5178

What is the most efficient way to clone a JavaScript object? I've seen obj = eval(uneval(o)); being used, but that's non-standard and only supported by Firefox.

I've done things like obj = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(o)); but question the efficiency.

I've also seen recursive copying functions with various flaws.
I'm surprised no canonical solution exists.

  • 566
    Eval is not evil. Using eval poorly is. If you are afraid of its side effects you are using it wrong. The side effects you fear are the reasons to use it. Did any one by the way actually answer your question? – James Mar 22 '12 at 14:08
  • 15
    Cloning objects is a tricky business, especially with custom objects of arbitrary collections. Which probably why there is no out-of-the box way to do it. – b01 Mar 11 '13 at 22:25
  • 12
    eval() is generally a bad idea because many Javascript engine's optimisers have to turn off when dealing with variables that are set via eval. Just having eval() in your code can lead to worse performance. – user56reinstatemonica8 Sep 8 '14 at 13:37
  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Most elegant way to clone a JavaScript object – John Slegers Feb 21 '16 at 18:21
  • 12
    Note that JSON method will loose any Javascript types that have no equivalent in JSON. For example: JSON.parse(JSON.stringify({a:null,b:NaN,c:Infinity,d:undefined,e:function(){},f:Number,g:false})) will generate {a: null, b: null, c: null, g: false} – oriadam May 24 '17 at 13:06

67 Answers 67

9

For the people who want to use the JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)) version, but without losing the Date objects, you can use the second argument of parse method to convert the strings back to Date:

function clone(obj) {
  var regExp = /^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}T\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\.\d{3}Z$/;
  return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(x), function(k, v) {
    if (typeof v === 'string' && regExp.test(v))
      return new Date(v);
    return v;
  });
}
7

I use the npm clone library. Apparently it also works in the browser.

https://www.npmjs.com/package/clone

let a = clone(b)
6

I am late to answer this question, but I have an another way of cloning the object:

   function cloneObject(obj) {
        if (obj === null || typeof(obj) !== 'object')
            return obj;
        var temp = obj.constructor(); // changed
        for (var key in obj) {
            if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, key)) {
                obj['isActiveClone'] = null;
                temp[key] = cloneObject(obj[key]);
                delete obj['isActiveClone'];
            }
        }
        return temp;
    }



var b = cloneObject({"a":1,"b":2});   // calling

which is much better and faster then:

var a = {"a":1,"b":2};
var b = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(a));  

and

var a = {"a":1,"b":2};

// Deep copy
var newObject = jQuery.extend(true, {}, a);

I have bench-marked the code and you can test the results here:

and sharing the results: enter image description here References: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/hasOwnProperty

  • its funny but when I run your tests it actually shoed me that method 1 is the slowest one – Antoniossss Apr 26 '18 at 8:30
  • same as me, block 1 is the lowest! – SPG Dec 5 '18 at 1:08
6

ES 2017 example:

let objectToCopy = someObj;
let copyOfObject = {};
Object.defineProperties(copyOfObject, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors(objectToCopy));
// copyOfObject will now be the same as objectToCopy
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for the answer. I tried your approach, but unfortunately, it does not work. Because it could be some kind of mistake on my side, I ask you for check my example in JSFiddle and if it will be some mistake on my side, I'll vote up for your answer. – Takesi Tokugawa YD Jun 10 '18 at 3:39
  • When I run your fiddle, I get { foo: 1, bar: { fooBar: 22, fooBaz: 33, fooFoo: 11 }, baz: 3} and { foo: 1, bar: { fooBar: 22, fooBaz: 44, fooFoo: 11 }, baz: 4}. Is that not what you expect to happen? – codeMonkey Jun 10 '18 at 3:50
  • what you pasted is what I expected. I don't understand why, but I see fooBaz: 44 for both testObj2 and testObj3 in console... (screenshot) – Takesi Tokugawa YD Jun 10 '18 at 3:55
  • 1
    This is not a deep copy but a shallow copy. @GurebuBokofu – Nikita Malyschkin Jan 17 '19 at 6:25
6

In JavaScript, you can write your deepCopy method like

function deepCopy(src) {
  let target = Array.isArray(src) ? [] : {};
  for (let prop in src) {
    let value = src[prop];
    if(value && typeof value === 'object') {
      target[prop] = deepCopy(value);
  } else {
      target[prop] = value;
  }
 }
    return target;
}
| improve this answer | |
5

I usually use var newObj = JSON.parse( JSON.stringify(oldObje) ); but, here's a more proper way:

var o = {};

var oo = Object.create(o);

(o === oo); // => false

Watch legacy browsers!

