,'0',NULL)


0000000088  0000000000  NULL    8800000000  0000000000  NULL

0

Based on the given answers I created a UDF that for my eyes is easier to read and use.

-- =============================================
-- Description: Left Pads a string with the given filler char. Total resulting string is strLen
-- =============================================

ALTER FUNCTION PadString
    (
        @str NVARCHAR(MAX)
       ,@filler CHAR(1) = '0'
       ,@strLen INT --how long will the whole string be so that it is filled with the filler if not enough
    )
RETURNS NVARCHAR(MAX)
AS
    BEGIN
        -- Declare the return variable here
        DECLARE @Result NVARCHAR(MAX)
        DECLARE @padstr NVARCHAR(MAX) = REPLICATE(@filler, @strlen) --fill the padstr with the filler char

        IF (LEN(@str) >= @strLen)
            SELECT @Result = @str
        ELSE
            SELECT @Result = RIGHT(@padstr + RTRIM(@str), @strLen)

        -- Return the result of the function
        RETURN @Result
    END
GO

To use it simply SELECT dbo.padstring('123', '0', 19)

-1

To provide numerical values rounded to two decimal places but right-padded with zeros if required I have:

DECLARE @value = 20.1
SET @value = ROUND(@value,2) * 100
PRINT LEFT(CAST(@value AS VARCHAR(20)), LEN(@value)-2) + '.' + RIGHT(CAST(@value AS VARCHAR(20)),2)

If anyone can think of a neater way, that would be appreciated - the above seems clumsy.

Note: in this instance, I'm using SQL Server to email reports in HTML format and so wish to format the information without involving an additional tool to parse the data.

1
  • 1
    Didn't know SQL Server allowed you to declare a variable without specifying its type. Anyway, your method does seem "clumsy" for a non-working one. :)
    – Andriy M
    Commented Mar 19, 2012 at 1:13
-4

Here is how I would normally pad a varchar

WHILE Len(@String) < 8
BEGIN
    SELECT @String = '0' + @String
END
2
  • 14
    Wow, this is amazingly bad.
    – Hogan
    Commented Mar 19, 2012 at 17:56
  • 1
    Loops, cursors, etc are all generally bad in SQL. Might be fine in application code but not in SQL. Some exceptions but this is not one of them.
    – Davos
    Commented Nov 22, 2012 at 23:32

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