60

How can I convert seconds to hours, minutes and seconds?

show_time() {
  ?????
}

show_time 36 # 00:00:36
show_time 1036 # 00:17:26
show_time 91925 # 25:32:05
3

15 Answers 15

99

Use date, converted to UTC:

$ date -d@36 -u +%H:%M:%S
00:00:36
$ date -d@1036 -u +%H:%M:%S
00:17:16
$ date -d@12345 -u +%H:%M:%S
03:25:45

The limitation is the hours will loop at 23, but that doesn't matter for most use cases where you want a one-liner.

On macOS, run brew install coreutils and replace date with gdate

8
  • 2
    I think this is only GNU's date, and is not portable. Feb 10 '16 at 18:20
  • 1
    OP asked for bash, so I assumed GNU date
    – ACyclic
    Feb 10 '16 at 20:06
  • 1
    I upvoted your answer because it's very helpful to me, but I'm using GNU/Linux. It's not safe to assume that anyone using bash is using GNU/Linux (and GNU date). The first case that comes to mind is OSX, but I think BSD falls in this category, too. Feb 11 '16 at 14:44
  • 1
    Invalid syntax on macOS. Nov 12 '18 at 8:55
  • 1
    No need for coreutils on MacOS, you can use the ootb date: stackoverflow.com/a/66928998/191246
    – ccpizza
    Apr 3 at 8:15
87
#!/bin/sh

convertsecs() {
 ((h=${1}/3600))
 ((m=(${1}%3600)/60))
 ((s=${1}%60))
 printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n" $h $m $s
}
TIME1="36"
TIME2="1036"
TIME3="91925"

echo $(convertsecs $TIME1)
echo $(convertsecs $TIME2)
echo $(convertsecs $TIME3)

For float seconds:

convertsecs() {
 h=$(bc <<< "${1}/3600")
 m=$(bc <<< "(${1}%3600)/60")
 s=$(bc <<< "${1}%60")
 printf "%02d:%02d:%05.2f\n" $h $m $s
}
4
  • Can it work with float seconds? When calling convertsecs 3.83 I got h=3.83/3600: syntax error: invalid arithmetic operator (error token is ".83/3600")
    – user
    Sep 10 '17 at 0:34
  • 1
    @user, updated the answer but you can also truncate the seconds if it is sufficient.
    – perreal
    Sep 10 '17 at 4:05
  • The first part of the answer with ((...)) is not portable: github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki/SC2039 and neither the second: bash: bc: command not found
    – user
    Mar 6 '18 at 16:53
  • @user, ((...)) is ksh syntax indeed (also supported by zsh/bash). bc however is a non-optional standard POSIX command. <<< is zsh syntax though (also supported by bash and a few other shells these days, but not standard sh syntax). Leaving the parameter expansions unquoted implies zsh syntax. In other shells, they're subject to split+glob. But even in zsh the unquoted $(...) would still be subject to splitting. The support of %f is optional in POSIX printf. Nov 20 '20 at 11:36
60

The simplest way I know of:

secs=100000
printf '%dh:%dm:%ds\n' $((secs/3600)) $((secs%3600/60)) $((secs%60))

Note - if you want days then just add other unit and divide by 86400.

3
  • 7
    This will not give you leading 0s: use %02d instead of %d. Feb 11 '15 at 10:08
  • 1
    busybox safe :)
    – pstanton
    Oct 12 '16 at 1:37
  • 2
    if you want days you also need to change hours so they do not go above 24: printf '%dd %dh:%dm:%ds\n' $(($secs/86400)) $(($secs%86400/3600)) $(($secs%3600/60)) $(($secs%60))
    – blue
    Feb 10 '17 at 22:22
53

Simple one-liner

$ secs=236521
$ printf '%dh:%dm:%ds\n' $((secs/3600)) $((secs%3600/60)) $((secs%60))
65h:42m:1s

With leading zeroes

$ secs=236521
$ printf '%02dh:%02dm:%02ds\n' $((secs/3600)) $((secs%3600/60)) $((secs%60))
65h:42m:01s

With days

$ secs=236521
$ printf '%dd:%dh:%dm:%ds\n' $((secs/86400)) $((secs%86400/3600)) $((secs%3600/60)) \
  $((secs%60))
2d:17h:42m:1s

With nanoseconds

$ secs=21218.6474912
$ printf '%02dh:%02dm:%02fs\n' $(echo -e "$secs/3600\n$secs%3600/60\n$secs%60"| bc)
05h:53m:38.647491s

Based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/28451379/188159 but edit got rejected.

