How do I find the location of my site-packages directory?

  • 23
    If you just want the exact location of one package then you can use pip show <package name> – joshuakcockrell Jul 25 '17 at 5:18

16 Answers 16

up vote 174 down vote accepted

There are two types of site-packages directories, global and per user.

  1. Global site-packages ("dist-packages") directories are listed in sys.path when you run:

    python -m site
    

    For a more concise list run getsitepackages from the site module in Python code:

    python -c "import site; print(site.getsitepackages())"
    

    Note: With virtualenvs getsitepackages is not available, sys.path from above will list the virtualenv's site-packages directory correctly, though.

  2. The per user site-packages directory (PEP 370) is where Python installs your local packages:

    python -m site --user-site
    

    If this points to a non-existing directory check the exit status of Python and see python -m site --help for explanations.

    Hint: Running pip list --user or pip freeze --user gives you a list of all installed per user site-packages.

>>> import site; site.getsitepackages()
['/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages', '/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages']

(or just first item with site.getsitepackages()[0])

  • 17
    This is good but, unfortunately, this function is available only from python2.7. So, nice solution if you are using python2.7 or above, but not working for python 2.6 and below – Dan Niero Jan 20 '13 at 19:58
  • 13
    python -c "import site; print(site.getsitepackages())" – Lars Schneider Dec 10 '13 at 14:00
  • 28
    I get AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'getsitepackages' when using with virtualenv (python 2.7.8), the distutils solution below works though. – radtek Aug 5 '14 at 14:58
  • 7
    @radtek: for venv's, I detect venv via hasattr(sys,'real_prefix') and then determine site packages heuristically from [p for p in sys.path if p.endswith('site-packages')][-1] (plus check if there is one found before doing the [-1]. – eudoxos Aug 15 '14 at 6:10
  • 3
    @radtek It is a known bug that the site module does not work for virtualenv github.com/pypa/virtualenv/issues/355 – gcucurull Jul 6 '16 at 13:18

From "How to Install Django" documentation (though this is useful to more than just Django installation) - execute the following from the shell:

python -c "from distutils.sysconfig import get_python_lib; print(get_python_lib())"

Formatted for readability (rather than use as a one-liner), that looks like the following:

from distutils.sysconfig import get_python_lib
print(get_python_lib())
  • 1
    Does virtualenv provide a way to find its site-packages? – Daryl Spitzer Nov 13 '11 at 14:57
  • 8
    You can use virtualenvwrapper, which has the command cdsitepackages, to directly change into the environment's site-packages directory. – john2x Feb 10 '12 at 10:06
  • 6
    @PiotrDobrogost: works for me on Python 2.7 in a virtualenv on Linux – RichVel Mar 6 '13 at 9:57
  • 2
    First comment does not apply anymore: this showed the correct location both outside and inside a virtualenv. – astrojuanlu Apr 15 '16 at 10:21
  • 1
    Did not work for me on Windows 10 using Linux bash, it returns /usr/lib/python3/dist-packages instead of /usr/lib/python3.5/dist-packages. – Delgan Sep 15 '17 at 8:57

For Ubuntu,

python -c "from distutils.sysconfig import get_python_lib; print get_python_lib()"

...is not correct.

It will point you to /usr/lib/pythonX.X/dist-packages

This folder only contains packages your operating system has automatically installed for programs to run.

On ubuntu, the site-packages folder that contains packages installed via setup_tools\easy_install\pip will be in /usr/local/lib/pythonX.X/dist-packages

The second folder is probably the more useful one if the use case is related to installation or reading source code.

If you do not use Ubuntu, you are probably safe copy-pasting the first code box into the terminal.

  • 3
    If the asker is after a particular package's location, module.__file__ is the better way. If they're trying to install things… just use the tools. – Tobu Nov 30 '12 at 15:37
  • '/usr/lib/pythonX.X/dist-packages' in site.getsitepackages() on Ubuntu (though it goes after /usr/local/... in the list). You only get something into /usr/local via sudo pip and you shouldn't use sudo pip on Ubuntu unless you decided to make your own distribution: if you use sudo pip, it is your responsibility to make sure that all dependencies of the current and future python modules installed via sudo apt or sudo pip are compatible. Consider what problem virtualenv was created to solve – jfs Sep 13 '17 at 14:54
  • Clear explanation to understand the differences of the 2 dist-packages in (L)Ubuntu. – Timo Nov 28 '17 at 12:39

