85

I am trying to solve equivalent binary trees exercise on go tour. Here is what I did;

package main

import "tour/tree"
import "fmt"

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t.Left != nil {
        Walk(t.Left, ch)
    }
    ch <- t.Value
    if t.Right != nil {
        Walk(t.Right, ch)
    }

}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for k := range ch1 {
        select {
        case g := <-ch2:
            if k != g {
                return false
            }
        default:
            break
        }
    }
    return true
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}

However, I couldn't find out how to signal if any no more elements left in trees. I can't use close(ch) on Walk() because it makes the channel close before all values are sent (because of recursion.) Can anyone lend me a hand here?

7
  • 1
    I've read that like six times and still don't understand. Why do you need to signal that there are no more elements left in the tree? Sep 1, 2012 at 0:57
  • 1
    @FrankieTheKneeMan To break out the infinite for loop. Currently, for loop only finishes if any of the elements are different.
    – yasar
    Sep 1, 2012 at 0:59
  • Right, because it hangs on a channel. Sep 1, 2012 at 1:01
  • @FrankieTheKneeMan Yes, how do I make so that it won't hang on channel?
    – yasar
    Sep 1, 2012 at 1:03
  • 1
    @yasar11732 You just need to remove the default case, have a look at my proposed solution here (Also, I use a Walk function similar to the one presented here)
    – tokou
    Jul 27, 2013 at 9:45

31 Answers 31

144

An elegant solution using closure was presented in the golang-nuts group,

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    defer close(ch) // <- closes the channel when this function returns
    var walk func(t *tree.Tree)
    walk = func(t *tree.Tree) {
        if t == nil {
            return
        }
        walk(t.Left)
        ch <- t.Value
        walk(t.Right)
    }
    walk(t)
}
12
  • 8
    It's implicit in the problem definition that you're comparing whether two binary search trees contain the same multiset of elements, and while an in-order of a BST will give you the elements in sorted order, the same is not true of any other traversal. E.g. the tree ¹\₂ has preorder 12 while the tree ₁/² has preorder 21, despite that both contain the same elements.
    – daveagp
    Sep 11, 2015 at 21:57
  • 5
    Also this is maybe just me being grumpy, but I don't know if this is much more elegant than having a second recursive helper function, but I applaud the idiomatic use of defer.
    – daveagp
    Sep 11, 2015 at 21:58
  • 10
    Nice answer, but why "defer close(ch)", why not simply write close(ch) as the last statement of the function? That seems to work fine as well.
    – marczoid
    Nov 12, 2015 at 13:03
  • 19
    You could write it at the end, but the defer close(ch) is idiomatic Go. Basically, you put it right where you create / start using the channel to not forget about it. It's also better in error-handling cases.
    – zahanm
    Nov 17, 2015 at 17:06
  • 4
    don't we have here a goroutine leak ? given that the different size of two trees, we will break in the Same function and will leave possibly both channels (ch1,ch2) undrained because no one will read values from them.
    – Oleg
    Mar 21, 2019 at 13:15
48

Here's the full solution using ideas here and from the Google Group thread

package main

import "fmt"
import "code.google.com/p/go-tour/tree"

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    var walker func(t *tree.Tree)
    walker = func (t *tree.Tree) {
        if (t == nil) {
            return
        }
        walker(t.Left)
        ch <- t.Value
        walker(t.Right)
    }
    walker(t)
    close(ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)

    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for {
        v1,ok1 := <- ch1
        v2,ok2 := <- ch2

        if v1 != v2 || ok1 != ok2 {
            return false
        }

        if !ok1 {
            break
        }
    }

    return true
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println("1 and 1 same: ", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println("1 and 2 same: ", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))

