Files uploaded to Amazon S3 that are smaller than 5GB have an ETag that is simply the MD5 hash of the file, which makes it easy to check if your local files are the same as what you put on S3.

But if your file is larger than 5GB, then Amazon computes the ETag differently.

For example, I did a multipart upload of a 5,970,150,664 byte file in 380 parts. Now S3 shows it to have an ETag of 6bcf86bed8807b8e78f0fc6e0a53079d-380. My local file has an md5 hash of 702242d3703818ddefe6bf7da2bed757. I think the number after the dash is the number of parts in the multipart upload.

I also suspect that the new ETag (before the dash) is still an MD5 hash, but with some meta data included along the way from the multipart upload somehow.

Does anyone know how to compute the ETag using the same algorithm as Amazon S3?

  • 8
    Just to clarify, the issue isn't that the ETag algorithm somehow changes if the file is over 5GB. The ETag algorithm is different for non-multipart uploads and for multipart uploads. You'd run into the same problem trying to calculate the ETag of a 6MB file if it were uploaded using one 5MB part and one 1MB part. MD5 is used for non-multipart uploads, which are capped at 5GB. The algorithm in my answer is used for multipart uploads, which are capped at 5GB per part. – Emerson Farrugia Jan 7 '14 at 18:47
  • It is also different if you have server side encryption enabled. I think etag should probably be considered implementation detail, and not be relied upon client-side. – wim Oct 4 '17 at 18:11
  • @wim Any idea how to calculate the ETag when SSE is enabled? – Avihoo Mamka May 29 at 16:34
  • No. And I don't expect this will even be possible - being able to infer anything about the content from the etag itself would run contrary to the goal of encryption in the first place, and if known payload would predictably reproduce the same etag then this would be an information leak. – wim May 29 at 17:00

11 Answers 11

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Just verified one. Hats off to Amazon for making it simple enough to be guessable.

Say you uploaded a 14MB file and your part size is 5MB. Calculate 3 MD5 checksums corresponding to each part, i.e. the checksum of the first 5MB, the second 5MB, and the last 4MB. Then take the checksum of their concatenation. Since MD5 checksums are hex representations of binary data, just make sure you take the MD5 of the decoded binary concatenation, not of the ASCII or UTF-8 encoded concatenation. When that's done, add a hyphen and the number of parts to get the ETag.

Here are the commands to do it on Mac OS X from the console:

$ dd bs=1m count=5 skip=0 if=someFile | md5 >>checksums.txt
5+0 records in
5+0 records out
5242880 bytes transferred in 0.019611 secs (267345449 bytes/sec)
$ dd bs=1m count=5 skip=5 if=someFile | md5 >>checksums.txt
5+0 records in
5+0 records out
5242880 bytes transferred in 0.019182 secs (273323380 bytes/sec)
$ dd bs=1m count=5 skip=10 if=someFile | md5 >>checksums.txt
2+1 records in
2+1 records out
2599812 bytes transferred in 0.011112 secs (233964895 bytes/sec)

At this point all the checksums are in checksums.txt. To concatenate them and decode the hex and get the MD5 checksum of the lot, just use

$ xxd -r -p checksums.txt | md5

And now append "-3" to get the ETag, since there were 3 parts.

It's worth noting that md5 on Mac OS X just writes out the checksum, but md5sum on Linux also outputs the filename. You'll need to strip that, but I'm sure there's some option to only output the checksums. You don't need to worry about whitespace cause xxd will ignore it.

Note: If you uploaded with aws-cli via aws s3 cp then you most likely have a 8MB chunksize. According to the docs, that is the default.

Update: I was told about an implementation of this at https://github.com/Teachnova/s3md5, which doesn't work on OS X. Here's a Gist I wrote with a working script for OS X.

