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Does anyone know how many host bits are needed to guarantee that a subnet could have 9 usable hosts?

I was thinking about around 4, but I'm not sure. Can some shed some light on this?

  • Just because it has to do with a network protocol doesn't mean it belongs on serverfault. If it had to do with a piece of network equipment, then yes. – John Saunders Aug 2 '09 at 16:46
  • @John Saunders: Addressing is definitely in the scope of network equipment installation and maintenance. – Andrew Moore Aug 2 '09 at 16:55
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Two subnet addresses (all-ones and all-zeros) can't be used to indicate a host, so with N bits you get up to (2**N - 2) usable hosts. So, for 9 hosts, 4 bits is correct: it would do up to 14, but 3 bits would do only 6 hosts.

  • thanks alot so im right yh – dave s Aug 2 '09 at 16:17
  • If he's right, then maybe accept this as the answer. – John Saunders Aug 2 '09 at 16:47
  • my vote is here – dbasnett Jan 29 '10 at 15:43
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Here are networks that meet the requirement 192.168.1.0 /28

Mask:255.255.255.240 Host/Net - 14
Network          Broadcast
192.168.1.0      192.168.1.15
192.168.1.16     192.168.1.31
192.168.1.32     192.168.1.47
192.168.1.48     192.168.1.63
192.168.1.64     192.168.1.79
192.168.1.80     192.168.1.95
192.168.1.96     192.168.1.111
192.168.1.112    192.168.1.127
192.168.1.128    192.168.1.143
192.168.1.144    192.168.1.159
192.168.1.160    192.168.1.175
192.168.1.176    192.168.1.191
192.168.1.192    192.168.1.207
192.168.1.208    192.168.1.223
192.168.1.224    192.168.1.239
192.168.1.240    192.168.1.255

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