}
5
  • 1
    In function Same, because of the break statement when we finish reading from channel ch1, we would return true when t1 is a sub-tree of t2?
    – Hieu Phan
    Jul 8, 2018 at 9:36
  • 1
    @Hieu Phan: close, it took me a bit of time to figure out why the break is needed. the break statement is only going to be hit when comparing identical trees. in all other cases the v1!=v2 block will be hit first. In the case of identical trees, every value will match, so we need to break out of the forever loop when we get to the end of either tree. You could write this as if !ok1 || !ok2{break} but because this condition can only be reached at the end of identical trees, we only need to do a !ok -> break on one channel (since both ch will be closed at the same time) Sep 30, 2018 at 5:52
  • 1
    "if v1 != v2 || ok1 != ok2 {" should be replaced with "if ok1 != ok2 || v1 != v2" otherwise there is a bug if second channel ended (closed) and v2 == 0 (default value) and the first channel contains and returns v1 == 0 value.
    – TOL
    Nov 3, 2019 at 21:10
  • 1
    @TOL Are you sure? Expected: the predicate should be true, and it should return false. "v1 != v2" is false and "ok1 != ok2" is true. "v1 != v2 || ok1 != ok2" is true, and "ok1 != ok2 || v1 != v2" is true, so it behaves as same way. In general, "a || b" is same to "b || a", if a and b are simple value. Which kind of bug did you expect in this?
    – Seong
    Jul 11, 2020 at 13:11
  • You can substitute the break for a return true and omit the outer return true. The compiler is apparently smart enough to deduce that all branches are covered, which is awesome and something I did not expect.
    – Boris B.
    Apr 26, 2022 at 13:43
35

You could use close() if your Walk function doesn't recurse on itself. i.e. Walk would just do:

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    walkRecurse(t, ch)
    close(ch)
}

Where walkRecurse is more or less your current Walk function, but recursing on walkRecurse. (or you rewrite Walk to be iterative - which, granted, is more hassle) With this approach, your Same() function have to learn that the channels was closed, which is done with the channel receive of the form

k, ok1 := <-ch
g, ok2 := <-ch

And take proper action when ok1 and ok2 are different, or when they're both false

Another way, but probably not in the spirit of the exercise, is to count the number of nodes in the tree:

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    countT1 := countTreeNodes(t1)
    countT2 := countTreeNodes(t2)
    if countT1 != countT2 {
        return false
    }
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for i := 0; i < countT1; i++ {
        if <-ch1 != <-ch2 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}

You'll have to implement the countTreeNodes() function, which should count the number of nodes in a *Tree

1
  • The Same function is incorrect and should not rely on counting nodes. If the first pair of values do not match, an immediate false reply is possible.
    – よつば
    Mar 7, 2022 at 2:04
20

This is how I did it, the difference is that you can wrap Walk into anonymous function and defer close(ch) inside it. Thus you have not to define other named recursive function

package main

import (
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
    "fmt"
)
// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t == nil {
        return
    }
    Walk(t.Left, ch)
    ch <- t.Value
    Walk(t.Right, ch)
}
// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go func() {
        defer close(ch1)
        Walk(t1, ch1)
    }()
    go func() {
        defer close(ch2)
        Walk(t2, ch2)
    }()
    for {
        v1, ok1 := <- ch1
        v2, ok2 := <- ch2
        if ok1 != ok2 || v1 != v2 {
            return false
        }
        if !ok1 && !ok2 {
            break
        }
    }
    return true
}

func main() {
    ch := make(chan int)
    go func () {
        defer close(ch)
        Walk(tree.New(3), ch)
    }()
    for i := range ch {
        fmt.Println(i)
    }

    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(10), tree.New(10)))
}
13

While my first intuition was to also wrap the recursive walk and closing the channels, I felt it was not in the spirit of the exercise.

The exercise text contains the following information:

The function tree.New(k) constructs a randomly-structured (but always sorted) binary tree holding the values k, 2k, 3k, ..., 10k.

Which clearly states that the resulting trees have exactly 10 nodes.

Therefore, in the spirit and simplicity of this exercise, I went with the following solution:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t.Left != nil {
        Walk(t.Left, ch)
    }
    ch <- t.Value
    if t.Right != nil {
        Walk(t.Right, ch)
    }
}

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)

    defer close(ch1)
    defer close(ch2)

    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        if <-ch1 != <-ch2 {
            return false
        }
    }

    return true
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}

If the goal would be to run on arbitrarily sized trees, then reacting to closed channels is the better solution, but I felt this was a simple exercise with intentionally put constraints to make it easier for the new Gopher.