  • The second way needs a Prototype, I prefer the first way, even if it's not the best one on performance due to you can use with a lot of browsers and with Node JS. – Hola Soy Edu Feliz Navidad May 3 '14 at 10:03
  • That's cool and all but suppose o has a property a. Now does oo.hasOwnProperty('a')? – user420667 Mar 29 '16 at 23:54
  • No -- o is essentially added as a prototype of oo. This is likely not going to be the desired behavior, which is why 99.9% of the serialize() methods I write use the JSON approach mentioned above. I basically always use JSON, and there're other caveats exposed when using Object.create. – Cody Mar 30 '16 at 2:30
  • 1
    No, watch this code! Object.create doesn't necessary create a copy of an object instead it uses the older object as a prototype for the clone – 16kb Jun 22 '18 at 1:07
5

Single-line ECMAScript 6 solution (special object types like Date/Regex not handled):

const clone = (o) =>
  typeof o === 'object' && o !== null ?      // only clone objects
  (Array.isArray(o) ?                        // if cloning an array
    o.map(e => clone(e)) :                   // clone each of its elements
    Object.keys(o).reduce(                   // otherwise reduce every key in the object
      (r, k) => (r[k] = clone(o[k]), r), {}  // and save its cloned value into a new object
    )
  ) :
  o;                                         // return non-objects as is

var x = {
  nested: {
    name: 'test'
  }
};

var y = clone(x);

console.log(x.nested !== y.nested);

  • 5
    Please provide an explanation alongside a code chunk so that others with a similar question can easily understand what is happening. As it stands now, this question is in a low quality posts review queue. – coatless Jul 17 '16 at 22:50
  • 1
    Please edit with more information. Code-only and "try this" answers are discouraged, because they contain no searchable content, and don't explain why someone should "try this". – Paritosh Jul 18 '16 at 9:17
5

Lodash has a function that handles that for you like so.

var foo = {a: 'a', b: {c:'d', e: {f: 'g'}}};

var bar = _.cloneDeep(foo);
// bar = {a: 'a', b: {c:'d', e: {f: 'g'}}} 

Read the docs here.

| improve this answer | |
  • I ended up using this, since the JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)) does not keep the original object prototype – tommyalvarez Jul 11 '17 at 17:27
  • This is my goto answer. Except that I use Lodash's merge, keeps the syntax somewhat consistent for deep and shallow copying. //Deep copy: _.merge({},foo) //Shallow copy: Object.Assign({}, foo) – RobbyD Jul 20 '17 at 7:30
5

There are so many ways to achieve this, but if you want to do this without any library, you can use the following:

const cloneObject = (oldObject) => {
  let newObject = oldObject;
  if (oldObject && typeof oldObject === 'object') {
    if(Array.isArray(oldObject)) {
      newObject = [];
    } else if (Object.prototype.toString.call(oldObject) === '[object Date]' && !isNaN(oldObject)) {
      newObject = new Date(oldObject.getTime());
    } else {
      newObject = {};
      for (let i in oldObject) {
        newObject[i] = cloneObject(oldObject[i]);
      }
    }

  }
  return newObject;
}

Let me know what you think.

| improve this answer | |
5

In my experience, a recursive version vastly outperforms JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)). Here is a modernized recursive deep object copy function which can fit on a single line:

function deepCopy(obj) {
  return Object.keys(obj).reduce((v, d) => Object.assign(v, {
    [d]: (obj[d].constructor === Object) ? deepCopy(obj[d]) : obj[d]
  }), {});
}

This is performing around 40 times faster than the JSON.parse... method.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Pseudocode would be: for each key, assign its value to the same key in a new object (shallow copy). However if the value is of type Object (can't shallow copy), the function recursively calls itself with the value as an argument. – Parabolord Aug 15 '18 at 20:48
  • 1
    Too bad it doesn't work right when the value is an array. But, shouldn't be too difficult to modify to get it to work for that case. – zenw0lf Aug 24 '19 at 22:30
  • TypeError: Cannot read property 'constructor' of undefined – medBouzid Oct 19 at 15:08
4

There are a lot of answers, but none of them gave the desired effect I needed. I wanted to utilize the power of jQuery's deep copy... However, when it runs into an array, it simply copies the reference to the array and deep copies the items in it. To get around this, I made a nice little recursive function that will create a new array automatically.

