116

I'm using python's ftplib to write a small FTP client, but some of the functions in the package don't return string output, but print to stdout. I want to redirect stdout to an object which I'll be able to read the output from.

I know stdout can be redirected into any regular file with:

stdout = open("file", "a")

But I prefer a method that doesn't uses the local drive.

I'm looking for something like the BufferedReader in Java that can be used to wrap a buffer into a stream.

  • I do not think stdout = open("file", "a") by itself will redirect anything. – Alexey Apr 16 '17 at 10:45
177
from cStringIO import StringIO # Python3 use: from io import StringIO
import sys

old_stdout = sys.stdout
sys.stdout = mystdout = StringIO()

# blah blah lots of code ...

sys.stdout = old_stdout

# examine mystdout.getvalue()
  • 49
    +1, you don't need to keep a reference to the original stdout object, as it is always available at sys.__stdout__. See docs.python.org/library/sys.html#sys.__stdout__. – Ayman Hourieh Aug 2 '09 at 14:00
  • 87
    Well, that's an interesting debate. The absolute original stdout is available, but when replacing like this, it's better to use an explicit save as I've done, since someone else could have replaced stdout and if you use stdout, you'd clobber their replacement. – Ned Batchelder Aug 2 '09 at 14:25
  • 5
    would this operation in one thread alter the behavior of other threads? I mean is it threadsafe? – Anuvrat Parashar Sep 13 '12 at 11:19
  • 5
    I highly recommend to reassign the old stdout in a finally: block, so it is also reassigned if an exception is risen in between. try: bkp = sys.stdout ... ... finally: sys.stdout = bkp – Matthias Kuhn Feb 20 '14 at 13:37
  • 16
    If you want to use this in Python 3, replace cStringIO with io . – Anthony Labarre Nov 29 '14 at 11:41
54

There is contextlib.redirect_stdout() function in Python 3.4:

import io
from contextlib import redirect_stdout

with io.StringIO() as buf, redirect_stdout(buf):
    print('redirected')
    output = buf.getvalue()

Here's code example that shows how to implement it on older Python versions.

  • 2
    There's also redirect_stderr on the latest Python too! – CMCDragonkai Oct 13 '16 at 13:19
  • I think there is no need to add try/finally block for this solution. – snr Jul 16 '18 at 14:50
  • Thanks man... that worked.. vote UP :) – AhmedWas Jan 25 at 10:32
34

Just to add to Ned's answer above: you can use this to redirect output to any object that implements a write(str) method.

This can be used to good effect to "catch" stdout output in a GUI application.

Here's a silly example in PyQt:

import sys
from PyQt4 import QtGui

class OutputWindow(QtGui.QPlainTextEdit):
    def write(self, txt):
        self.appendPlainText(str(txt))

app = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
out = OutputWindow()
sys.stdout=out
out.show()
print "hello world !"
  • This does not work, it locks the app, but i can't tell why. – Guillermo Siliceo Trueba Mar 20 '11 at 14:56
  • 5
    Works for me with python 2.6 and PyQT4. Seems strange to down vote working code when you can't tell why it doesn't work ! – Nicolas Lefebvre Mar 20 '11 at 15:18
  • 7
    don't forget to add flush() too! – Will Mar 13 '13 at 13:04
6

Starting with Python 2.6 you can use anything implementing the TextIOBase API from the io module as a replacement. This solution also enables you to use sys.stdout.buffer.write() in Python 3 to write (already) encoded byte strings to stdout (see stdout in Python 3). Using StringIO wouldn't work then, because neither sys.stdout.encoding nor sys.stdout.buffer would be available.

A solution using TextIOWrapper:

import sys
from io import TextIOWrapper, BytesIO

# setup the environment
old_stdout = sys.stdout
sys.stdout = TextIOWrapper(BytesIO(), sys.stdout.encoding)

# do something that writes to stdout or stdout.buffer

# get output
sys.stdout.seek(0)      # jump to the start
out = sys.stdout.read() # read output

# restore stdout
sys.stdout.close()
sys.stdout = old_stdout

This solution works for Python 2 >= 2.6 and Python 3.