3
  • 1
    So happy to see someone else digging into the clearly stated parameters of the exercise. The other, over-engineered, stuff is fun to learn from, too, especially the different ways of managing closing the channel... even if it's 100% not necessary.
    – Zach Young
    Jun 18, 2022 at 4:21
  • Thank you! This is the only answer that is coded at the proper difficulty for the time this excercise appears in "A Tour of Go".
    – RcoderNY
    Oct 6, 2022 at 4:22
  • 1
    Is the close here safe? the tour does state that the receiver should never close a channel, which appears to be what you're doing here?
    – wds
    Sep 14, 2023 at 12:07
9

This is my solution.

package main

import (
  "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
  "fmt"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t == nil {
        return
    }
    
    Walk(t.Left, ch)
    ch <- t.Value
    Walk(t.Right, ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1,ch2 := make(chan int),make(chan int)
    
    go func() {
        Walk(t1, ch1)
        close(ch1)
    }()
    
    go func() {
        Walk(t2, ch2)
        close(ch2)
    }()
    
    for {
        v1, ok1 := <- ch1
        v2, ok2 := <- ch2
        
        if ok1 == false && ok2 == false {
            return true
        }
        
        if v1 != v2 {
            return false
        }
    }

    return false
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1))) 
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2))) 
}

1
  • 1
    if ch1 is closed and ch2 is still open (because t2 contains more elements), there is a runtime nil comparison of v1 != v2. Consider updating to if ok1 == false || ok2 == false || v1 != v2 ...
    – よつば
    Mar 7, 2022 at 1:52
5

Use goroutine with an anonymous function

go func() {
    .... // logic
    close(ch)// last close channel or defer close channel
    // do not use close() outside of goroutine
}()

Here's code which can read easy

Walk func

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t.Left != nil {
        Walk(t.Left, ch)
    }
    ch <- t.Value
    if t.Right != nil {
        Walk(t.Right, ch)
    }
}

Same func

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)

    go func() {
        Walk(t1, ch1)
        close(ch1)
        }()
    }()


    go func() {
        Walk(t2, ch2)
        close(ch2)
        }()
    }()

    for {
        v1, ok1 := <- ch1
        v2, ok2 := <- ch2
    
        if !ok1 && !ok2 {
            // both closed at the same time (and all values until now were equal)
            return true
        }
    
        if !ok1 || !ok2 || v1 != v2 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}

main func

func main() {
    c := make(chan int)
    t1 := tree.New(1)
    go func() {
        Walk(t1, c)
        close(c)
    }()

    for i := range c {
        fmt.Print(i) // 12345678910
    }

    fmt.Println("")
    result1 := Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1))
    fmt.Println(result1) // true
    result2 := Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2))
    fmt.Println(result2) // false
}
4

This is my solution. It properly checks for differences in the length of the two sequences.

package main

import "code.google.com/p/go-tour/tree"
import "fmt"

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    var walker func (t *tree.Tree)
    walker = func (t *tree.Tree) {
        if t.Left != nil {
            walker(t.Left)
        }
        ch <- t.Value
        if t.Right != nil {
            walker(t.Right)
        }
    }
    walker(t)
    close(ch)
}

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    chana := make (chan int)
    chanb := make (chan int)

    go Walk(t1, chana)
    go Walk(t2, chanb)

    for {
        n1, ok1 := <-chana
        n2, ok2 := <-chanb        
        if n1 != n2 || ok1 != ok2 {
            return false
        }
        if (!ok1) {
            break
        }
    }
    return true; 
}
3

You got it almost right, there's no need to use the select statement because you will go through the default case too often, here's my solution that works without needing to count the number of nodes in the tress:

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for i := range ch1 {
        j, more := <-ch2
        if more {
            if i != j { return false }
        } else { return false }
    }

    return true
}
2
  • 7
    Your solution isn't correct. If ch2 has more elements than ch1, then it will return true. You should check at the end if ch2 has more elements
    – Marco
    Jan 18, 2014 at 21:50
  • instead of returning pure true, maybe adding this? _, ok := <-ch2 return !ok May 26, 2017 at 14:38
2

All of previous answers do not solve the task about Same function. The question is:

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same2(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool

It shouldn't consider structure of tree. That's why following tests fail, gives us false in both lines:

fmt.Println("Should return true:", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
fmt.Println("Should return false:", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))

Remember?

The function tree.New(k) constructs a randomly-structured (but always sorted) binary tree holding the values k, 2k, 3k, ..., 10k.