(It even checks for kendo.data.ObservableArray if you want it to! Though, make sure you make sure you call kendo.observable(newItem) if you want the Arrays to be observable again.)

So, to fully copy an existing item, you just do this:

var newItem = jQuery.extend(true, {}, oldItem);
createNewArrays(newItem);


function createNewArrays(obj) {
    for (var prop in obj) {
        if ((kendo != null && obj[prop] instanceof kendo.data.ObservableArray) || obj[prop] instanceof Array) {
            var copy = [];
            $.each(obj[prop], function (i, item) {
                var newChild = $.extend(true, {}, item);
                createNewArrays(newChild);
                copy.push(newChild);
            });
            obj[prop] = copy;
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
4

This is the fastest method I have created that doesn't use the prototype, so it will maintain hasOwnProperty in the new object.

The solution is to iterate the top level properties of the original object, make two copies, delete each property from the original and then reset the original object and return the new copy. It only has to iterate as many times as top level properties. This saves all the if conditions to check if each property is a function, object, string, etc., and doesn't have to iterate each descendant property.

The only drawback is that the original object must be supplied with its original created namespace, in order to reset it.

copyDeleteAndReset:function(namespace,strObjName){
    var obj = namespace[strObjName],
    objNew = {},objOrig = {};
    for(i in obj){
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(i)){
            objNew[i] = objOrig[i] = obj[i];
            delete obj[i];
        }
    }
    namespace[strObjName] = objOrig;
    return objNew;
}

var namespace = {};
namespace.objOrig = {
    '0':{
        innerObj:{a:0,b:1,c:2}
    }
}

var objNew = copyDeleteAndReset(namespace,'objOrig');
objNew['0'] = 'NEW VALUE';

console.log(objNew['0']) === 'NEW VALUE';
console.log(namespace.objOrig['0']) === innerObj:{a:0,b:1,c:2};
4

For future reference, the current draft of ECMAScript 6 introduces Object.assign as a way of cloning objects. Example code would be:

var obj1 = { a: true, b: 1 };
var obj2 = Object.assign(obj1);
console.log(obj2); // { a: true, b: 1 }

At the time of writing support is limited to Firefox 34 in browsers so it’s not usable in production code just yet (unless you’re writing a Firefox extension of course).

  • 3
    You probably meant obj2 = Object.assign({}, obj1). Your current code is equivalent to obj2 = obj1. – Oriol Jan 25 '15 at 11:10
  • 5
    This is a shallow-clone. const o1 = { a: { deep: 123 } }; const o2 = Object.assign({}, o1); o2.a.deep = 456; now o1.a.deep === 456 too. – Josh from Qaribou Feb 6 '17 at 14:21
  • 2
    Object.assign() is not for cloning nested objects. – Redu Apr 5 '17 at 14:31
  • 3
    Wow, another useless answer. Taken from MDN developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… : Warning for Deep Clone - For deep cloning, we need to use other alternatives because Object.assign() copies property values. If the source value is a reference to an object, it only copies that reference value. – basickarl Apr 21 '17 at 10:04
4

Cloning an object using today's JavaScript: ECMAScript 2015 (formerly known as ECMAScript 6)

var original = {a: 1};

// Method 1: New object with original assigned.
var copy1 = Object.assign({}, original);

// Method 2: New object with spread operator assignment.
var copy2 = {...original};

Old browsers may not support ECMAScript 2015. A common solution is to use a JavaScript-to-JavaScript compiler like Babel to output an ECMAScript 5 version of your JavaScript code.

As pointed out by @jim-hall, this is only a shallow copy. Properties of properties are copied as a reference: changing one would change the value in the other object/instance.