Please note that our new sys.stdout.write() only accepts unicode strings and sys.stdout.buffer.write() only accepts byte strings. This might not be the case for old code, but is often the case for code that is built to run on Python 2 and 3 without changes, which again often makes use of sys.stdout.buffer.

You can build a slight variation that accepts unicode and byte strings for write():

class StdoutBuffer(TextIOWrapper):
    def write(self, string):
        try:
            return super(StdoutBuffer, self).write(string)
        except TypeError:
            # redirect encoded byte strings directly to buffer
            return super(StdoutBuffer, self).buffer.write(string)

You don't have to set the encoding of the buffer the sys.stdout.encoding, but this helps when using this method for testing/comparing script output.

  • This answer helped me when setting up an Environment object's stdout param for use with Httpie's core.py. – fragorl Dec 6 '17 at 23:52
5

This method restores sys.stdout even if there's an exception. It also gets any output before the exception.

import io
import sys

real_stdout = sys.stdout
fake_stdout = io.BytesIO()   # or perhaps io.StringIO()
try:
    sys.stdout = fake_stdout
    # do what you have to do to create some output
finally:
    sys.stdout = real_stdout
    output_string = fake_stdout.getvalue()
    fake_stdout.close()
    # do what you want with the output_string

Tested in Python 2.7.10 using io.BytesIO()

Tested in Python 3.6.4 using io.StringIO()


Bob, added for a case if you feel anything from the modified / extended code experimentation might get interesting in any sense, otherwise feel free to delete it

Ad informandum ... a few remarks from extended experimentation during finding some viable mechanics to "grab" outputs, directed by numexpr.print_versions() directly to the <stdout> ( upon a need to clean GUI and collecting details into debugging-report )

# THIS WORKS AS HELL: as Bob Stein proposed years ago:
#  py2 SURPRISEDaBIT:
#
import io
import sys
#
real_stdout = sys.stdout                        #           PUSH <stdout> ( store to REAL_ )
fake_stdout = io.BytesIO()                      #           .DEF FAKE_
try:                                            # FUSED .TRY:
    sys.stdout.flush()                          #           .flush() before
    sys.stdout = fake_stdout                    #           .SET <stdout> to use FAKE_
    # ----------------------------------------- #           +    do what you gotta do to create some output
    print 123456789                             #           + 
    import  numexpr                             #           + 
    QuantFX.numexpr.__version__                 #           + [3] via fake_stdout re-assignment, as was bufferred + "late" deferred .get_value()-read into print, to finally reach -> real_stdout
    QuantFX.numexpr.print_versions()            #           + [4] via fake_stdout re-assignment, as was bufferred + "late" deferred .get_value()-read into print, to finally reach -> real_stdout
    _ = os.system( 'echo os.system() redir-ed' )#           + [1] via real_stdout                                 + "late" deferred .get_value()-read into print, to finally reach -> real_stdout, if not ( _ = )-caught from RET-d "byteswritten" / avoided from being injected int fake_stdout
    _ = os.write(  sys.stderr.fileno(),         #           + [2] via      stderr                                 + "late" deferred .get_value()-read into print, to finally reach -> real_stdout, if not ( _ = )-caught from RET-d "byteswritten" / avoided from being injected int fake_stdout
                       b'os.write()  redir-ed' )#  *OTHERWISE, if via fake_stdout, EXC <_io.BytesIO object at 0x02C0BB10> Traceback (most recent call last):
    # ----------------------------------------- #           ?                              io.UnsupportedOperation: fileno
    #'''                                                    ? YET:        <_io.BytesIO object at 0x02C0BB10> has a .fileno() method listed
    #>>> 'fileno' in dir( sys.stdout )       -> True        ? HAS IT ADVERTISED,
    #>>> pass;            sys.stdout.fileno  -> <built-in method fileno of _io.BytesIO object at 0x02C0BB10>
    #>>> pass;            sys.stdout.fileno()-> Traceback (most recent call last):
    #                                             File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
    #                                           io.UnsupportedOperation: fileno
    #                                                       ? BUT REFUSES TO USE IT
    #'''
finally:                                        # == FINALLY:
    sys.stdout.flush()                          #           .flush() before ret'd back REAL_
    sys.stdout = real_stdout                    #           .SET <stdout> to use POP'd REAL_
    sys.stdout.flush()                          #           .flush() after  ret'd back REAL_
    out_string = fake_stdout.getvalue()         #           .GET string           from FAKE_
    fake_stdout.close()                         #                <FD>.close()
    # +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++     # do what you want with the out_string
    #
    print "\n{0:}\n{1:}{0:}".format( 60 * "/\\",# "LATE" deferred print the out_string at the very end reached -> real_stdout
                                     out_string #                   
                                     )
'''
PASS'd:::::
...
os.system() redir-ed
os.write()  redir-ed
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
123456789
'2.5'
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Numexpr version:   2.5
NumPy version:     1.10.4
Python version:    2.7.13 |Anaconda 4.0.0 (32-bit)| (default, May 11 2017, 14:07:41) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]
AMD/Intel CPU?     True
VML available?     True
VML/MKL version:   Intel(R) Math Kernel Library Version 11.3.1 Product Build 20151021 for 32-bit applications
Number of threads used by default: 4 (out of 4 detected cores)
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
>>>