You need just check that both trees have the same values. And task description clearly notice that:

Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)) should return true, and Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)) should return false.

So to solve the task you need buffer all results from one tree and check does the values from second tree are in the first one.

Here is my solution, it's not ideal one :) :

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    var tv1 = []int{}

    for v := range ch1 {
        tv1 = append(tv1, v)
    }

    inArray := func(arr []int, value int) bool {
        for a := range arr {
            if arr[a] == value {
                return true
            }
        }
        return false
    }

    for v2 := range ch2 {
        if !inArray(tv1, v2) {
            return false
        }
    }

    return true
}
2
package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t != nil {
        Walk(t.Left, ch)
        ch <- t.Value
        Walk(t.Right, ch)
    }
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go func() { Walk(t1, ch1); close(ch1) }()
    go func() { Walk(t2, ch2); close(ch2) }()
    for v1 := range ch1 {
        if v1 != <-ch2 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(2), tree.New(1)))
}
3
  • 3
    While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. Apr 8, 2020 at 22:19
  • while creating a goroutine, we need to explicitly handle (close) the channels that it uses to produce or consume. because select or range does not know if the channel that is used inside a routine is alive or finished. If a routine is completed, it will throw an error. So, we have to manually close the channels that the routines use. Note* by default select and range listen's only to channels that are active
    – Mukundhan
    Apr 12, 2020 at 18:50
  • 1
    this answer incorrectly assumes that ch1 and ch2 will have the same amount of elements.
    – よつば
    Mar 7, 2022 at 1:56
1

Tried to solve this problem using map structure.

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    countMap := make(map[int]int)
    ch := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch)
    for v := range ch {
        countMap[v]++
    }
    ch = make(chan int)
    go Walk(t2, ch)
    for v := range ch {
        countMap[v]--
        if countMap[v] < 0 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}
1
  • There's no sense of using channels and goroutines in your example
    – Bars
    Jun 21, 2022 at 21:13
1
package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    walkRecursive(t, ch)
    close(ch)
}

func walkRecursive(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t == nil {
        return
    }
    walkRecursive(t.Left, ch)
    ch <- t.Value
    walkRecursive(t.Right, ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for {
        v1, ok1 := <-ch1
        v2, ok2 := <-ch2
        if ok1 != ok2 {
            return false
        }
        if !ok1 {
            return true
        }
        if v1 != v2 {
            return false
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}

1
  • I came up with a similar solution, but shouldn't if !ok1 be changed to if !ok1 || !ok2 for reliable behavior when tree 1 has more elements? Dec 29, 2023 at 3:25
1

Here's a non-recursive solution (i.e. won't have stack space issues on large inputs) that also does not require a separate visited map - it just uses a single Stack data structure. The trick to avoiding a visited map is to remove the visited entries from the stack and instead create new tree.Tree instances for the visited entries, with the Left side removed so it doesn't revisit the left side.

package main

import "fmt"
import "golang.org/x/tour/tree"

func Pop(stack []*tree.Tree) (*tree.Tree, []*tree.Tree) {
    last := len(stack) - 1
    node := stack[last]
    stack[last] = nil
    return node, stack[:last]
}

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    defer close(ch)
    stack := []*tree.Tree{t}
    var node *tree.Tree
    for len(stack) > 0 {
        node, stack = Pop(stack)
        if node.Left != nil {
            stack = append(stack, &tree.Tree{nil, node.Value, node.Right}, node.Left)
            continue
        }

        ch <- node.Value

        if node.Right != nil {
            stack = append(stack, node.Right)
        }
    }
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for {
        v1, ok1 := <-ch1
        v2, ok2 := <-ch2
        if v1 != v2 {
            return false
        }
        if !ok1 || !ok2 {
            return ok1 == ok2
        }
    }
}

func PrintTree(t *tree.Tree) {
    ch := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t, ch)
    for i := range ch {
        fmt.Printf("%d ", i)
    }
    fmt.Println()
}

func main() {
    PrintTree(tree.New(1))
    PrintTree(&tree.Tree{Value: 1, Right: &tree.Tree{Value: 2}})

    fmt.Println("1 and 2 same (false): ", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
    fmt.Println("1 and 1 same (true): ", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println("empty same (true): ", Same(&tree.Tree{}, &tree.Tree{}))
    fmt.Println("diff length same (false): ", Same(&tree.Tree{Value: 1}, &tree.Tree{Value: 2, Left: &tree.Tree{Value: 2}}))
}

