How can I convert seconds to hours, minutes and seconds?

show_time() {
  ?????
}

show_time 36 # 00:00:36
show_time 1036 # 00:17:26
show_time 91925 # 25:32:05

12 Answers 12

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I use the following function myself:

function show_time () {
    num=$1
    min=0
    hour=0
    day=0
    if((num>59));then
        ((sec=num%60))
        ((num=num/60))
        if((num>59));then
            ((min=num%60))
            ((num=num/60))
            if((num>23));then
                ((hour=num%24))
                ((day=num/24))
            else
                ((hour=num))
            fi
        else
            ((min=num))
        fi
    else
        ((sec=num))
    fi
    echo "$day"d "$hour"h "$min"m "$sec"s
}

Note it counts days as well. Also, it shows a different result for your last number.

  • @perreal's answer is more elegant. – iGEL May 11 '14 at 20:14
#!/bin/sh

convertsecs() {
 ((h=${1}/3600))
 ((m=(${1}%3600)/60))
 ((s=${1}%60))
 printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n" $h $m $s
}
TIME1="36"
TIME2="1036"
TIME3="91925"

echo $(convertsecs $TIME1)
echo $(convertsecs $TIME2)
echo $(convertsecs $TIME3)

For float seconds:

convertsecs() {
 h=$(bc <<< "${1}/3600")
 m=$(bc <<< "(${1}%3600)/60")
 s=$(bc <<< "${1}%60")
 printf "%02d:%02d:%05.2f\n" $h $m $s
}
  • Can it work with float seconds? When calling convertsecs 3.83 I got h=3.83/3600: syntax error: invalid arithmetic operator (error token is ".83/3600") – user Sep 10 '17 at 0:34
  • 1
    @user, updated the answer but you can also truncate the seconds if it is sufficient. – perreal Sep 10 '17 at 4:05
  • The first part of the answer with ((...)) is not portable: github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki/SC2039 and neither the second: bash: bc: command not found – user Mar 6 at 16:53

The simplest way I know of:

secs=100000
printf '%dh:%dm:%ds\n' $(($secs/3600)) $(($secs%3600/60)) $(($secs%60))

Note - if you want days then just add other unit and divide by 86400.

  • 5
    This will not give you leading 0s: use %02d instead of %d. – gniourf_gniourf Feb 11 '15 at 10:08
  • busybox safe :) – pstanton Oct 12 '16 at 1:37
  • if you want days you also need to change hours so they do not go above 24: printf '%dd %dh:%dm:%ds\n' $(($secs/86400)) $(($secs%86400/3600)) $(($secs%3600/60)) $(($secs%60)) – blue Feb 10 '17 at 22:22

Use date, converted to UTC:

$ date -d@36 -u +%H:%M:%S
00:00:36
$ date -d@1036 -u +%H:%M:%S
00:17:16
$ date -d@12345 -u +%H:%M:%S
03:25:45

The limitation is the hours will loop at 23, but that doesn't matter for most use cases where you want a one-liner.

  • I think this is only GNU's date, and is not portable. – Limited Atonement Feb 10 '16 at 18:20
  • OP asked for bash, so I assumed GNU date – ACyclic Feb 10 '16 at 20:06
  • I upvoted your answer because it's very helpful to me, but I'm using GNU/Linux. It's not safe to assume that anyone using bash is using GNU/Linux (and GNU date). The first case that comes to mind is OSX, but I think BSD falls in this category, too. – Limited Atonement Feb 11 '16 at 14:44
  • It is probably better to explain why the limitation is in place in more detail as it can be confusing. This function is a bit of a hack to the OP's request as it converts epoch seconds (number of seconds from 1970) to a chosen format, which means that if you give it more than 24 hours worth of seconds it will increase the day count and start the hours again – Arturski Oct 17 '16 at 9:27

Simple one-liner

$ secs=236521
$ printf '%dh:%dm:%ds\n' $(($secs/3600)) $(($secs%3600/60)) $(($secs%60))
65h:42m:1s

With leading zeroes

$ secs=236521
$ printf '%02dh:%02dm:%02ds\n' $(($secs/3600)) $(($secs%3600/60)) $(($secs%60))
65h:42m:01s

With days

$ secs=236521
$ printf '%dd:%dh:%dm:%ds\n' $(($secs/86400)) $(($secs%86400/3600)) $(($secs%3600/60)) \
  $(($secs%60))
2d:17h:42m:1s

With nanoseconds

$ secs=21218.6474912
$ printf '%02dh:%02dm:%02fs\n' $(echo -e "$secs/3600\n$secs%3600/60\n$secs%60"| bc | xargs echo)
05h:53m:38.647491s

Based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/28451379/188159 but edit got rejected.