This is what worked for me:

python -m site --user-site
  • 11
    For me this points to a folder that doesn't even exist (~/.local/lib/python2.7/site-packages). – Neil Traft Jul 11 '14 at 18:45
  • 1
    same, in OS X Mavericks , my home .local isn't what I wanted it to find plus yeah its not really there anyways. – radtek Aug 11 '14 at 19:54
  • Its in my main /Library folder I had to manually navigate to it, for some reason the direct full path wasn't working – efwjames Sep 18 '15 at 15:39
  • how do i use the packages installed here? if i do virtualenv it complains that the package does not exist. how do i invoke the packages installed at a custom location? – AbtPst Apr 25 '16 at 21:45
  • 2
    This tells you where Python will look for user specific packages. Comments like "doesn't even exist" and "isn't what I wanted it to find" don't make sense in this context. – Honest Abe Mar 31 '17 at 19:10

As others have noted, distutils.sysconfig has the relevant settings:

import distutils.sysconfig
print distutils.sysconfig.get_python_lib()

...though the default site.py does something a bit more crude, paraphrased below:

import sys, os
print os.sep.join([sys.prefix, 'lib', 'python' + sys.version[:3], 'site-packages'])

(it also adds ${sys.prefix}/lib/site-python and adds both paths for sys.exec_prefix as well, should that constant be different).

That said, what's the context? You shouldn't be messing with your site-packages directly; setuptools/distutils will work for installation, and your program may be running in a virtualenv where your pythonpath is completely user-local, so it shouldn't assume use of the system site-packages directly either.

  • works reliable with python2 on osx and ubuntu with and without virtualenv but not with python3 at all. – jitter May 18 '16 at 18:34
  • 2
    2008 was a while back -- this answer was three months before Python 3.0's release. – Charles Duffy May 18 '16 at 18:37
  • sure, but today my comment might help. correct me if am wrong. furthermore, i did not downvote this answer or any other in regards to python3. – jitter May 18 '16 at 18:40

Let's say you have installed the package 'django'. import it and type in dir(django). It will show you, all the functions and attributes with that module. Type in the python interpreter -

>>> import django
>>> dir(django)
['VERSION', '__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__', '__path__', 'get_version']
>>> print django.__path__
['/Library/Python/2.6/site-packages/django']

You can do the same thing if you have installed mercurial.

This is for Snow Leopard. But I think it should work in general as well.

  • >>> import pg >>> print pg.__path__ Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'path' – Dannid Mar 4 '13 at 22:09
  • it works, i need to find the sklearn package to add to the PYDEV path, thanks. – berkay Jan 2 '15 at 21:20

All the answers (or: the same answer repeated over and over) are inadequate. What you want to do is this:

from setuptools.command.easy_install import easy_install
class easy_install_default(easy_install):
  """ class easy_install had problems with the fist parameter not being
      an instance of Distribution, even though it was. This is due to
      some import-related mess.
      """

  def __init__(self):
    from distutils.dist import Distribution
    dist = Distribution()
    self.distribution = dist
    self.initialize_options()
    self._dry_run = None
    self.verbose = dist.verbose
    self.force = None
    self.help = 0
    self.finalized = 0

e = easy_install_default()
import distutils.errors
try:
  e.finalize_options()
except distutils.errors.DistutilsError:
  pass

print e.install_dir

The final line shows you the installation dir. Works on Ubuntu, whereas the above ones don't. Don't ask me about windows or other dists, but since it's the exact same dir that easy_install uses by default, it's probably correct everywhere where easy_install works (so, everywhere, even macs). Have fun. Note: original code has many swearwords in it.

  • 1
    Thanks, this is pretty useful, on py3 with brackets for print it gets me /usr/local/lib/python3.4/dist-packages I'm trying to work out how to get /usr/lib/python3.4/dist-packages so will have to play further. – Stuart Axon Dec 2 '15 at 5:29
  • 2
    requires external library easy_install and does not fail gracefully if unavailable which is inadequate :) – jitter May 18 '16 at 18:36
  • indeed, this is not perfect, but it worked for me and took a lot of time to figure out, so I put it here in hopes someone else can build upon the time I've spent on it already. – cheater May 25 '16 at 15:05

The native system packages installed with python installation in Debian based systems can be found at :

/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/

In OSX - /Library/Python/2.7/site-packages

by using this small code :

from distutils.sysconfig import get_python_lib
print get_python_lib()

However, the list of packages installed via pip can be found at :

/usr/local/bin/

Or one can simply write the following command to list all paths where python packages are.

