Question

total GPU time + total CPU overhead is smaller than the total execution time. Why?

Detail

I am studying how frequent global memory access and kernel launch may affect the performance and I have designed a code which has multiple small kernels and ~0.1 million kernel calls in total. Each kernel reads data from global memory, processes them and then writes back to the global memory. As expected, the code runs much slower than the original design which has only one large kernel and very few kernel launches.

The problem arose as I used command line profiler to get "gputime" (execution time for the GPU kernel or memory copy method) and "cputime" (CPU overhead for non-blocking method, the sum of gputime and CPU overhead for blocking method ). To my understanding, the sum of all gputimes and all cputimes should exceed the entire execution time (the last "gpuendtimestamp" minus the first "gpustarttimestamp"), but it turns out the contrary is true (sum of gputimes=13.835064 s, sum of cputimes=4.547344 s, total time=29.582793). Between the end of one kernel and the start of the next, there is often a large amount of waiting time, larger than the CPU overhead of the next kernel. Most of the kernels suffer from this problem are: memcpyDtoH, memcpyDtoD and thrust internel functions such as launch_closure_by_value, fast_scan, etc. What is the probable reason?

System Windows 7, TCC driver, VS 2010, CUDA 4.2

Thanks for your help!

  • 2
    This is probably a combination of profiling, which increases latency, and the Windows WDDM subsystem. To overcome the high latency of the latter, the CUDA driver batches GPU operations and submits them in groups with a single Windows kernel call. This can cause large periods of GPU inactivity if CUDA API commands are sitting in an unsubmitted batch. – talonmies Sep 1 '12 at 11:29
  • Thanks, @talonmies. I just checked the gpu setup with smi and found the driver mode had already been in TCC. I also ran the executable alone with environment variable COMPUTE_PROFILE=0, and the total execution time remained the same XS. – King Crimson Sep 1 '12 at 22:19
  • not mentioning that you are using the TCC driver is a pretty big omission in your question. I develop with Linux, there profiling adds 15-40% extra execution time compared to running without profiling. Much of the extra time is idle GPU time while events are processed by the driver and counters set, read and reset. – talonmies Sep 2 '12 at 6:51
  • This question is now 3.5 years old - no code or serious profiling data was ever provided and it is impossible to provide a useful answer based on what was posted in 2012. I have voted to close it for these reasons. – talonmies Jan 25 '16 at 8:53

This is probably a combination of profiling, which increases latency, and the Windows WDDM subsystem. To overcome the high latency of the latter, the CUDA driver batches GPU operations and submits them in groups with a single Windows kernel call. This can cause large periods of GPU inactivity if CUDA API commands are sitting in an unsubmitted batch.

(Copied @talonmies' comment to an answer, to enable voting and accepting.)

  • 2
    The CUDA driver batches requests on WDDM. The next version of Nsight Visual Studio Edition will show this behavior. In addition the tools do add overhead (~1µs per API call and ~5-15µus per launch). For kernel launches the time shown is only the time the kernel executed. This does not include setup overhead. Setup time is related to the number of parameters you pass (up to 4KB on CC 2.0+), texture/surface bindings, and the number of state changes (e.g. cache configuration). Nsight VSE and Visual Profiler 5.0 are more accurate and have less overhead than the CUDA command line profiler. – Greg Smith Sep 1 '12 at 21:47
  • isn't the setup overhead already included in the cputime reported by the command line profiler? Now I still don't quite understand why gputime(only the kernel execution time on gpu) + cputime (overhead) < total execution time. – King Crimson Sep 2 '12 at 0:49
  • 1
    @KingCrimson cputime as reported by the command line profiler includes most of the time spent in the Driver API (not CUDA Runtime API). In addition to CPU overhead there is overhead not accounted for on the GPU side (not in gputime). You can observe this by simply increasing the number of parameters passed to each launch. The command line profiler will dump records every 128 to 256 tasks. This will add to the cpu overhead. I recommend you use Nsight VSE as the overhead is less and the timeline shows overhead associated with tool. – Greg Smith Sep 2 '12 at 4:18
  • @KingCrimson If you post your code I can run a trace and provide you additional information. – Greg Smith Sep 2 '12 at 4:19
  • Thanks a lot @GregSmith. I will ask my supervisor if the code is allowed to be posted. BTW, I just used Nsight VSE and the latest nvprof to run the trace again. The timing result (total kernel execution time, total execution time) is the same with that produced by command line profiler. To complicate the situation, some of the device-to-device mem copy time reported by Nsight VSE was negative value. Maybe some counter was somehow overflowed. – King Crimson Sep 2 '12 at 4:39

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