127

If I have:

void MyMethod(Object obj) {   ...   }

How can I cast obj to what its actual type is?

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  • 2
    Is the type known at compile time? – psubsee2003 Sep 2 '12 at 7:19
  • 2
    And what do you expect to accomplish from this? Please tell us what you're trying to achieve, rather than how you expect to achieve it. – Jon Skeet Sep 2 '12 at 7:20
  • @JonSkeet: I want to be able to call a function from the object. Currently obj.MyFunction(); does not compile, even though I know that the real object does have that function. – Paul Lassiter Sep 2 '12 at 7:23
  • @psubsee2003: no it doesn't, because it is an object reference being passed by via interop. – Paul Lassiter Sep 2 '12 at 7:24
  • 3
    @PaulLassiter: If you don't know the type, what declares the MyFunction method? – Jon Skeet Sep 2 '12 at 7:25

10 Answers 10

204

If you know the actual type, then just:

SomeType typed = (SomeType)obj;
typed.MyFunction();

If you don't know the actual type, then: not really, no. You would have to instead use one of:

  • reflection
  • implementing a well-known interface
  • dynamic

For example:

// reflection
obj.GetType().GetMethod("MyFunction").Invoke(obj, null);

// interface
IFoo foo = (IFoo)obj; // where SomeType : IFoo and IFoo declares MyFunction
foo.MyFunction();

// dynamic
dynamic d = obj;
d.MyFunction();
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  • 1
    What's the equivalent syntax in Swift? – Nagendra Rao Apr 22 '17 at 19:48
  • 1
    Nevermind, found as for typecasting and type(of: ClassName) function to check instance type. – Nagendra Rao Apr 22 '17 at 20:34
42

I don't think you can (not without reflection), you should provide a type to your function as well:

void MyMethod(Object obj, Type t)
{
    var convertedObject = Convert.ChangeType(obj, t);
    ...
}

UPD:

This may work for you:

void MyMethod(Object obj)
{
    if (obj is A)
    {
        A a = obj as A;
        ...
    } 
    else if (obj is B)
    {
        B b = obj as B;
        ...
    }
}
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  • 5
    This really is a useless answer, undeserving of up-votes. Reflection of an object of type object will not yield the "actual type" of the object, as asked by OP. Also, your MyMethod logic is flawed because obj can be of type A and it also can be of type B. Your logic doesn't provide the "actual type" (as OP requested)--it provides a compatible type, and not necessarily the desired type at that. – Jazimov Feb 3 '18 at 1:40
  • use obj.GetType(). That will definitely return it's actual type. – JSON Mar 21 '18 at 15:04
  • We already know the 'Type'. He wants it to resolve like if it was a 'T' – Latency Sep 1 at 0:52
3

How about JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(object.ToString());

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  • This is not a satisfying answer. OP's question has nothing to do with Json or serialization. – user12637955 May 26 at 10:47
  • @user12637955 this is actually a working answer, but has bigger complexity, due to boxing and unboxing, i.e. object -> ToString() -> to concrete type. To be more accurate it should look like this: var myType = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<MyType>(object.ToString()); – Coke Jun 30 at 17:58
2

This method might not be the most efficient but is simple and does the job.

It performs two operations: firstly it calls .ToString() which is basiclly a serialization, and then the deserialization using Newtonsoft nuget (which you must install).

public T Format<T>(Object obj) =>
    JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(obj.ToString());
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  • You should describe your answer briefly for the future readers. – Suraj Kumar Feb 21 at 11:30
1

In my case AutoMapper works well.

AutoMapper can map to/from dynamic objects without any explicit configuration:

public class Foo {
    public int Bar { get; set; }
    public int Baz { get; set; }
}
dynamic foo = new MyDynamicObject();
foo.Bar = 5;
foo.Baz = 6;

Mapper.Initialize(cfg => {});

var result = Mapper.Map<Foo>(foo);
result.Bar.ShouldEqual(5);
result.Baz.ShouldEqual(6);

dynamic foo2 = Mapper.Map<MyDynamicObject>(result);
foo2.Bar.ShouldEqual(5);
foo2.Baz.ShouldEqual(6);

Similarly you can map straight from dictionaries to objects, AutoMapper will line up the keys with property names.

more info https://github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper/wiki/Dynamic-and-ExpandoObject-Mapping

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0

If your MyFunction() method is defined only in one class (and its descendants), try

void MyMethod(Object obj) 
{
    var o = obj as MyClass;
    if (o != null)
        o.MyFunction();
}

If you have a large number in unrelated classes defining the function you want to call, you should define an interface and make your classes define that interface:

interface IMyInterface
{
    void MyFunction();
}

void MyMethod(Object obj) 
{
    var o = obj as IMyInterface;
    if (o != null)
        o.MyFunction();
}
| |
0

Cast it to its real type if you now the type for example it is oriented from class named abc. You can call your function in this way :

(abc)(obj)).MyFunction();

if you don't know the function it can be done in a different way. Not easy always. But you can find it in some way by it's signature. If this is your case, you should let us know.

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0

If multiple types are possible, the method itself does not know the type to cast, but the caller does, you might use something like this:

void TheObliviousHelperMethod<T>(object obj) {
    (T)obj.ThatClassMethodYouWantedToInvoke();
}

// Meanwhile, where the method is called:
TheObliviousHelperMethod<ActualType>(obj);

Restrictions on the type could be added using the where keyword after the parentheses.

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-2
Implement an interface to call your function in your method
interface IMyInterface
{
 void MyinterfaceMethod();
}

IMyInterface MyObj = obj as IMyInterface;
if ( MyObj != null)
{
MyMethod(IMyInterface MyObj );
}
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-3

Casting to actual type is easy:

void MyMethod(Object obj) {
    ActualType actualyType = (ActualType)obj;
}
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  • 8
    This is illogical. You actually don't know the actual type. How are you supposed to do that? – Allen Linatoc Aug 25 '15 at 14:11

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