4

Here is my way of deep cloning a object with ES2015 default value and spread operator

 const makeDeepCopy = (obj, copy = {}) => {
  for (let item in obj) {
    if (typeof obj[item] === 'object') {
      makeDeepCopy(obj[item], copy)
    }
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(item)) {
      copy = {
        ...obj
      }
    }
  }
  return copy
}

const testObj = {
  "type": "object",
  "properties": {
    "userId": {
      "type": "string",
      "chance": "guid"
    },
    "emailAddr": {
      "type": "string",
      "chance": {
        "email": {
          "domain": "fake.com"
        }
      },
      "pattern": ".+@fake.com"
    }
  },
  "required": [
    "userId",
    "emailAddr"
  ]
}

const makeDeepCopy = (obj, copy = {}) => {
  for (let item in obj) {
    if (typeof obj[item] === 'object') {
      makeDeepCopy(obj[item], copy)
    }
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(item)) {
      copy = {
        ...obj
      }
    }
  }
  return copy
}

console.log(makeDeepCopy(testObj))

| improve this answer | |
4

What about asynchronous object cloning done by a Promise?

async function clone(thingy /**/)
{
    if(thingy instanceof Promise)
    {
        throw Error("This function cannot clone Promises.");
    }
    return thingy;
}
  • 2
    Hold on, 5 upvoters, how does it work? I forgot it myself and this looks counterintuitive, now that one and half years has past. – Константин Ван Aug 27 '19 at 16:13
  • No idea what it's supposed to do, I'm confused :s – Sebi Aug 22 at 12:27
  • Does Promise.resolve(value) resolve a cloned value? I doubt it, past myself. – Константин Ван Aug 22 at 22:41
4

For a shallow copy there is a great, simple method introduced in ECMAScript2018 standard. It involves the use of Spread Operator :

let obj = {a : "foo", b:"bar" , c:10 , d:true , e:[1,2,3] };

let objClone = { ...obj };

I have tested it in Chrome browser, both objects are stored in different locations, so changing immediate child values in either will not change the other. Though (in the example) changing a value in e will effect both copies.

This technique is very simple and straight forward. I consider this a true Best Practice for this question once and for all.

  • 1
    updating e in objClone will still update e in obj. This is still only a shallow copy. The question explicitly asks for a deep clone. – Taugenichts Jun 27 '18 at 14:59
  • @Taugenichts... did you tested it? The method works perfectly. Spread_syntax Spread in object literals section – mickro Jun 27 '18 at 17:06
  • 1
    yes, I tested it. run this code: objClone.e[4] = 5; console.log(obj.e); You will see obj.e being updated – Taugenichts Jun 27 '18 at 17:35
  • 2
    Because both are stored in different locations merely means it is at least a shallow copy. Look at where obj.e and objClone.e are stored; you will find that they are stored in the same location. – Lupus Ossorum Jun 29 '18 at 21:24
  • 1
    Thanks a lot, guys@LupusOssorum @Taugenichts for pointing this out. I tested it myself and found out what you guys identified here. But do you have any idea why the array still does not change memory, though ECMA2018 boasts of this as a feature. – Vikram K Jul 10 '18 at 9:29
4

My scenario was a bit different. I had an object with nested objects as well as functions. Therefore, Object.assign() and JSON.stringify() were not solutions to my problem. Using third-party libraries was not an option for me neither.

Hence, I decided to make a simple function to use built-in methods to copy an object with its literal properties, its nested objects, and functions.

let deepCopy = (target, source) => {
    Object.assign(target, source);
    // check if there's any nested objects
    Object.keys(source).forEach((prop) => {
        /**
          * assign function copies functions and
          * literals (int, strings, etc...)
          * except for objects and arrays, so:
          */
        if (typeof(source[prop]) === 'object') {
            // check if the item is, in fact, an array
            if (Array.isArray(source[prop])) {
                // clear the copied referenece of nested array
                target[prop] = Array();
                // iterate array's item and copy over
                source[prop].forEach((item, index) => {
                    // array's items could be objects too!
                    if (typeof(item) === 'object') {
                        // clear the copied referenece of nested objects
                        target[prop][index] = Object();
                        // and re do the process for nested objects
                        deepCopy(target[prop][index], item);
                    } else {
                        target[prop].push(item);
                    }
                });
            // otherwise, treat it as an object
            } else {
                // clear the copied referenece of nested objects
                target[prop] = Object();
                // and re do the process for nested objects
                deepCopy(target[prop], source[prop]);
            }
        }
    });
};