>>> import site; site.getsitepackages()
['/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages', '/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages']

Note: the location might vary based on your OS, like in OSX

>>> import site; site.getsitepackages()
['/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/site-packages', '/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/site-python', '/Library/Python/2.7/site-packages']
  • If I remember correctly, dist-packages is specific to Debian and derivates. – Samuel Santana Jul 21 '17 at 21:11
  • @SamuelSantana you are correct. dist-packages are specific to debian based systems. In this case I invoked site.getsitepackages() from the system installation hence the dist-packages, other installations will show site-packages. – fnatic_shank Mar 23 at 5:31

A side-note: The proposed solution (distutils.sysconfig.get_python_lib()) does not work when there is more than one site-packages directory (as recommended by this article). It will only return the main site-packages directory. Alas, I have no better solution either. Python doesn't seem to keep track of site-packages directories, just the packages within them.

  • 1
    I guess that's the reason why get_python_lib() when being run from within virtualenv shows site-packages of Python used to create virtualenv and not the virtualenv's site-packages. – Piotr Dobrogost Nov 12 '11 at 19:04
  • 3
    @Piotr That was probably a bug in distutils.sysconfig. I've just tested it an I get the inner site-packages, as expected. – Tobu Nov 30 '12 at 12:37
  • Also tested with Python 2.7 installed in a virtualenv on Linux, and the distutils.sysconfig method works fine to get the inner Python's site-packages. – RichVel Mar 6 '13 at 9:56

This works for me. It will get you both dist-packages and site-packages folders. If the folder is not on Python's path, it won't be doing you much good anyway.

import sys; 
print [f for f in sys.path if f.endswith('packages')]

Output (Ubuntu installation):

['/home/username/.local/lib/python2.7/site-packages',
 '/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages',
 '/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages']
  • 1
    accepted answer is the recommended way, so you should tell why yours is better, since it's a bit of a hack – CharlesB Mar 30 '12 at 16:37
  • What's wrong with a hack? ;) It's simpler and easy to understand and remember if you're working interactively. – just_an_old_guy Mar 31 '12 at 0:05
  • for python2 this is a working answer. – jitter May 18 '16 at 18:38
  • Best answer so far – e-satis Mar 1 '17 at 12:08
from distutils.sysconfig import get_python_lib
print get_python_lib()

An additional note to the get_python_lib function mentioned already: on some platforms different directories are used for platform specific modules (eg: modules that require compilation). If you pass plat_specific=True to the function you get the site packages for platform specific packages.

This should work on all distributions in and out of virtual environment due to it's "low-tech" nature. The os module always resides in the parent directory of 'site-packages'

import os; print(os.path.dirname(os.__file__) + '/site-packages')

To change dir to the site-packages dir I use the following alias (on *nix systems):

alias cdsp='cd $(python -c "import os; print(os.path.dirname(os.__file__))"); cd site-packages'

Answer to old question. But use ipython for this.

pip install ipython
ipython 
import imaplib
imaplib?

This will give the following output about imaplib package -

Type:        module
String form: <module 'imaplib' from '/usr/lib/python2.7/imaplib.py'>
File:        /usr/lib/python2.7/imaplib.py
Docstring:  
IMAP4 client.

Based on RFC 2060.

Public class:           IMAP4
Public variable:        Debug
Public functions:       Internaldate2tuple
                        Int2AP
                        ParseFlags
                        Time2Internaldate
  • This isn't the site-packages directory, but the directory that the package is installed into. This is also only helpful if you're using iPython and not for being able to programmatically get an install directory. – danielunderwood Dec 10 '16 at 23:14

I had to do something slightly different for a project I was working on: find the relative site-packages directory relative to the base install prefix. If the site-packages folder was in /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages, I wanted the /lib/python2.7/site-packages part. I have, in fact, encountered systems where site-packages was in /usr/lib64, and the accepted answer did NOT work on those systems.

Similar to cheater's answer, my solution peeks deep into the guts of Distutils, to find the path that actually gets passed around inside setup.py. It was such a pain to figure out that I don't want anyone to ever have to figure this out again.

import sys
import os
from distutils.command.install import INSTALL_SCHEMES

if os.name == 'nt':
    scheme_key = 'nt'
else:
    scheme_key = 'unix_prefix'

print(INSTALL_SCHEMES[scheme_key]['purelib'].replace('$py_version_short', (str.split(sys.version))[0][0:3]).replace('$base', ''))

That should print something like /Lib/site-packages or /lib/python3.6/site-packages.

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