The output is:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
1 2 
1 and 2 same (false):  false
1 and 1 same (true):  true
empty same (true):  true
diff length same (false):  false
1

This can be solved using an iterative approach (which will save on memory). Using an iterative approach based on this example:

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    stack := make([]*tree.Tree, 0)
    for {
        if t != nil {
            stack = append(stack, t)
            t = t.Left
        } else if(len(stack) > 0) {
            lastIndex := len(stack) - 1
            t = stack[lastIndex]
            stack = stack[:lastIndex]
            
            ch <- t.Value
            
            t = t.Right
        } else {
            close(ch)
            return
        }
    }
}
0

You should avoid to let opened channels unattended or a thread can be waiting forever and never ending.

package main

import "code.google.com/p/go-tour/tree"
import "fmt"

func WalkRecurse(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t == nil {
        return
    }

    WalkRecurse(t.Left, ch)
    ch <- t.Value
    WalkRecurse(t.Right, ch)
}

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    WalkRecurse(t, ch)
    close(ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    var ch1, ch2 chan int = make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    ret := true
    for {
        v1, ok1 := <- ch1
        v2, ok2 := <- ch2

        if ok1 != ok2 {
            ret = false
        }
        if ok1 && (v1 != v2) {
            ret = false
        }
        if !ok1 && !ok2 {
            break
        }
    }

    return ret
}

func main() {
    ch := make(chan int)
    go Walk(tree.New(1), ch)
    for v := range ch {
        fmt.Print(v, " ")
    }
    fmt.Println()

    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}
0

My version

package main


import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func WalkRec(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t == nil {
        return
    }
    WalkRec(t.Left, ch)
    ch <- t.Value
    WalkRec(t.Right, ch)
}

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    WalkRec(t, ch)
    close(ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for {
        x, okx := <-ch1
        y, oky := <-ch2
        switch {
        case okx != oky:
            return false
        case x != y:
            return false
        case okx == oky && okx == false:
            return true
        }

    }

}

func main() {
    ch := make(chan int)
    go Walk(tree.New(1), ch)
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(2), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}
0

I wrote 2 versions that always read both channels to the end:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    var walker func(t *tree.Tree)
    walker = func(t *tree.Tree) {
        if t == nil {
            return
        }
        walker(t.Left)
        ch <- t.Value
        walker(t.Right)
    }
    walker(t)
    close(ch)
}

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree, sameChan func(ch1, ch2 chan int) bool) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    return sameChan(ch1, ch2)
}

func sameChan1(ch1, ch2 chan int) bool {
    areSame := true
    for {
        v1, ok1 := <-ch1
        v2, ok2 := <-ch2

        if !ok1 && !ok2 {
            return areSame
        }

        if !ok1 || !ok2 || v1 != v2 {
            areSame = false
        }
    }
}

func sameChan2(ch1, ch2 chan int) bool {
    areSame := true
    for v1 := range ch1 {
        v2, ok2 := <-ch2

        if !ok2 || v1 != v2 {
            areSame = false
        }
    }
    for _ = range ch2 {
        areSame = false
    }
    return areSame
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1), sameChan1))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(2), tree.New(1), sameChan1))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2), sameChan1))

    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1), sameChan2))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(2), tree.New(1), sameChan2))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2), sameChan2))
}
0

because the question just said the tree just 10 nodes,then following is my answer after read other answers:

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    defer close(ch)

    var walker func(t *tree.Tree)
    walker = func(t *tree.Tree) {
        if t == nil {
            return
        }

        walker(t.Left)
        ch <- t.Value
        walker(t.Right)
    }
    walker(t)
}

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for range make([]struct{}, 10) {
        if <-ch1 != <-ch2 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}
0

For whoever interested, if you wonder how to solve this without creating a separate recursive function, here is an answer using a stack:

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    defer close(ch)
    visitStack := []*tree.Tree{t}
    visited := make(map[*tree.Tree]bool, 1)
    for len(visitStack) > 0 {
        var n *tree.Tree
        n, visitStack = visitStack[len(visitStack)-1], visitStack[:len(visitStack)-1]
        if visited[n] {
            ch <- n.Value
            continue
        }
        if n.Right != nil {
            visitStack = append(visitStack, n.Right)
        }
        visitStack = append(visitStack, n)
        if n.Left != nil {
            visitStack = append(visitStack, n.Left)
        }
        visited[n] = true
    }
}
0

A clear answer:

package main

import "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
import "fmt"

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t == nil {
        return
    }
    Walk(t.Left, ch)
    ch <- t.Value
    Walk(t.Right, ch)
}

func WalkATree(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    Walk(t, ch)
    close(ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)
    go WalkATree(t1, ch1)
    go WalkATree(t2, ch2)
    var v1, v2 int
    var ok1, ok2 bool
    for {
        v1, ok1 = <- ch1
        v2, ok2 = <- ch2
        if !ok1 && !ok2 {
            return true
        }
        if !ok1 && ok2 || ok1 && !ok2 {
            return false
        }
        if v1 != v2 {
            return false
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
}
1
  • This solution always will be true. Cause tree.New will produce different values with the same length. Test: fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
    – fmassica
    Jan 30, 2019 at 21:17
0

Here's a solution that doesn't depend on differing tree lengths, neither does it depend on traversal order:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    var walk func(*tree.Tree)
    walk = func(tr *tree.Tree) {
        if tr == nil {
            return
        }

        walk(tr.Left)
        ch <- tr.Value
        walk(tr.Right)
    }

    walk(t)
    close(ch)
}

func merge(ch chan int, m map[int]int) {
    for i := range ch {
        count, ok := m[i]
        if ok {
            m[i] = count + 1
        } else {
            m[i] = 1
        }
    }
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int, 100)
    ch2 := make(chan int, 100)
    m := make(map[int]int)

    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    merge(ch1, m)
    merge(ch2, m)

    for _, count := range m {
        if count != 2 {
            return false
        }
    }

    return true
}
0

That's how I did it using Inorder Traversal

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t != nil {
        Walk(t.Left, ch)
        ch <- t.Value
        Walk(t.Right, ch)
    }
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    c1, c2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, c1)
    go Walk(t2, c2)
    if <-c1 == <-c2 {
        return true
    } else {
        return false
    }
}

func main() {
    t1 := tree.New(1)
    t2 := tree.New(8)
    fmt.Println("the two trees are same?", Same(t1, t2))
}
1
  • 2
    The Same() method is only picking up the first values entered into the channel, the lowest values in the binary tree, ignoring everything else in the binary tree Sep 21, 2016 at 17:57
0

Here's my solution, without the defer magic. I thought this would be a bit easier to read, so it would worth sharing :)

Bonus: This version actually solves the problem in the tour's exercise and gives proper results.

package main

import (
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
    "fmt"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    walkRecursive(t, ch)
    close(ch)
}

func walkRecursive(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t != nil {
        walkRecursive(t.Left, ch)
        ch <- t.Value
        walkRecursive(t.Right, ch)
    }
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    var br bool
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for i:= range ch1 {
        if i == <-ch2 {
            br = true
        } else {
            br = false
            break
        }
    }
    return br
}

func main() {
    ch := make(chan int)
    go Walk(tree.New(1), ch)

    for i := range ch {
        fmt.Println(i)
    }

    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(2), tree.New(1)))
}

So the output is as follows:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
false
true
false
0

Haven't seen it so far in this thread. I used the nil channel technique presented in just for func

The issue with closing the channels was solved by kicking them off in an goroutine iife.

I think I could check more performant for equality though.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
    "sort"

    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    ch <- t.Value
    if t.Right != nil {
        Walk(t.Right, ch)
    }
    if t.Left != nil {
        Walk(t.Left, ch)
    }

}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {

    c1 := make(chan int)
    s1 := []int{}

    go func() {
        Walk(t1, c1)
        close(c1)
    }()

    c2 := make(chan int)
    s2 := []int{}

    go func() {
        Walk(t2, c2)
        close(c2)
    }()

    for c1 != nil || c2 != nil {
        select {
        case v, ok := <-c1:
            if !ok {
                c1 = nil
                sort.Ints(s1)
                continue
            }
            s1 = append(s1, v)
        case v, ok := <-c2:
            if !ok {
                c2 = nil
                sort.Ints(s2)
                continue
            }
            s2 = append(s2, v)
        }
    }
    return reflect.DeepEqual(s1, s2)
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
}
0

How about just change count of incoming arguments by a little?