  • interesting finding, hoping that amazon will not change it since it's undocumented feature – sanyi Nov 11 '13 at 10:52
  • Good point. According to the HTTP spec, the ETag is completely up to their discretion, the only guarantee is that they can't return the same ETag for a changed resource. I'm guessing there's not much advantage to changing the algorithm though. – Emerson Farrugia Nov 11 '13 at 11:12
  • 1
    Is there a way to compute the "part size" out of the etag? – DavidG Aug 5 '14 at 22:59
  • 1
    "Compute" no, "guess" maybe. If the ETag ends in "-4", you know that there are four parts, but that last part can have a size as small as 1 byte up to the part size. So dividing the file size by the number of parts gives you an estimate, but when the number of parts is small, e.g. -2, it gets harder to guess. If you have multiple files that were uploaded using the same part size, you could also look for adjacent part counts, e.g. -4 and -5 and narrow down what the part size can be, e.g. 1.9MB at -2 and 2.1MB at -3 means the part size is 2MB plus or minus 100KB. – Emerson Farrugia Aug 6 '14 at 8:45
  • Can you help me translate this in python? – kk1957 Oct 23 '14 at 23:16

Same algorithm, java version: (BaseEncoding, Hasher, Hashing, etc comes from the guava library

/**
 * Generate checksum for object came from multipart upload</p>
 * </p>
 * AWS S3 spec: Entity tag that identifies the newly created object's data. Objects with different object data will have different entity tags. The entity tag is an opaque string. The entity tag may or may not be an MD5 digest of the object data. If the entity tag is not an MD5 digest of the object data, it will contain one or more nonhexadecimal characters and/or will consist of less than 32 or more than 32 hexadecimal digits.</p> 
 * Algorithm follows AWS S3 implementation: https://github.com/Teachnova/s3md5</p>
 */
private static String calculateChecksumForMultipartUpload(List<String> md5s) {      
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    for (String md5:md5s) {
        stringBuilder.append(md5);
    }

    String hex = stringBuilder.toString();
    byte raw[] = BaseEncoding.base16().decode(hex.toUpperCase());
    Hasher hasher = Hashing.md5().newHasher();
    hasher.putBytes(raw);
    String digest = hasher.hash().toString();

    return digest + "-" + md5s.size();
}
  • My freaking hero!!!!!!!!! I spend many MANY hours trying to get the binary encoding correct... I didnt know guava had this functionality. – nterry Jun 9 '16 at 23:53
  • Very nice, works like a charm. Just a note: you can use the oneliner DigestUtils.md5Hex(raw) from apache-commons instead of Guava Hasher if needed. – Pom12 Sep 12 at 15:40

Not sure if it can help:

We're currently doing an ugly (but so far useful) hack to fix those wrong ETags in multipart uploaded files, which consists on applying a change to the file in the bucket; that triggers a md5 recalculation from Amazon that changes the ETag to matches with the actual md5 signature.

In our case:

File: bucket/Foo.mpg.gpg

  1. ETag obtained: "3f92dffef0a11d175e60fb8b958b4e6e-2"
  2. Do something with the file (rename it, add a meta-data like a fake header, among others)
  3. Etag obtained: "c1d903ca1bb6dc68778ef21e74cc15b0"

We don't know the algorithm, but since we can "fix" the ETag we don't need to worry about it either.

  • 1
    Awesome find! thanks! – d33pika Dec 4 '13 at 3:32
  • 2
    It does not work on file larger than 5GB though :( Do you have a workaround for that? – d33pika Dec 4 '13 at 3:37
  • Seems like this has stopped working, at least for the file I'm checking. – phunehehe Mar 29 '17 at 5:49

bash implementation

python implementation

The algorithm literally is (copied from the readme in the python implementation) :

  1. md5 the chunks
  2. glob the md5 strings together
  3. convert the glob to binary
  4. md5 the binary of the globbed chunk md5s
  5. append "-Number_of_chunks" to the end of the md5 string of the binary
  • This does not really explain how the algorithm works, etc. (didn't -1 btw) – Willem Van Onsem Oct 8 '15 at 23:38
  • I added the actual algorithm in a step by step list. I wrote the python implementation wading through posts on how to do it all day, most of them full of incorrect or outdated information. – tlastowka Oct 9 '15 at 0:35
  • This doesn't appear to work. Using the default chunk size of 8 (MB) I got a different etag from what amazon tells me is correct. – Cory Aug 3 '17 at 16:20

