6

I am trying to selectively delete records from a SQL Server 2005 table without looping through a cursor. The table can contain many records (sometimes > 500,000) so looping is too slow.

Data:

ID, UnitID, Day, Interval, Amount

1   100     10   21        9.345

2   100     10   22        9.367

3   200     11   21        4.150

4   300     11   21        4.350

5   300     11   22        4.734

6   300     11   23        5.106

7   400     13   21       10.257

8   400     13   22       10.428

Key is: ID, UnitID, Day, Interval.

In this example I wish to delete Records 2, 5 and 8 - they are adjacent to an existing record (based on the key).

Note: record 6 would not be deleted because once 5 is gone it is not adjacent any longer.

Am I asking too much?

5
  • 1
    I'm not positive, but a set doesn't understand "adjacency" from what I recall from set theory. This may need to be done with a cursor. Aug 3, 2009 at 15:04
  • 1
    How do you decide which rows to delete? What is the criteria, based on what field(s)?
    – marc_s
    Aug 3, 2009 at 15:04
  • It appears to be "sequential order" based upon the key. Aug 3, 2009 at 15:08
  • 1
    Yes, but how do I know to delete record no. 2 and 5, but not 6 ? I could select all rows with the same (UnitID, Day) values and delete all but one - but that would delete records #5 and #6 (since #4 already is (300,11) .......
    – marc_s
    Aug 3, 2009 at 15:12
  • Please define adjacency. Can two rows with different UnitIDs be adjacent? Can two rows with differenct days be adjacent, for example Day 1, and max allowed interval with day 2 min allowed interval? Aug 3, 2009 at 16:41

5 Answers 5

4

See these articles in my blog for performance detail:


The main idea for the query below is that we should delete all even rows from continuous ranges of intervals.

That is, if for given (unitId, Day) we have the following intervals:

1
2
3
4
6
7
8
9

, we have two continuous ranges:

1
2
3
4

and

6
7
8
9

, and we should delete every even row:

1
2 -- delete
3
4 -- delete

and

6
7 -- delete
8
9 -- delete

, so that we get:

1
3
6
8

Note that "even rows" means "even per-range ROW_NUMBER()s" here, not "even values of interval".

Here's the query:

DECLARE @Table TABLE (ID INT, UnitID INT, [Day] INT, Interval INT, Amount FLOAT)

INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (1, 100, 10, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (2, 100, 10, 22, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (3, 200, 11, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (4, 300, 11, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (5, 300, 11, 22, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (6, 300, 11, 23, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (7, 400, 13, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (8, 400, 13, 22, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (9, 400, 13, 23, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (10, 400, 13, 24, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (11, 400, 13, 26, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (12, 400, 13, 27, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (13, 400, 13, 28, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (14, 400, 13, 29, 9.345)

;WITH   rows AS
        (
        SELECT  *,
                ROW_NUMBER() OVER
                (
                PARTITION BY
                        (
                        SELECT  TOP 1 qi.id AS mint
                        FROM    @Table qi
                        WHERE   qi.unitid = qo.unitid
                                AND qi.[day] = qo.[day]
                                AND qi.interval <= qo.interval
                                AND NOT EXISTS
                                (
                                SELECT  NULL
                                FROM    @Table t
                                WHERE   t.unitid = qi.unitid
                                        AND t.[day] = qi.day
                                        AND t.interval = qi.interval - 1
                                )
                        ORDER BY
                                qi.interval DESC
                        )
                ORDER BY interval
                ) AS rnm
        FROM    @Table qo
        )
DELETE
FROM    rows
WHERE   rnm % 2 = 0

SELECT  *
FROM    @table

Update:

Here's a more efficient query:

DECLARE @Table TABLE (ID INT, UnitID INT, [Day] INT, Interval INT, Amount FLOAT)

INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (1, 100, 10, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (2, 100, 10, 22, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (3, 200, 11, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (4, 300, 11, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (5, 300, 11, 22, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (6, 300, 11, 23, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (7, 400, 13, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (8, 400, 13, 22, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (9, 400, 13, 23, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (10, 400, 13, 24, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (11, 400, 13, 26, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (12, 400, 13, 27, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (13, 400, 13, 28, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (14, 400, 13, 29, 9.345)