Here's a test code:

let a = {
    name: 'Human', 
    func: () => {
        console.log('Hi!');
    }, 
    prop: {
        age: 21, 
        info: {
            hasShirt: true, 
            hasHat: false
        }
    },
    mark: [89, 92, { exam: [1, 2, 3] }]
};

let b = Object();

deepCopy(b, a);

a.name = 'Alien';
a.func = () => { console.log('Wassup!'); };
a.prop.age = 1024;
a.prop.info.hasShirt = false;
a.mark[0] = 87;
a.mark[1] = 91;
a.mark[2].exam = [4, 5, 6];

console.log(a); // updated props
console.log(b);

For efficiency-related concerns, I believe this is the simplest and most efficient solution to the problem I had. I would appreciate any comments on this algorithm that could make it more efficient.

4

Object.assign({},sourceObj) only clones the object if their property is not having reference type key. ex

obj={a:"lol",b:["yes","no","maybe"]}
clonedObj = Object.assign({},obj);

clonedObj.b.push("skip")// changes will reflected to the actual obj as well because of its reference type.
obj.b //will also console => yes,no,maybe,skip

So for the deep cloning is not possible to achieve in this way.

The best solution that works is

var obj = Json.stringify(yourSourceObj)
var cloned = Json.parse(obj);
3

I think that this is the best solution if you want to generalize your object cloning algorithm.
It can be used with or without jQuery, although I recommend leaving jQuery's extend method out if you want you the cloned object to have the same "class" as the original one.

function clone(obj){
    if(typeof(obj) == 'function')//it's a simple function
        return obj;
    //of it's not an object (but could be an array...even if in javascript arrays are objects)
    if(typeof(obj) !=  'object' || obj.constructor.toString().indexOf('Array')!=-1)
        if(JSON != undefined)//if we have the JSON obj
            try{
                return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj));
            }catch(err){
                return JSON.parse('"'+JSON.stringify(obj)+'"');
            }
        else
            try{
                return eval(uneval(obj));
            }catch(err){
                return eval('"'+uneval(obj)+'"');
            }
    // I used to rely on jQuery for this, but the "extend" function returns
    //an object similar to the one cloned,
    //but that was not an instance (instanceof) of the cloned class
    /*
    if(jQuery != undefined)//if we use the jQuery plugin
        return jQuery.extend(true,{},obj);
    else//we recursivley clone the object
    */
    return (function _clone(obj){
        if(obj == null || typeof(obj) != 'object')
            return obj;
        function temp () {};
        temp.prototype = obj;
        var F = new temp;
        for(var key in obj)
            F[key] = clone(obj[key]);
        return F;
    })(obj);            
}
3

This is my version of object cloner. This is a stand-alone version of the jQuery method, with only few tweaks and adjustments. Check out the fiddle. I've used a lot of jQuery until the day I realized that I'd use only this function most of the time x_x.

The usage is the same as described into the jQuery API:

  • Non-deep clone: extend(object_dest, object_source);
  • Deep clone: extend(true, object_dest, object_source);

One extra function is used to define if object is proper to be cloned.

/**
 * This is a quasi clone of jQuery's extend() function.
 * by Romain WEEGER for wJs library - www.wexample.com
 * @returns {*|{}}
 */
function extend() {
    // Make a copy of arguments to avoid JavaScript inspector hints.
    var to_add, name, copy_is_array, clone,

    // The target object who receive parameters
    // form other objects.
    target = arguments[0] || {},

    // Index of first argument to mix to target.
    i = 1,

    // Mix target with all function arguments.
    length = arguments.length,

    // Define if we merge object recursively.
    deep = false;

    // Handle a deep copy situation.
    if (typeof target === 'boolean') {
        deep = target;

        // Skip the boolean and the target.
        target = arguments[ i ] || {};

        // Use next object as first added.
        i++;
    }

    // Handle case when target is a string or something (possible in deep copy)
    if (typeof target !== 'object' && typeof target !== 'function') {
        target = {};
    }

    // Loop trough arguments.
    for (false; i < length; i += 1) {

        // Only deal with non-null/undefined values
        if ((to_add = arguments[ i ]) !== null) {

