5

I have a unit test to verify that an object (say Foo) will call certain method (say Bar) when an event is fired with certain eventArgs. To mock the said method, I use virtual and stub the Foo class

Mock<Foo> stubbedFoo = new Mock<Foo>(mockEventProvider);

mockEventProvider.Raise( x => x.MyEvent += null, myEventArgs ) //fire the event
stubbedFoo.Verify(foo => foo.Bar()); verify Bar is called as a result

However, the above failed, Bar will not be called, apparently because the Foo object is not event constructed. However if I add a line like below:

Mock<Foo> stubbedFoo = new Mock<Foo>(mockEventProvider);
var workAround = stubbedFoo.Object //adding this workaround will work
mockEventProvider.Raise( x => x.MyEvent += null, myEventArgs ) //fire the event
stubbedFoo.Verify(foo => foo.Bar()); verify Bar is called as a result

It will work, because calling get on .Object apparently forces mock to construct the object. Is there a more elegant solution than adding this line ?

1

I don't think you can. I checked out the moq source and poked through it and it doesn't look like the proxy intercepter from castle is actually created until you call .Object. Look at this trace:

public object Object
{
    get { return this.GetObject(); }
}

private object GetObject()
{
    var value = this.OnGetObject();
    this.isInitialized = true;
    return value;
}

Followed by

protected override object OnGetObject()
{
    if (this.instance == null)
    {
        this.InitializeInstance();
    }

    return this.instance;
}

Which does this:

private void InitializeInstance()
{
    PexProtector.Invoke(() =>
    {
        this.instance = proxyFactory.CreateProxy<T>(
            this.Interceptor,
            this.ImplementedInterfaces.ToArray(),
            this.constructorArguments);
    });
}

ProxyFactory actually creates the object and wraps it in a proxy

public T CreateProxy<T>(ICallInterceptor interceptor, Type[] interfaces, object[] arguments)
{
    var mockType = typeof(T);

    if (mockType.IsInterface)
    {
        return (T)generator.CreateInterfaceProxyWithoutTarget(mockType, interfaces, new Interceptor(interceptor));
    }

    try
    {
        return (T)generator.CreateClassProxy(mockType, interfaces, new ProxyGenerationOptions(), arguments, new Interceptor(interceptor));
    }
    catch (TypeLoadException e)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(Resources.InvalidMockClass, e);
    }
    catch (MissingMethodException e)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(Resources.ConstructorNotFound, e);
    }
}
  • I see.. do you think this is a flaw in moq? – Louis Rhys Jan 2 '13 at 3:38
  • I'd say this was probably an intentional decision, but moq is open source so you can change it if you want – devshorts Jan 2 '13 at 19:41

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