2
  • hell yeah one-liners FTW, script looks way cleaner w/this.
    – Noon Time
    Jul 25 '19 at 22:46
  • Superbly simple and effective +1 from me!
    – markc
    Dec 10 '19 at 14:09
38

I use the following function myself:

function show_time () {
    num=$1
    min=0
    hour=0
    day=0
    if((num>59));then
        ((sec=num%60))
        ((num=num/60))
        if((num>59));then
            ((min=num%60))
            ((num=num/60))
            if((num>23));then
                ((hour=num%24))
                ((day=num/24))
            else
                ((hour=num))
            fi
        else
            ((min=num))
        fi
    else
        ((sec=num))
    fi
    echo "$day"d "$hour"h "$min"m "$sec"s
}

Note it counts days as well. Also, it shows a different result for your last number.

1
  • This is a good cross-platform solution, works on both MacOS and Linux. I had issues getting echo Elapsed time: $(date -ud "@$elapsed" +'$((%s/3600/24)) days %H hr %M min %S sec')" to work on both (even tried using gdate instead, without success)
    – nvanwyen
    Jul 28 at 3:53
15

For us lazy people: ready-made script available at https://github.com/k0smik0/FaCRI/blob/master/fbcmd/bin/displaytime :

#!/bin/bash

function displaytime {
  local T=$1
  local D=$((T/60/60/24))
  local H=$((T/60/60%24))
  local M=$((T/60%60))
  local S=$((T%60))
  [[ $D > 0 ]] && printf '%d days ' $D
  [[ $H > 0 ]] && printf '%d hours ' $H
  [[ $M > 0 ]] && printf '%d minutes ' $M
  [[ $D > 0 || $H > 0 || $M > 0 ]] && printf 'and '
  printf '%d seconds\n' $S
}

displaytime $1

Basically just another spin on the other solutions, but has the added bonus of suppressing empty time units (f.e. 10 seconds instead of 0 hours 0 minutes 10 seconds). Couldn't quite track down the original source of the function, occurs in multiple git repos..

1
  • 1
    This is really nice — the only thing it's missing is dropping the -s from singular day(s), hour(s), minute(s) and second(s). Feb 3 at 11:22
8

Using dc:

$ echo '12345.678' | dc -e '?1~r60~r60~r[[0]P]szn[:]ndZ2>zn[:]ndZ2>zn[[.]n]sad0=ap'
3:25:45.678

The expression ?1~r60~r60~rn[:]nn[:]nn[[.]n]sad0=ap does the following:

?   read a line from stdin
1   push one
~   pop two values, divide, push the quotient followed by the remainder
r   reverse the top two values on the stack
60  push sixty
~   pop two values, divide, push the quotient followed by the remainder
r   reverse the top two values on the stack
60  push sixty
~   pop two values, divide, push the quotient followed by the remainder
r   reverse the top two values on the stack
[   interpret everything until the closing ] as a string
  [0]   push the literal string '0' to the stack
  n     pop the top value from the stack and print it with no newline
]   end of string, push the whole thing to the stack
sz  pop the top value (the string above) and store it in register z
n   pop the top value from the stack and print it with no newline
[:] push the literal string ':' to the stack
n   pop the top value from the stack and print it with no newline
d   duplicate the top value on the stack
Z   pop the top value from the stack and push the number of digits it has
2   push two
>z  pop the top two values and executes register z if the original top-of-stack is greater
n   pop the top value from the stack and print it with no newline
[:] push the literal string ':' to the stack
n   pop the top value from the stack and print it with no newline
d   duplicate the top value on the stack
Z   pop the top value from the stack and push the number of digits it has
2   push two
>z  pop the top two values and executes register z if the original top-of-stack is greater
n   pop the top value from the stack and print it with no newline
[   interpret everything until the closing ] as a string
  [.]   push the literal string '.' to the stack
  n     pop the top value from the stack and print it with no newline
]   end of string, push the whole thing to the stack
sa  pop the top value (the string above) and store it in register a
d   duplicate the top value on the stack
0   push zero
=a  pop two values and execute register a if they are equal
p   pop the top value and print it with a newline

An example execution with the stack state after each operation:

    : <empty stack>
?   : 12345.678
1   : 1, 12345.678
~   : .678, 12345
r   : 12345, .678  # stack is now seconds, fractional seconds
60  : 60, 12345, .678
~   : 45, 205, .678
r   : 205, 45, .678  # stack is now minutes, seconds, fractional seconds
60  : 60, 205, 45, .678
~   : 25, 3, 45, .678
r   : 3, 25, 45, .678  # stack is now hours, minutes, seconds, fractional seconds