            // Extend the base object.
            for (name in to_add) {

                // We do not wrap for loop into hasOwnProperty,
                // to access to all values of object.
                // Prevent never-ending loop.
                if (target === to_add[name]) {
                    continue;
                }

                // Recurse if we're merging plain objects or arrays.
                if (deep && to_add[name] && (is_plain_object(to_add[name]) || (copy_is_array = Array.isArray(to_add[name])))) {
                    if (copy_is_array) {
                        copy_is_array = false;
                        clone = target[name] && Array.isArray(target[name]) ? target[name] : [];
                    }
                    else {
                        clone = target[name] && is_plain_object(target[name]) ? target[name] : {};
                    }

                    // Never move original objects, clone them.
                    target[name] = extend(deep, clone, to_add[name]);
                }

                // Don't bring in undefined values.
                else if (to_add[name] !== undefined) {
                    target[name] = to_add[name];
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return target;
}

/**
 * Check to see if an object is a plain object
 * (created using "{}" or "new Object").
 * Forked from jQuery.
 * @param obj
 * @returns {boolean}
 */
function is_plain_object(obj) {
    // Not plain objects:
    // - Any object or value whose internal [[Class]] property is not "[object Object]"
    // - DOM nodes
    // - window
    if (obj === null || typeof obj !== "object" || obj.nodeType || (obj !== null && obj === obj.window)) {
        return false;
    }
    // Support: Firefox <20
    // The try/catch suppresses exceptions thrown when attempting to access
    // the "constructor" property of certain host objects, i.e. |window.location|
    // https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=814622
    try {
        if (obj.constructor && !this.hasOwnProperty.call(obj.constructor.prototype, "isPrototypeOf")) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    catch (e) {
        return false;
    }

    // If the function hasn't returned already, we're confident that
    // |obj| is a plain object, created by {} or constructed with new Object
    return true;
}
  • 1
    You may want to add || typeof target[name] !== "undefined" when testing if (target === to_add[name]) { continue; } to not overwrite the existing members of target. For example var a={hello:"world", foo:"bar"}; var b={hello:"you"}; extend(b, a); we expect to find b => {hello:"you", foo:"bar"}, but with your code we find: b => {hello:"world", foo:"bar"} – AymKdn May 26 '17 at 10:05
  • In my case I expected indeed to overwrite existing members, so the current behaviour was the wright one for this usage. But thank you to add this helpful suggestion. – weeger Jun 16 '17 at 13:01
3

As recursion is just too expensive for JavaScript, and most answers I have found are using recursion, while JSON approach will skip the non-JSON-convertible parts (Function, etc.). So I did a little research and found this trampoline technique to avoid it. Here's the code:

/*
 * Trampoline to avoid recursion in JavaScript, see:
 *     http://www.integralist.co.uk/posts/js-recursion.html
 */
function trampoline() {
    var func = arguments[0];
    var args = [];
    for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        args[i - 1] = arguments[i];
    }

    var currentBatch = func.apply(this, args);
    var nextBatch = [];

    while (currentBatch && currentBatch.length > 0) {
        currentBatch.forEach(function(eachFunc) {
            var ret = eachFunc();
            if (ret && ret.length > 0) {
                nextBatch = nextBatch.concat(ret);
            }
        });

        currentBatch = nextBatch;
        nextBatch = [];
    }
};

/*
 *  Deep clone an object using the trampoline technique.
 *
 *  @param target {Object} Object to clone
 *  @return {Object} Cloned object.
 */
function clone(target) {
    if (typeof target !== 'object') {
        return target;
    }
    if (target == null || Object.keys(target).length == 0) {
        return target;
    }

    function _clone(b, a) {
        var nextBatch = [];
        for (var key in b) {
            if (typeof b[key] === 'object' && b[key] !== null) {
                if (b[key] instanceof Array) {
                    a[key] = [];
                }
                else {
                    a[key] = {};
                }
                nextBatch.push(_clone.bind(null, b[key], a[key]));
            }
            else {
                a[key] = b[key];
            }
        }
        return nextBatch;
    };

    var ret = target instanceof Array ? [] : {};
    (trampoline.bind(null, _clone))(target, ret);
    return ret;
};

Also see this gist: https://gist.github.com/SeanOceanHu/7594cafbfab682f790eb

  • 1
    Tail call recursion is actually very efficient in most implementations of JavaScript, and is required to be optimized in ES6. – rich remer Feb 13 '16 at 5:19
  • Hi I did a little test back then, and when the target object becomes complex, the call stack would easily overflow, though I didn't take any notes, hopefully in es6 this will be a big op. – Bodhi Hu Apr 22 '16 at 12:36
  • Stack would easily overflow, probably because of the circular reference. – Joe Yichong Jan 11 '17 at 1:16
3

Looking through this long list of answers nearly all the solutions have been covered except one that I am aware of. This is the list of VANILLA JS ways of deep cloning an object.

