2

I came across below note in the book Windows via C-C++ by Jeffrey Richter and Christophe Nasarre.

Examine the following code: V

OID EXEFunc() {
PVOID pv = DLLFunc();
// Access the storage pointed to by pv...
// Assumes that pv is in EXE's C/C++ run-time heap
free(pv);
}
PVOID DLLFunc() {
// Allocate block from DLL's C/C++ run-time heap
return(malloc(100));
}

So, what do you think? Does the preceding code work correctly? Is the block allocated by the DLL's function freed by the EXE's function? The answer is: maybe. The code shown does not give you enough information. If both the EXE and the DLL link to the DLL C/C++ run-time library, the code works just fine. However, if one or both of the modules link to the static C/C++ run-time library, the call to free fails.

I'm not able to understand why call to free would fail here when linking modules with static C runtime.

Can someone explain why free fails? Found similar question here: Memory Allocation in Static vs Dynamic Linking of C Runtime

But I've same doubt here as MrPhilTx: Wouldn't all of the heaps be in the same address space?

Thanks!

5

When both your DLL and EXE are staticly linked to the C runtime the two runtimes simply don't know about each other. So both the EXE and DLL get their own copy of the runtime, their own heap and heap metadata. Neither side knows about the others Metadata and there is no safe way to update the data when you free memory. You end up with inconstant metadata and things will eventually fail (and if your very lucky, it will fail right away).

What this means is that you end up with at least two heaps in your process, and each heap has it's own rules and metadata. There is no way for the EXE to know the exact way the DLL allocates memory so there is no way for it to free it.

As for why you can get away with sharing a heap when everything is dynamically linked, that's easy, there is only one copy of the C Runtime DLL in the process, so if every DLL links against it they will all be calling the same code with the same metadata.

  • 2
    Even if the runtime code linked into the EXE and DLL are the same, the fact that there are separate copies of the metadata messes everything up. Allocating on one heap and freeing to another will cause one big mess. – Mark Ransom Aug 31 '12 at 17:08
3

You can't allocate memory from one allocator and free it with another. Different allocators use different internal implementations and the result of giving a memory block to an allocator that didn't allocate it is unpredictable.

So unless you know for a fact that two sections of code are using the same allocator, you can't allocate memory in one section of code and free it in the other. The usual solution is to ensure the same unit both allocates and frees the memory. In your example, the DLL could offer a "free" function that the main code could call into instead of calling its own free function which frees to its own allocator.

So do this instead:

OID EXEFunc() {
    PVOID pv = DLLFunc();
    // Access the storage pointed to by pv...
    // Assumes that pv is in EXE's C/C++ run-time heap
    DLLFreeFunc(pv);
}

...

PVOID DLLFunc() {
    // Allocate block from DLL's C/C++ run-time heap
    return(malloc(100));
}

DLLFreeFunc(PVOID x) {
    free(x);
}
1

On Linux, a program uses the brk and sbrk system calls to request extra data pages from the kernel. sbrk returns an address pointing to the data segment that can be used by your program.

malloc and free use the data segment returned by brk and sbrk by turning it into a heap. The heaps is a large block of memory in the current porcess's space which small blocks of memory can be requested and returned as required. It is important to note that many calls to malloc and free will make no system calls.

Now when malloc and free want to make use of the heap they need to get a pointer to the heap. This pointer is stored in a separate data segment called static data and is allocated when the application loads. In order to insure that different DLLs (or shared libraries on linux) to no clash with eachother, each DLL has its own static data sections.

Now let us assume that both the dll and the executable are statically linked to their own libraries. In such a case the dll and the executable will have pointers to a different heaps and is such event both dll and executable must free their own memory.

However on linux both the dll and the executable will access malloc and free through a common DLL (libc.so on linux). In such a case, since both the dll and executable are effectively accessing libc's heap, the executable can safely free memory allocated by the dll.

In any event it is good practice for the dll to provide its own free function. This if nothing else documents that the pointer returned by DLLFunc needs to be freed.

I imagine this is true on Windows as well.

  • Can you elaborate or share some links on different heaps in process due to static linking of CRT to Shared Libraries and EXE. I could not find much information. Every where it says only one heap per process. – Abhishek Jain Apr 4 '14 at 11:26
0

The code critically depends on the implementation of malloc and free. A good implementation has no issues, a poor one will indeed fail. It's definitely easier to create a working DLL implementation of malloc and free, but it's far from impossible to do so in a static library.

A trivial example would be a static library which forwards the calls directly to GlobalAlloc and GlobalFree.

  • Do you mean issue occurs here because exe and dll might have linked to two different implementations of malloc/free? – Suhas Aug 31 '12 at 13:11
  • @Suhas: Not really. Having two different implementations is troublesome in its own right, whether you have those in 2 DLLs or 2 static libs. – MSalters Aug 31 '12 at 13:22

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