[[0]n]  : [0]n, 3, 25, 45, .678
sz  : 3, 25, 45, .678  # '[0]n' stored in register z

n   : 25, 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3'
[:] : :, 25, 45, .678
n   : 25, 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:'
d   : 25, 25, 45, .678
Z   : 2, 25, 45, .678
2   : 2, 2, 25, 45, .678
>z  : 25, 45, .678  # not greater, so register z is not executed
n   : 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:25'
[:] : :, 45, .678
n   : 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:25:'
d   : 45, 45, .678
Z   : 2, 45, 45, .678
2   : 2, 2, 45, .678
>z  : 45, .678  # not greater, so register z is not executed
n   : .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:25:45'

[[.]n]  : [.]n, .678
sa  : .678  # '[.]n' stored to register a
d   : .678, .678
0   : 0, .678, .678
=a  : .678  # not equal, so register a not executed
p   : <empty stack>  # accumulated stdout: '3:25:45.678\n'

In the case of 0 fractional seconds:

    : 3, 25, 45, 0  # starting just before we begin to print

n   : 25, 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3'
[:] : :, 25, 45, .678
n   : 25, 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:'
d   : 25, 25, 45, .678
Z   : 2, 25, 45, .678
2   : 2, 2, 25, 45, .678
>z  : 25, 45, .678  # not greater, so register z is not executed
n   : 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:25'
[:] : :, 45, .678
n   : 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:25:'
d   : 45, 45, .678
Z   : 2, 45, 45, .678
2   : 2, 2, 45, .678
>z  : 45, .678  # not greater, so register z is not executed
n   : .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:25:45'

[[.]n]  : [.]n, 0
sa  : 0  # '[.]n' stored to register a
d   : 0, 0
0   : 0, 0, 0
=a  : 0  # equal, so register a executed
  [.] : ., 0
  n   : 0  # accumulated stdout: '3:35:45.'
p   : <empty stack>  # accumulated stdout: '3:25:45.0\n'

In case of a minutes value less than 10:

    : 3, 9, 45, 0  # starting just before we begin to print

n   : 9, 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3'
[:] : :, 9, 45, .678
n   : 9, 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:'
d   : 9, 9, 45, .678
Z   : 1, 9, 45, .678
2   : 2, 1, 9, 45, .678
>z  : 9, 45, .678  # greater, so register z is executed
  [0]   : 0, 9, 45, .678
  n     : 9, 45, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:0' 
n   : 9, .678  # accumulated stdout: '3:09'
# ...and continues as above

EDIT: this had a bug where strings like 7:7:34.123 could be printed. I have modified it to print a leading zero if necessary.

1
  • 7
    +1, certainly a strong candidate for "unmaintainable code of the week award" :-) But seriously, thanks for reminding us about "dc", very powerful.
    – mgaert
    Dec 20 '19 at 15:29
7

All above is for bash, disregarding there "#!/bin/sh" without any bashism will be:

convertsecs() {
    h=`expr $1 / 3600`
    m=`expr $1  % 3600 / 60`
    s=`expr $1 % 60`
    printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n" $h $m $s
}
1
  • 1
    The POSIX shell can do arithmetic as well; replace expr $1 / 3600 with $(( $1 / 3600 )), for example. This is more efficient, as it does not require spawning a new process for each call to expr.
    – chepner
    Sep 8 '13 at 15:07
5
t=12345;printf %02d:%02d:%02d\\n $((t/3600)) $((t%3600/60)) $((t%60)) # POSIX
echo 12345|awk '{printf "%02d:%02d:%02d",$0/3600,$0%3600/60,$0%60}' # POSIX awk
date -d @12345 +%T # GNU date
date -r 12345 +%T # OS X's date

If others were searching for how to do the reverse:

IFS=: read h m s<<<03:25:45;echo $((h*3600+m*60+s)) # POSIX
echo 03:25:45|awk -F: '{print 3600*$1+60*$2+$3}' # POSIX awk
1
  • Using the date command with the @-timespec seems so most convenient to me, since it is a simple one-liner: date -u -d "@3661" "+%H:%M:%S" gives 01:01:01 as expected.
    – themole
    Dec 30 '17 at 18:31
5

A MacOS-specific answer which is using the OOTB /bin/date and does not require the GNU version of date:

# convert 195 seconds to MM:SS format, i.e. 03:15
/bin/date -ju -f "%s" 195 "+%M:%S"

## OUTPUT: 03:15

If you also want to have hours:

/bin/date -ju -f "%s" 3600 "+%H:%M:%S"
# OUTPUT: 01:00:00

NOTE: If you want to deal with hours then -u is required as it's forcing UTC time and without it you'll get wrong output unless you live in the UTC time zone:

-u      Display or set the date in UTC (Coordinated Universal) time.