  1. JSON.parse(JSON.stringify( obj ) );

  2. Through history.state with pushState or replaceState

  3. Web Notifications API but this has the downside of asking the user for permissions.

  4. Doing your own recursive loop through the object to copy each level.

  5. The answer I didn't see -> Using ServiceWorkers. The messages (objects) passed back and forth between the page and the ServiceWorker script will be deep clones of any object.

| improve this answer | |
  • All these have already been converted either in the answers or the comments. I would vote this up if you gave unique code examples for each one though. – Jack Giffin Apr 7 '18 at 0:24
3

Hope this helps.

function deepClone(obj) {
    /*
     * Duplicates an object 
     */

    var ret = null;
    if (obj !== Object(obj)) { // primitive types
        return obj;
    }
    if (obj instanceof String || obj instanceof Number || obj instanceof Boolean) { // string objecs
        ret = obj; // for ex: obj = new String("Spidergap")
    } else if (obj instanceof Date) { // date
        ret = new obj.constructor();
    } else
        ret = Object.create(obj.constructor.prototype);

    var prop = null;
    var allProps = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj); //gets non enumerables also


    var props = {};
    for (var i in allProps) {
        prop = allProps[i];
        props[prop] = false;
    }

    for (i in obj) {
        props[i] = i;
    }

    //now props contain both enums and non enums 
    var propDescriptor = null;
    var newPropVal = null; // value of the property in new object
    for (i in props) {
        prop = obj[i];
        propDescriptor = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(obj, i);

        if (Array.isArray(prop)) { //not backward compatible
            prop = prop.slice(); // to copy the array
        } else
        if (prop instanceof Date == true) {
            prop = new prop.constructor();
        } else
        if (prop instanceof Object == true) {
            if (prop instanceof Function == true) { // function
                if (!Function.prototype.clone) {
                    Function.prototype.clone = function() {
                        var that = this;
                        var temp = function tmp() {
                            return that.apply(this, arguments);
                        };
                        for (var ky in this) {
                            temp[ky] = this[ky];
                        }
                        return temp;
                    }
                }
                prop = prop.clone();

            } else // normal object 
            {
                prop = deepClone(prop);
            }

        }

        newPropVal = {
            value: prop
        };
        if (propDescriptor) {
            /*
             * If property descriptors are there, they must be copied
             */
            newPropVal.enumerable = propDescriptor.enumerable;
            newPropVal.writable = propDescriptor.writable;

        }
        if (!ret.hasOwnProperty(i)) // when String or other predefined objects
            Object.defineProperty(ret, i, newPropVal); // non enumerable

    }
    return ret;
}

https://github.com/jinujd/Javascript-Deep-Clone

2

Use Object.create() to get the prototype and support for instanceof, and use a for() loop to get enumerable keys:

function cloneObject(source) {
    var key,value;
    var clone = Object.create(source);

    for (key in source) {
        if (source.hasOwnProperty(key) === true) {
            value = source[key];

            if (value!==null && typeof value==="object") {
                clone[key] = cloneObject(value);
            } else {
                clone[key] = value;
            }
        }
    }

    return clone;
}
  • Great answer! I think this is the one of the only methods to keep setters and getter intact. This solved my problem. Thanks! (see: stackoverflow.com/questions/33207028/…) – lepe Oct 20 '15 at 5:54
  • Wouldn't you want to use clone = Object.create(Object.getPrototypeOf(source)), instead of inheriting properties which you also overwrite? – Jeremy Apr 7 '16 at 17:47
  • Interesting. Though, using getPrototypeOf on an Array turns its indexes into keys of a new Object. – Steven Vachon Apr 11 '16 at 16:47
2

Requires new-ish browsers, but...

