6

I see a lot of examples on using EF code first with POCOs that show something like this:

public class Post
{
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }

    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    public virtual Blog Blog { get; set; }
}

Now, look at the Blog property. Should not it be like this instead:

private Blog blog;
public virtual Blog Blog 
{ 
    get
    {
        return blog;
    } 
    set
    {
        blog = value;
        if (blog != null)
        {
            BlogId = blog.BlogId;
        }
    } 
}

I mean, since you already are "polluting" your model with the foreign key, should not you at least keep it in sync with the reference? Or you should not rely on BlogId when reading data anyway (eg. like you want to know if a specific BlogId is on a list). Or maybe there is a magic property on DbContext (like KeepForeingKeysPropertiesSyncronizedWithReferences) that does that to me and I am the only sad programmer that are woried about this? Or am I paranoid? (also, sorry for my poor english)

EDIT Sorry for that - this really was a stupid question. Stefan is right, EF really does this for you. I wasn't seen this because the references I was passing was loaded with AsNoTracking(). Only in this condition you will have a reference with ID and the foreing key field will be 0. As long as you pass a reference that is already on the context, it should work.

  • 1
    Don't know about EF, but had you used NHibernate you would not put in the BlogId property at all. – erikkallen Aug 30 '12 at 8:49
  • I think that having the possibility of using the BlogId it is nice, so I do not need to have a Blog reference and still can save the association. I'm just confused about mantain it in sync - for me it looks like the obvious thing to do but I never seen someone doing it so maybe I am wrong :/ – user1526627 Aug 30 '12 at 9:19
1

You don't need to do this per se, EF does this for you.
If you set the independent association property, EF will synchronize the foreign key property to reflect your change and vice versa. It doesn't happen immediately automatically mind you, I think this happens after calling SaveChanges but I'm not sure.
If you want to know why some people use the foreign key property: it's more convenient in detached apps like web apps. When you need to scale your app, it can also help to improve performance (read this in a recent MS blog post somewhere).
Basically, you only need to do this yourself if you're mixing and matching; when in one method you're using the independent association property and in another you're using the foreign key property.

0

Database First code generated.

It appears you do yes otherwise you will receive the following error.

A referential integrity constraint violation occurred: The property values that define the referential constraints are not consistent between principal and dependent objects in the relationship.

Principle being your Post object , dependent being the Blog object.

when you attempt to attach your unallocated context free POCO back to the context EF 4.1 DBContext:

using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
using (ITAMdbContext db = new ITAMdbContext())
{
   db.Entry(post).State = System.Data.EntityState.Unchanged; // error here
   db.Entry(post).State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified; 
   db.SaveChnages();

This error is resolved by..

using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
using (ITAMdbContext db = new ITAMdbContext())
{
   post.BlogId = post.Blog.BlogId;
 // fix the broken FK value, EF will not do this for
 // you, it does not know if post.BlogId or the post.Blog.BlogId should be chosen. 

   db.Entry(post).State = System.Data.EntityState.Unchanged; 
   db.Entry(post).State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified; 
   db.SaveChnages();

doing it your way is valid if your POCO objects are not auto generated.

the reason you set post to Unchanged then set it to Modified is because the first Entry().State set on an object will cascade the same state to all child objects ! horrible but that's the way it appears to work. then when you call it again it only modifies the post object. This stops child objects being modified or added.

EDIT: This is no longer required, its done for you

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