For us lazy people: ready-made script available at https://github.com/k0smik0/FaCRI/blob/master/fbcmd/bin/displaytime :

#!/bin/bash

function displaytime {
  local T=$1
  local D=$((T/60/60/24))
  local H=$((T/60/60%24))
  local M=$((T/60%60))
  local S=$((T%60))
  [[ $D > 0 ]] && printf '%d days ' $D
  [[ $H > 0 ]] && printf '%d hours ' $H
  [[ $M > 0 ]] && printf '%d minutes ' $M
  [[ $D > 0 || $H > 0 || $M > 0 ]] && printf 'and '
  printf '%d seconds\n' $S
}

displaytime $1

Basically just another spin on the other solutions, but has the added bonus of suppressing empty time units (f.e. 10 seconds instead of 0 hours 0 minutes 10 seconds). Couldn't quite track down the original source of the function, occurs in multiple git repos..

All above is for bash, disregarding there "#!/bin/sh" without any bashism will be:

convertsecs() {
    h=`expr $1 / 3600`
    m=`expr $1  % 3600 / 60`
    s=`expr $1 % 60`
    printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n" $h $m $s
}
  • 1
    The POSIX shell can do arithmetic as well; replace expr $1 / 3600 with $(( $1 / 3600 )), for example. This is more efficient, as it does not require spawning a new process for each call to expr. – chepner Sep 8 '13 at 15:07
t=12345;printf %02d:%02d:%02d\\n $((t/3600)) $((t%3600/60)) $((t%60)) # POSIX
echo 12345|awk '{printf "%02d:%02d:%02d",$0/3600,$0%3600/60,$0%60}' # POSIX awk
date -d @12345 +%T # GNU date
date -r 12345 +%T # OS X's date

If others were searching for how to do the reverse:

IFS=: read h m s<<<03:25:45;echo $((h*3600+m*60+s)) # POSIX
echo 03:25:45|awk -F: '{print 3600*$1+60*$2+$3}' # POSIX awk
  • Using the date command with the @-timespec seems so most convenient to me, since it is a simple one-liner: date -u -d "@3661" "+%H:%M:%S" gives 01:01:01 as expected. – themole Dec 30 '17 at 18:31

I couldn't get Vaulter's/chepner's code to work correctly. I think that the correct code is:

convertsecs() {
    h=$(($1/3600))
    m=$((($1/60)%60))
    s=$(($1%60))
    printf "02d:%02d:%02d\n $h $m $s
}
  • miss closing of " after \n ;-) – Philippe Gachoud Oct 15 '13 at 5:56
  • And it should be %02d at the beginning ;-) – mpe Feb 1 '16 at 13:50

In one line :

show_time () {

    if [ $1 -lt 86400 ]; then 
        date -d@${1} -u '+%Hh:%Mmn:%Ss';
    else 
        echo "$(($1/86400)) days $(date -d@$(($1%86400)) -u '+%Hh:%Mmn:%Ss')" ;
    fi
}

Add days if exist.

This is old post ovbioius -- but, for those who might are looking for the actual time elapsed but in military format (00:05:15:22 - instead of 0:5:15:22 )

!#/bin/bash
    num=$1
    min=0
    hour=0
    day=0
    if((num>59));then
        ((sec=num%60))
        ((num=num/60))
            if((num>59));then
            ((min=num%60))
            ((num=num/60))
                if((num>23));then
                    ((hour=num%24))
                    ((day=num/24))
                else
                    ((hour=num))
                fi
            else
                ((min=num))
            fi
        else
        ((sec=num))
    fi
    day=`seq -w 00 $day | tail -n 1`
    hour=`seq -w 00 $hour | tail -n 1`
    min=`seq -w 00 $min | tail -n 1`
    sec=`seq -w 00 $sec | tail -n 1`
    printf "$day:$hour:$min:$sec"
 exit 0

on MacOSX 10.13 Slight edit from @eMPee584 's code to get it all in one GO (put the function in some .bashrc like file and source it, use it as myuptime. For non-Mac OS, replace the T formula by one that gives the seconds since last boot.

myuptime () 
{ 
    local T=$(($(date +%s)-$(sysctl -n kern.boottime | awk '{print $4}' | sed 's/,//g')));
    local D=$((T/60/60/24));
    local H=$((T/60/60%24));
    local M=$((T/60%60));
    local S=$((T%60));
    printf '%s' "UpTime: ";
    [[ $D > 0 ]] && printf '%d days ' $D;
    [[ $H > 0 ]] && printf '%d hours ' $H;
    [[ $M > 0 ]] && printf '%d minutes ' $M;
    [[ $D > 0 || $H > 0 || $M > 0 ]] && printf '%d seconds\n' $S
}

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