Based on answers here, I wrote a Python implementation which correctly calculates both multi-part and single-part file ETags.

def calculate_s3_etag(file_path, chunk_size=8 * 1024 * 1024):
    md5s = []

    with open(file_path, 'rb') as fp:
        while True:
            data = fp.read(chunk_size)
            if not data:
                break
            md5s.append(hashlib.md5(data))

    if len(md5s) == 1:
        return '"{}"'.format(md5s[0].hexdigest())

    digests = b''.join(m.digest() for m in md5s)
    digests_md5 = hashlib.md5(digests)
    return '"{}-{}"'.format(digests_md5.hexdigest(), len(md5s))

The default chunk_size is 8 MB used by the official aws cli tool, and it does multipart upload for 2+ chunks. It should work under both Python 2 and 3.

In an above answer, someone asked if there was a way to get the md5 for files larger than 5G.

An answer that I could give for getting the MD5 value (for files larger than 5G) would be to either add it manually to the metadata, or use a program to do your uploads which will add the information.

For example, I used s3cmd to upload a file, and it added the following metadata.

$ aws s3api head-object --bucket xxxxxxx --key noarch/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm 
{
  "AcceptRanges": "bytes", 
  "ContentType": "binary/octet-stream", 
  "LastModified": "Sat, 19 Sep 2015 03:27:25 GMT", 
  "ContentLength": 14540, 
  "ETag": "\"2cd0ae668a585a14e07c2ea4f264d79b\"", 
  "Metadata": {
    "s3cmd-attrs": "uid:502/gname:staff/uname:xxxxxx/gid:20/mode:33188/mtime:1352129496/atime:1441758431/md5:2cd0ae668a585a14e07c2ea4f264d79b/ctime:1441385182"
  }
}

It isn't a direct solution using the ETag, but it is a way to populate the metadata you want (MD5) in a way you can access it. It will still fail if someone uploads the file without metadata.

According to the AWS documentation the ETag isn't an MD5 hash for a multi-part upload nor for an encrypted object: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonS3/latest/API/RESTCommonResponseHeaders.html

Objects created by the PUT Object, POST Object, or Copy operation, or through the AWS Management Console, and are encrypted by SSE-S3 or plaintext, have ETags that are an MD5 digest of their object data.

Objects created by the PUT Object, POST Object, or Copy operation, or through the AWS Management Console, and are encrypted by SSE-C or SSE-KMS, have ETags that are not an MD5 digest of their object data.

If an object is created by either the Multipart Upload or Part Copy operation, the ETag is not an MD5 digest, regardless of the method of encryption.

And here is a PHP version of calculating the ETag:

function calculate_aws_etag($filename, $chunksize) {
    /*
    DESCRIPTION:
    - calculate Amazon AWS ETag used on the S3 service
    INPUT:
    - $filename : path to file to check
    - $chunksize : chunk size in Megabytes
    OUTPUT:
    - ETag (string)
    */
    $chunkbytes = $chunksize*1024*1024;
    if (filesize($filename) < $chunkbytes) {
        return md5_file($filename);
    } else {
        $md5s = array();
        $handle = fopen($filename, 'rb');
        if ($handle === false) {
            return false;
        }
        while (!feof($handle)) {
            $buffer = fread($handle, $chunkbytes);
            $md5s[] = md5($buffer);
            unset($buffer);
        }
        fclose($handle);

        $concat = '';
        foreach ($md5s as $indx => $md5) {
            $concat .= hex2bin($md5);
        }
        return md5($concat) .'-'. count($md5s);
    }
}

$etag = calculate_aws_etag('path/to/myfile.ext', 8);

And here is an enhanced version that can verify against an expected ETag - and even guess the chunksize if you don't know it!