;WITH    source AS
        (
        SELECT  *, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY unitid, day ORDER BY interval) rn
        FROM    @Table
        ),
        rows AS
        (
        SELECT  *, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY unitid, day, interval - rn ORDER BY interval) AS rnm
        FROM    source
        )
DELETE
FROM    rows
WHERE   rnm % 2 = 0

SELECT  *
FROM    @table
3
  • If your contiguous range of intervals is 2, 3, 4, 5 -- you need to delete odds and not evens.
    – Matt
    Aug 3, 2009 at 16:15
  • @Matt: Need to delete even rows, not even values. Interval 3 will have an even ROW_NUMBER() of 2 in your example.
    – Quassnoi
    Aug 3, 2009 at 16:18
  • I get it now. Looks like WITH/ROW_NUMBER is the way to go for this one
    – Matt
    Aug 3, 2009 at 16:40
1

I don't think what you're asking for is possible — but you may be able to get close. It appears you can almost do it by finding records with a self-join like this:

SELECT t1.id
FROM
  table t1 JOIN table t2 ON (
    t1.unitid = t2.unitid AND
    t1.day = t2.day AND
    t1.interval = t2.interval - 1
  )

but the problem is, that'll find id=6 as well. However, if you create a temporary table from this data, it may be much smaller than your original data, and thus far faster to scan with a cursor (to fix the id=6 problem). You can then do a DELETE FROM table WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM tmp_table) to kill the rows.

There may be a way to fix the ID=6 problem w/o a cursor, but if so, I don't see it.

1
  • 1
    If you've already put the original select into a table variable, then you could use a WHILE instead of a cursor to fix the id=6 problem. Aug 3, 2009 at 15:21
0

There is the WHILE statement, which is an alternative to the cursor. That combined with table variables might let you do the same thing within a performance bound you're OK with.

0
DECLARE @Table TABLE (ID INT, UnitID INT, [Day] INT, Interval INT, Amount FLOAT)

INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (1, 100, 10, 21, 9.345)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (2, 100, 10, 22, 9.367)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (3, 200, 11, 21, 4.150)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (4, 300, 11, 21, 4.350)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (5, 300, 11, 22, 4.734)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (6, 300, 11, 23, 5.106)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (7, 400, 13, 21, 10.257)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (8, 400, 13, 22, 10.428)

DELETE FROM @Table
WHERE ID IN (
  SELECT t1.ID
  FROM @Table t1
       INNER JOIN @Table t2 
            ON  t2.UnitID = t1.UnitID 
                AND t2.Day = t1.Day 
                AND t2.Interval = t1.Interval - 1
       LEFT OUTER JOIN @Table t3 
            ON  t3.UnitID = t2.UnitID 
                AND t3.Day = t2.Day 
                AND t3.Interval = t2.Interval - 1
  WHERE t3.ID IS NULL)

SELECT * FROM @Table
1
  • This will delete only the first adjacent value. If we have 21, 22, 23 and 24, this will delete 22 but leave 24.
    – Quassnoi
    Aug 3, 2009 at 15:43
0

Lieven is so close - it worked for the test set, but if I add a few more records it starts to miss some.

We cannot use any odd/even criteria - we have no idea how the data falls.

Add this data and retry:

INSERT @Table VALUES (9,    100,     10,   23,        9.345)

INSERT @Table VALUES (10,   100,     10,   24,        9.367)

INSERT @Table VALUES (11,   100,     10,   25,        4.150)

INSERT @Table VALUES (12,   100,     10,   26,        4.350)

INSERT @Table VALUES (13,   300,     11,   25,        4.734)

INSERT @Table VALUES (14,   300,     11,   26,        5.106)

INSERT @Table VALUES (15,   300,     11,   27,       10.257)

INSERT @Table VALUES (16,   300,     11,   29,       10.428)
1
  • @Ian: retried, it leaves rows 9, 11, 13, 15 and 16, deletes 10, 12 and 14. Isn't it what you want?
    – Quassnoi
    Aug 3, 2009 at 16:24

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