72

Here is the case: I want to find the elements which match the regex...

targetText = "SomeT1extSomeT2extSomeT3extSomeT4extSomeT5extSomeT6ext"

and I use the regex in javascript like this

reg = new RegExp(/e(.*?)e/g);   
var result = reg.exec(targetText);

and I only get the first one, but not the follow.... I can get the T1 only, but not T2, T3 ... ...

1
  • 3
    Can anyone suggest a for loop way to do it?
    – DNB5brims
    Commented Aug 3, 2009 at 12:34

9 Answers 9

91

function doSomethingWith(result) {
  console.log(result)
}

const targetText = "SomeT1extSomeT2extSomeT3extSomeT4extSomeT5extSomeT6ext"
const reg = /e(.*?)e/g;
let result;
while ((result = reg.exec(targetText)) !== null) {
  doSomethingWith(result);
}

8
  • 8
    Note that the regex must be assigned to an object before using in this manner: /e(.*?)e/.exec(...) will give an infinite loop.
    – ARM
    Commented May 24, 2017 at 18:36
  • 3
    @RaviParekh: did you add the /g modifier?
    – chaos
    Commented Nov 30, 2017 at 15:26
  • 3
    For posterity's sake, the RegExp needs to be declared outside of the while loop; otherwise you'll still get an infinite loop.
    – Native Dev
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 16:04
  • 3
    You can also shorten the while expression: while(result = reg.exec(targetText)) { leveraging the "false" resolve.
    – Native Dev
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 16:10
  • 2
    @Redtopia You must only increment lastIndex manually (reg.lastIndex = result.index + 1;) if you are not using the g (global) flag in your regex. The global flag will automatically move to the next match, however, the disadvantage is that if you want to re-use a global regex, you must reset reg.lastIndex = 0; before you match a new string.
    – Yeti
    Commented Sep 1, 2021 at 11:54
69

Three approaches depending on what you want to do with it:

  • Loop through each match: .match

    targetText.match(/e(.*?)e/g).forEach((element) => {
       // Do something with each element
    });
    
  • Loop through and replace each match on the fly: .replace

    const newTargetText = targetText.replace(/e(.*?)e/g, (match, $1) => {
      // Return the replacement leveraging the parameters.
    });
    
  • Loop through and do something on the fly: .exec

    const regex = /e(.*?)e/g;  // Must be declared outside the while expression, 
                               // and must include the global "g" flag.
    
    let result;
    while(result = regex.exec(targetText)) {
      // Do something with result[0].
    } 
    
5
  • Ironically my Lint wants to put == in place of = in the while expression.
    – Gherman
    Commented Nov 8, 2019 at 15:36
  • To make eslint accept the single = the assignment can be surrounded by parentheses like so: while ((result = regex.exec(targetText)))
    – sheean
    Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 9:22
  • In the second example there, is match a key word or a variable? And if it's a variable what is it holding?
    – Cole Perry
    Commented Jan 22, 2020 at 21:26
  • @ColePerry match is the whole RegExp match, and $1 is the first capture group (), in that example, only one.
    – Native Dev
    Commented Jan 31, 2020 at 22:09
  • 1
    Here, only replace will work, because in Node.js the global match/exec returns only total match without groups.
    – mirik
    Commented Aug 31, 2020 at 16:14
13

Try using match() on the string instead of exec(), though you could loop with exec as well. Match should give you the all the matches at one go. I think you can omit the global specifier as well.

reg = new RegExp(/e(.*?)e/);   
var matches = targetText.match(reg);
6
  • 11
    Don't link to w3schools. They are unaffiliated with W3C and have a lot of wrong information. See w3fools.com.
    – dbkaplun
    Commented Jun 24, 2012 at 5:21
  • 8
    @MindVirus - if you'd bother to check, they've cleaned up a lot of the stuff that w3fools.com pointed out. I still use them as a quick, though not definitive, resource. Much like one might use a cheat sheet over K&R C to look up something simple.
    – tvanfosson
    Commented Jun 24, 2012 at 13:34
  • 1
    As an intermediate dev, I've already encountered a good half dozen clear errors at w3schools. They're off my party list. Commented Jul 18, 2013 at 0:17
  • 2
    MDN reference for String.prototype.matchdeveloper.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Commented Dec 7, 2015 at 9:56
  • 3
    the difference is that you don't get the captured groups with String.match, while RegExp.exec does.
    – Vitim.us
    Commented May 23, 2018 at 19:11
4

I kept getting infinite loops while following the advice above, for example:

var reg = /e(.*?)e/g;
var result;
while((result = reg.exec(targetText)) !== null) {
    doSomethingWith(result);
}

The object that was assigned to result each time was:

["", "", index: 50, input: "target text", groups: undefined]

So in my case I edited the above code to:

const reg = /e(.*?)e/g;
let result = reg.exec(targetText);
while(result[0] !== "") {
    doSomethingWith(result);
    result = reg.exec(targetText);
}
1
  • that's because of the regex. you have let to accept empty strings by putting a question mark
    – JSBach
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 3:49
2
targetText = "SomeT1extSomeT2extSomeT3extSomeT4extSomeT5extSomeT6ext"    
reg = new RegExp(/e(.*?)e/g);   
var result;
while (result = reg.exec(targetText))
{
    ...
}
1
  • It doesn't work. In JS regex cannot extract groups with global flag, so the user will receive only total match.
    – mirik
    Commented Aug 31, 2020 at 16:11
1

You could also use the String.replace method to loop through all elements.

result = [];
 // Just get all numbers
"SomeT1extSomeT2extSomeT3ext".replace(/(\d+?)/g, function(wholeMatch, num) {
  // act here or after the loop...
  console.log(result.push(num));
  return wholeMatch;
});
console.log(result); // ['1', '2', '3']

Greetings

1

I did this in a console session (Chrome).

> let reg = /[aeiou]/g;
undefined
> let text = "autoeciously";
undefined
> matches = text.matches(reg);
(7) ["a", "u", "o", "e", "i", "o", "u"]
> matches.forEach(x =>console.log(x));
a
u
o
e
i
o
u
0

Although @tvanfosson suggested in his answer, I'm adding the modified version for someone who only needs to get all matchings.

var targetText = "SomeT1extSomeT2extSomeT3extSomeT4extSomeT5extSomeT6ext";
var reg = /e(.*?)e/g;
var ss = targetText.match(reg); // ss = "eT1e,eT2e,eT3e,eT4e,eT5e,eT6e"
-1

I was actually dealing with this issue. I prefer Lambda functions for about everything.

reg = /e(.*?)e/gm;   
targetText.match(reg).forEach(element => console.log(element));
1
  • this only found the first match. Commented Oct 2, 2020 at 18:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.