function calculate_etag($filename, $chunksize, $expected = false) {
    /*
    DESCRIPTION:
    - calculate Amazon AWS ETag used on the S3 service
    INPUT:
    - $filename : path to file to check
    - $chunksize : chunk size in Megabytes
    - $expected : verify calculated etag against this specified etag and return true or false instead
        - if you make chunksize negative (eg. -8 instead of 8) the function will guess the chunksize by checking all possible sizes given the number of parts mentioned in $expected
    OUTPUT:
    - ETag (string)
    - or boolean true|false if $expected is set
    */
    if ($chunksize < 0) {
        $do_guess = true;
        $chunksize = 0 - $chunksize;
    } else {
        $do_guess = false;
    }

    $chunkbytes = $chunksize*1024*1024;
    $filesize = filesize($filename);
    if ($filesize < $chunkbytes && (!$expected || !preg_match("/^\\w{32}-\\w+$/", $expected))) {
        $return = md5_file($filename);
        if ($expected) {
            $expected = strtolower($expected);
            return ($expected === $return ? true : false);
        } else {
            return $return;
        }
    } else {
        $md5s = array();
        $handle = fopen($filename, 'rb');
        if ($handle === false) {
            return false;
        }
        while (!feof($handle)) {
            $buffer = fread($handle, $chunkbytes);
            $md5s[] = md5($buffer);
            unset($buffer);
        }
        fclose($handle);

        $concat = '';
        foreach ($md5s as $indx => $md5) {
            $concat .= hex2bin($md5);
        }
        $return = md5($concat) .'-'. count($md5s);
        if ($expected) {
            $expected = strtolower($expected);
            $matches = ($expected === $return ? true : false);
            if ($matches || $do_guess == false || strlen($expected) == 32) {
                return $matches;
            } else {
                // Guess the chunk size
                preg_match("/-(\\d+)$/", $expected, $match);
                $parts = $match[1];
                $min_chunk = ceil($filesize / $parts /1024/1024);
                $max_chunk =  floor($filesize / ($parts-1) /1024/1024);
                $found_match = false;
                for ($i = $min_chunk; $i <= $max_chunk; $i++) {
                    if (calculate_aws_etag($filename, $i) === $expected) {
                        $found_match = true;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                return $found_match;
            }
        } else {
            return $return;
        }
    }
}

Here is the algorithm in ruby...

require 'digest'

# PART_SIZE should match the chosen part size of the multipart upload
# Set here as 10MB
PART_SIZE = 1024*1024*10 

class File
  def each_part(part_size = PART_SIZE)
    yield read(part_size) until eof?
  end
end

file = File.new('<path_to_file>')

hashes = []

file.each_part do |part|
  hashes << Digest::MD5.hexdigest(part)
end

multipart_hash = Digest::MD5.hexdigest([hashes.join].pack('H*'))
multipart_etag = "#{multipart_hash}-#{hashes.count}"

Thanks to Shortest Hex2Bin in Ruby and Multipart Uploads to S3 ...

  • Nice! I confirm this works for me. Minor change: the last "multi_part_hash" should be "multipart_hash". I also added an "ARGV.each do" loop around the main part and a print at the end to make it a command-line script. – William Pietri May 12 '17 at 18:01

The algorithm presented in this answer is accurate. i.e. You take the 128bit binary md5 digest of each part, concatenate them into a document, and hash that document.

There's something else worthy of note about the algorithm: If you copy, or do an in-place copy of your completed multipart-uploaded object (aka PUT-COPY), S3 will recompute the ETAG and use the simple version of the algorithm. i.e. the destination object will have an etag without the hyphen.

You've probably considered this already, but if your files are less than 5GB, and you already know their MD5s, and upload parallelization provides little to no benefit (e.g. you are streaming the upload from a slow network, or uploading from a slow disk), then you may also consider using a simple PUT instead of a multipart put, and pass your known Content-MD5 in your request headers -- amazon will fail the upload if they don't match. Keep in mind that you get charged for each UploadPart.

Furthermore, in some clients, passing a known MD5 for the input of a PUT operation will save the client from recomputing the MD5 during the transfer. In boto3 (python), you would use the ContentMD5 parameter of the client.put_object() method, for instance. If you omit the parameter, and you already knew the MD5, then the client would be wasting cycles computing it again before the transfer.

No,

Till now there is not solution to match normal file ETag and Multipart file ETag and MD5 of local file.

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