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I found the C standard (C99 and C11) vague with respect to character/string code positions and encoding rules:

Firstly the standard defines the source character set and the execution character set. Essentially it provides a set of glyphs, but does not associate any numerical values with them - So what is the default character set?

I'm not asking about encoding here but just the glyph/repertoire to numeric/code point mapping. It does define universal character names as ISO/IEC 10646, but does it say that this is the default charset?

As an extension to the above - I couldn't find anything which says what characters the numeric escape sequences \0 and \x represent.

From the C standards (C99 and C11, I didn't check ANSI C) I got the following about character and string literals:

 +---------+-----+------------+----------------------------------------------+
 | Literal | Std | Type       | Meaning                                      |
 +---------+-----+------------+----------------------------------------------+
 | '...'   | C99 | int        | An integer character constant is a  sequence |
 |         |     |            | of one or more multibyte characters          |
 | L'...'  | C99 | wchar_t    | A wide character constant is a sequence of   |
 |         |     |            | one or more multibyte characters             |
 | u'...'  | C11 | char16_t   | A wide character constant is a sequence of   |
 |         |     |            | one or more multibyte characters             |
 | U'...'  | C11 | char32_t   | A wide character constant is a sequence of   |
 |         |     |            | one or more multibyte characters             |
 | "..."   | C99 | char[]     | A character string literal is a sequence of  |
 |         |     |            | zero or more multibyte characters            |   
 | L"..."  | C99 | wchar_t[]  | A wide string literal is a sequence of zero  |
 |         |     |            | or more multibyte characters                 | 
 | u8"..." | C11 | char[]     | A UTF-8 string literal is a sequence of zero |
 |         |     |            | or more multibyte characters                 | 
 | u"..."  | C11 | char16_t[] | A wide string literal is a sequence of zero  |
 |         |     |            | or more multibyte characters                 | 
 | U"..."  | C11 | char32_t[] | A wide string literal is a sequence of zero  |
 |         |     |            | or more multibyte characters                 | 
 +---------+-----+------------+----------------------------------------------+

However I couldn't find anything about the encoding rules for these literals. UTF-8 does seem to hint UTF-8 encoding, but I don't think it's explicitly mentioned anywhere. Also, for the other types is the encoding undefined or implementation dependent?

I'm not to familiar with the UNIX specification. Does the UNIX specification specify any additional constraint(s) to these rules?

Also if anyone can tell me what charset/encoding scheme is used by GCC and MSVC that would also help.

5

C is not greedy about character sets. There's no such thing as "default character set", it's implementation defined - although it's mostly ASCII or UTF-8 on most modern systems.

  • Is it also implementation defined for u8"..." literals? It seems to hint towards UTF-8 encoding for that particular literal. – tinkerbeast Aug 30 '12 at 20:10
  • @tinkerbeast no - C doesn't require any particular character set. u8"..." indicates that the string should be composed from characters that fit in an eight-bit storage. – user529758 Aug 30 '12 at 20:11
  • @H2CO3 C11 does say u8 literals are utf-8. I'm not sure compilers have gotten around to implement that yet though – nos Aug 30 '12 at 20:24
  • @nos I looked it up and that's quite right :) However, I (and even GCC) are pretty much stuck at C99... – user529758 Aug 30 '12 at 20:25
4

The standard doesn't specify a default encoding because existing practice already had C implemented on machines with lots of different encodings, for example Honeywell mainframes and IBM mainframes.

I would expect gcc to take its default from the locale currently specified by LC_CHARSET, but I've never tested it.

VC++ takes its default from a Control Panel setting. That default Control Panel setting varies according to which country Windows was purchased in, and most users never change it, but they can change it while installing Windows can change it later.

Trigraphs were invented so that a source program could be copied from an environment with one locale to an environment with a slightly different locale and still be compiled. For example if a Windows user in China uses trigraphs then a Windows user in Greece would be able to compile the same source program. However, if the locales differ too much, for example one using EBCDIC and one using EUC, trigraphs won't suffice.

  • BTW, do you have any idea why the trigraphs were chosen to be so ugly, any why they operate within string and character literals? My theory, looking at the codes, is that they were chosen by a passive-agressive person who didn't want them in the first place. I would think it should have been perfectly sufficient to provide that if a line starts with #define __BACKSLASH_DESIGNATOR , any appearances of the character or sequence that follows (which must contain at least one character outside the standard C set) would be regarded as a backslash; other chars could then use backslash digraphs. – supercat Nov 16 '12 at 17:01
  • 2
    @supercat: This page explains the purpose of trigraphs. It dates from when the ANSI C standard was still a draft, and is part of a document containing rationale for many of the decisions made in that standard. – Peter O. Aug 1 '14 at 1:17
  • @PeterO.: Thanks for that. I still find myself curious whether any character sets that were used didn't have a backslash and didn't have a non-ASCII character that could be declared to have the same effect? When I was programming PL/I, the terminals were all ASCII and didn't have a ¬ character required for PL/I, but since PL/I didn't use ^, the ASCII-to-EBCDIC translation simply converted the ASCII ^ to the EBCDIC ¬. I wonder if the same approach could have worked with C--declare that every implementation must designate an "escape" character (which would be `` for ASCII), and... – supercat Aug 1 '14 at 15:10
  • ...say that in a character set where the escape character is , the characters # [ ] { } | ~ ^ would be rendered as ☃= ☃( ☃) ☃< ☃> ☃! ☃- ☃'? I suppose, though, my biggest question is why trigraphs work in string literals. If a C compiler is being used on a terminal whose glyph for character 0x7E looks like rather than ~, in what way would printf("??-"); be better than printf("→");? I would expect both statements to output a character. – supercat Aug 1 '14 at 15:23
  • The execution character set doesn't have to be identical to the source character set. Maybe programmer A used source character set A, and programmer A used trigraphs because if programmer B uses source character set B which doesn't have ~, programmer A still wants programmer B to be capable of compiling the program. Now, if user C runs the program on a system with execution character set C, maybe user C can see ~. However, if user D has execution character set D, which doesn't include ~, then the magic of trigraphs put user D into a parallel universe. No one gets to see a →. – Windows programmer Aug 3 '14 at 23:05

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