Let's extend the native Object and get a real .extend();

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'extend', {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function(){
        var that = this;

        Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments).map(function(source){
            var props = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(source),
                i = 0, l = props.length,
                prop;

            for(; i < l; ++i){
                prop = props[i];

                if(that.hasOwnProperty(prop) && typeof(that[prop]) === 'object'){
                    that[prop] = that[prop].extend(source[prop]);
                }else{
                    Object.defineProperty(that, prop, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(source, prop));
                }
            }
        });

        return this;
    }
});

Just pop that in prior to any code that uses .extend() on an object.

Example:

var obj1 = {
    node1: '1',
    node2: '2',
    node3: 3
};

var obj2 = {
    node1: '4',
    node2: 5,
    node3: '6'
};

var obj3 = ({}).extend(obj1, obj2);

console.log(obj3);
// Object {node1: "4", node2: 5, node3: "6"}
| improve this answer | |
  • Mutating prototypes is generally considered bad practice, with the only exception being for shims. – Josh from Qaribou Feb 6 '17 at 14:23
2

This is a solution with recursion:

obj = {
  a: { b: { c: { d: ['1', '2'] } } },
  e: 'Saeid'
}
const Clone = function (obj) {
  
  const container = Array.isArray(obj) ? [] : {}
  const keys  = Object.keys(obj)
   
  for (let i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {
    const key = keys[i]
    if(typeof obj[key] == 'object') {
      container[key] = Clone(obj[key])
    }
    else
      container[key] = obj[key].slice()
  }
  
  return container
}
 console.log(Clone(obj))

2

For future reference, one can use this code

ES6:

_clone: function(obj){
    let newObj = {};
    for(let i in obj){
        if(typeof(obj[i]) === 'object' && Object.keys(obj[i]).length){
            newObj[i] = clone(obj[i]);
        } else{
            newObj[i] = obj[i];
        }
    }
    return Object.assign({},newObj);
}

ES5:

function clone(obj){
let newObj = {};
for(let i in obj){
    if(typeof(obj[i]) === 'object' && Object.keys(obj[i]).length){
        newObj[i] = clone(obj[i]);
    } else{
        newObj[i] = obj[i];
    }
}
return Object.assign({},newObj);

}

E.g

var obj ={a:{b:1,c:3},d:4,e:{f:6}}
var xc = clone(obj);
console.log(obj); //{a:{b:1,c:3},d:4,e:{f:6}}
console.log(xc); //{a:{b:1,c:3},d:4,e:{f:6}}

xc.a.b = 90;
console.log(obj); //{a:{b:1,c:3},d:4,e:{f:6}}
console.log(xc); //{a:{b:90,c:3},d:4,e:{f:6}}
| improve this answer | |
  • this does not handle arrays, that are, indeed, objects as well. – Soldeplata Saketos Oct 30 '17 at 8:02
2

class Handler {
  static deepCopy (obj) {
    if (Object.prototype.toString.call(obj) === '[object Array]') {
      const result = [];
      
      for (let i = 0, len = obj.length; i < len; i++) {
        result[i] = Handler.deepCopy(obj[i]);
      }
      return result;
    } else if (Object.prototype.toString.call(obj) === '[object Object]') {
      const result = {};
      for (let prop in obj) {
        result[prop] = Handler.deepCopy(obj[prop]);
      }
      return result;
    }
    return obj;
  }
}

| improve this answer | |
2

Without touching the prototypical inheritance you may deep lone objects and arrays as follows;

function objectClone(o){
  var ot = Array.isArray(o);
  return o !== null && typeof o === "object" ? Object.keys(o)
                                                     .reduce((r,k) => o[k] !== null && typeof o[k] === "object" ? (r[k] = objectClone(o[k]),r)
                                                                                                                : (r[k] = o[k],r), ot ? [] : {})
                                             : o;
}
var obj = {a: 1, b: {c: 2, d: {e: 3, f: {g: 4, h: null}}}},
    arr = [1,2,[3,4,[5,6,[7]]]],
    nil = null,
  clobj = objectClone(obj),
  clarr = objectClone(arr),
  clnil = objectClone(nil);
console.log(clobj, obj === clobj);
console.log(clarr, arr === clarr);
console.log(clnil, nil === clnil);
clarr[2][2][2] = "seven";
console.log(arr, clarr);

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.