EXC'd :::::
...
os.system() redir-ed
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
123456789
'2.5'
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Numexpr version:   2.5
NumPy version:     1.10.4
Python version:    2.7.13 |Anaconda 4.0.0 (32-bit)| (default, May 11 2017, 14:07:41) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]
AMD/Intel CPU?     True
VML available?     True
VML/MKL version:   Intel(R) Math Kernel Library Version 11.3.1 Product Build 20151021 for 32-bit applications
Number of threads used by default: 4 (out of 4 detected cores)
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 9, in <module>
io.UnsupportedOperation: fileno
'''
  • [ Thank you, Bob ] great help in this tiny piece of art. You have saved my day, after experimenting with pipe and filedescriptors' gymnastics. Many greetings to NH + to your "White Sheep", an indeed marvelous text and many inspirative visualisations. Great pleasure to have got the chance to 've visited your piece of The Globe! – user3666197 May 28 '18 at 12:32
  • Thank you @user3666197 for the kind words! Glad to help simplify this much-too-tedious task. I hope one day to visit your piece as well. : : : Just edited this answer to make it a bit more useful for Python 3. – Bob Stein May 28 '18 at 13:23
  • @user3666197 you have a meticulous soul. But I suggest that works better as a separate answer. – Bob Stein May 28 '18 at 15:34
4

In Python3.6, the StringIO and cStringIO modules are gone, you should use io.StringIO instead.So you should do this like the first answer:

import sys
from io import StringIO

old_stdout = sys.stdout
old_stderr = sys.stderr
my_stdout = sys.stdout = StringIO()
my_stderr = sys.stderr = StringIO()

# blah blah lots of code ...

sys.stdout = self.old_stdout
sys.stderr = self.old_stderr

// if you want to see the value of redirect output, be sure the std output is turn back
print(my_stdout.getvalue())
print(my_stderr.getvalue())

my_stdout.close()
my_stderr.close()
  • 1
    You could improve the quality of your Answer by explaining how the above code works and how this is an improvement over the Questioner's situation. – toonice Apr 9 '17 at 2:28
  • 1
    Thank your advise. – haofly Apr 9 '17 at 14:41
3

Use pipe() and write to the appropriate file descriptor.

https://docs.python.org/library/os.html#file-descriptor-operations

2

A context manager for python3:

import sys
from io import StringIO


class RedirectedStdout:
    def __init__(self):
        self._stdout = None
        self._string_io = None

    def __enter__(self):
        self._stdout = sys.stdout
        sys.stdout = self._string_io = StringIO()
        return self

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        sys.stdout = self._stdout

    def __str__(self):
        return self._string_io.getvalue()

use like this:

>>> with RedirectedStdout() as out:
>>>     print('asdf')
>>>     s = str(out)
>>>     print('bsdf')
>>> print(s, out)
'asdf\n' 'asdf\nbsdf\n'

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