For an explanation why -u is needed see this.

3
  • 1
    Even shorter: date -ur 3600 +%T. The -r tells it to read the input as seconds since the epoch and not set the system data (essentially equivalent to -j -f "%s"), and the %T format is short for %H:%M:%S. This works on macOS and at least NetBSD, but not with GNU's date command (i.e. on Linux), where the -r option means something completely different. Aug 30 at 23:59
  • if the duration is longer than one day (no less than 86400 seconds), day part will overflow. any idea how to fix this?
    – jackxujh
    Aug 31 at 0:28
  • @jackxujh: if you use "+%H:%M:%S" as the format then anything over one day will not fit and you'll get a rollover effect. See man date on mac and notice [+output_fmt] at the end. What you put there will depend on what you expect to get, for example /bin/date -ju -f "%s" 86400 "+%d,%H:%M:%S"; date is not really meant to work with intervals, so the syntax above is bordering on abuse; if you need more flexibility/granularity better resort to python/ruby/js or whatever you are more comfortable with.
    – ccpizza
    Aug 31 at 13:50
4

In one line :

show_time () {

    if [ $1 -lt 86400 ]; then 
        date -d@${1} -u '+%Hh:%Mmn:%Ss';
    else 
        echo "$(($1/86400)) days $(date -d@$(($1%86400)) -u '+%Hh:%Mmn:%Ss')" ;
    fi
}

Add days if exist.

3

I couldn't get Vaulter's/chepner's code to work correctly. I think that the correct code is:

convertsecs() {
    h=$(($1/3600))
    m=$((($1/60)%60))
    s=$(($1%60))
    printf "02d:%02d:%02d\n $h $m $s
}
2
  • miss closing of " after \n ;-)
    – Pipo
    Oct 15 '13 at 5:56
  • And it should be %02d at the beginning ;-)
    – mpe
    Feb 1 '16 at 13:50
1

This is old post ovbioius -- but, for those who might are looking for the actual time elapsed but in military format (00:05:15:22 - instead of 0:5:15:22 )

!#/bin/bash
    num=$1
    min=0
    hour=0
    day=0
    if((num>59));then
        ((sec=num%60))
        ((num=num/60))
            if((num>59));then
            ((min=num%60))
            ((num=num/60))
                if((num>23));then
                    ((hour=num%24))
                    ((day=num/24))
                else
                    ((hour=num))
                fi
            else
                ((min=num))
            fi
        else
        ((sec=num))
    fi
    day=`seq -w 00 $day | tail -n 1`
    hour=`seq -w 00 $hour | tail -n 1`
    min=`seq -w 00 $min | tail -n 1`
    sec=`seq -w 00 $sec | tail -n 1`
    printf "$day:$hour:$min:$sec"
 exit 0
1

on MacOSX 10.13 Slight edit from @eMPee584 's code to get it all in one GO (put the function in some .bashrc like file and source it, use it as myuptime. For non-Mac OS, replace the T formula by one that gives the seconds since last boot.

myuptime () 
{ 
    local T=$(($(date +%s)-$(sysctl -n kern.boottime | awk '{print $4}' | sed 's/,//g')));
    local D=$((T/60/60/24));
    local H=$((T/60/60%24));
    local M=$((T/60%60));
    local S=$((T%60));
    printf '%s' "UpTime: ";
    [[ $D > 0 ]] && printf '%d days ' $D;
    [[ $H > 0 ]] && printf '%d hours ' $H;
    [[ $M > 0 ]] && printf '%d minutes ' $M;
    [[ $D > 0 || $H > 0 || $M > 0 ]] && printf '%d seconds\n' $S
}
1

Yet another version. Only handles full integers, doesn't pad with 0:

format_seconds() {
    local sec tot r

    sec="$1"

    r="$((sec%60))s"
    tot=$((sec%60))

    if [[ "$sec" -gt "$tot" ]]; then
        r="$((sec%3600/60))m:$r"
        let tot+=$((sec%3600))
    fi

    if [[ "$sec" -gt "$tot" ]]; then
        r="$((sec%86400/3600))h:$r"
        let tot+=$((sec%86400))
    fi

    if [[ "$sec" -gt "$tot" ]]; then
        r="$((sec/86400))d:$r"
    fi

    echo "$r"
}

$ format_seconds 59
59s
$ format_seconds 60
1m:0s
$ format_seconds 61
1m:1s
$ format_seconds 3600
1h:0m:0s
$ format_seconds 236521
2d:17h:42m:1s

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.