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int, recursion bool) {
    if t != nil {
        ch <- t.Value
        Walk(t.Left, ch, true)
        Walk(t.Right, ch, true)
    }
    
    if !recursion {
        close(ch)
    }
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    t1_map := map[int]int{}
    t2_map := map[int]int{}
    t1_ch := make(chan int)
    t2_ch := make(chan int)
    
    go Walk(t1, t1_ch, false)
    go Walk(t2, t2_ch, false)
    
    for value := range t1_ch {
        t1_map[value]++
    }
    
    for value := range t2_ch {
        t2_map[value]++
    }
    
    if len(t1_map) != len(t2_map) {
        return false
    }
    
    for t1_key, t1_value := range t1_map {
        t2_value, t2_exists := t2_map[t1_key]
        
        if (!t2_exists) || (t1_value != t2_value) {
            return false
        }
    }
    
    return true
}

func main() {
    t1 := tree.New(1)
    t2 := tree.New(2)
    t3 := tree.New(1)
    
    fmt.Println(Same(t1, t2))
    fmt.Println(Same(t1, t3))
    fmt.Println(Same(t3, t2))
}
0

In the author's case, they should just change the Same function to avoid an infinite loop:

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)

    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    if <-ch1 != <-ch2 {
        return false
    }

    return true
}
1
  • This just checks the first values of the 2 tree walk, which accomplishes nothing!!
    – Samveen
    Jan 10, 2022 at 7:21
0

If one is using recursive calls with one's Walk logic and one wishes to signal channel-consumers that there are no more items, it seems that one can put the majority of one's Walk logic into a second function, invoke that second function, wait for it to complete, then close the channel.

In the example below, the second ("inner Walk") function is a "closure" directly inside the Walk function, but it needn't be.

package main

import "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
import "fmt"

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    defer close(ch)
    var iw func(*tree.Tree)
    iw = func(it *tree.Tree) {
        if it == nil {
            return
        }
        iw(it.Left)
        ch <- it.Value
        iw(it.Right)
    }
    iw(t)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for {
        v1, more1 := <- ch1
        v2, more2 := <- ch2
        if (!more1 && !more2) {
            return true
        }
        if more1 != more2 || v1 != v2 {
            return false
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}
0

Adding my solution for others to reference. Not adding a lot of explanations as it is pretty similar to several others well described here. Hope it helps though. In any case, being able to compare our different approaches to these exercises is just great!

Also, you can try it code in Go playground

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    defer close(ch)
    var walkinto func(t *tree.Tree)
    walkinto = func(t *tree.Tree) {
        if t == nil {
            return
        }
        walkinto(t.Left)
        ch <- t.Value
        walkinto(t.Right)
    }
    walkinto(t)
}

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)

    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for i := range ch1 {
        if i != <-ch2 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}

func main() {
    fmt.Printf("Positive result. Expecting true: %v\n", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Printf("Negative result. Expecting false: %v\n", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}
0

See demo on the Go Playground: https://go.dev/play/p/MrsAWvkavlL

package main

import (
    "fmt"

    "golang.org/x/tour/tree"
)

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t == nil {
        return
    }

    
    // inorder traversal
    Walk(t.Left, ch)
    ch <- t.Value // This let's us pass the value to the channel at the right time
    Walk(t.Right, ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {

    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)

    go func() {
        Walk(t1, ch1)
        close(ch1) // Need to close channel to prevent deadlock
    }()

    go func() {
        Walk(t2, ch2)
        close(ch2) // Need to close channel to prevent deadlock
    }()

    // since values come inorder we can block and check each value
    if <- ch1 != <-ch2 {
        return false
    }


    return true

}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}
2
  • It looks like this only compares the first two values in ch1 and ch2, since there is no for loop to iterate through all the elements Dec 29, 2023 at 3:34
  • No for loop is needed. The trick is <- ch1 != <-ch2.
    – Mudassir
    Jan 20 at 22:30

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