I've noticed that Java String will reuse char array inside it to avoid creating new char array for a new String instance in method such as subString(). There are several unpublish constructors in String for this purpose, accepting a char array and two int as range to construct a String instance.

But until today I found that split will also reuse the char arr of original String instance. Now I read a loooooong line from a file, split it with "," and cut a very limit column for real usage. Because every part of the line secretly holding the reference of the looooong char array, I got an OOO very soon.

here is example code:

ArrayList<String> test = new ArrayList<String>(3000000);
BufferedReader origReader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File(
        "G:\\filewithlongline.txt")));
String line = origReader.readLine();
int i = 0;
while ((line = origReader.readLine()) != null) {
    String name = line.split(',')[0];
    test.add(name);
    i++;
    if (i % 100000 == 0) {
        System.out.println(name);
    }
}
System.out.println(test.size());

Is there any standard method in JDK to make sure that every String instance that spitted is a "real deep copy" not "shallow copy"?

Now I am using a very ugly workaround to force creating a new String instance:

ArrayList<String> test = new ArrayList<String>(3000000);
BufferedReader origReader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File(
        "G:\\filewithlongline.txt")));
String line = origReader.readLine();
int i = 0;
while ((line = origReader.readLine()) != null) {
    String name = line.split(',')[0]+"  ".trim(); // force creating a String instance
    test.add(name);
    i++;
    if (i % 100000 == 0) {
        System.out.println(name);
    }
}
System.out.println(test.size());
  • +1 for a loooooong line – perilbrain Sep 2 '12 at 17:46
  • I really really wonder what OOO is – Serkan Arıkuşu Sep 2 '12 at 17:49
  • @SerkanArıkuşu OOO here means Out Of Memory. – DeepNightTwo Sep 3 '12 at 2:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simplest approach is to create a new String directly. This is one of the rare cases where its a good idea.

String name = new String(line.split(",")[0]); // note the use of ","

An alternative is to parse the file yourself.

do {
    StringBuilder name = new StringBuilder();
    int ch;
    while((ch = origReader.read()) >= 0 && ch != ',' && ch >= ' ') {
       name.append((char) ch);
    }
    test.add(name.toString());
} while(origReader.readLine() != null);
  • Finally I found the reason why String has a constructor which accept another String instance as paramter :-). So, it is needed to iterator the String array from split() and call new String() for columns needed. Is there a "deepSplit()"? – DeepNightTwo Sep 2 '12 at 17:51
  • I'm perplexed by that loop you're using... once origReader.read returns -1 and the inner loop exits, then surely origReader.readLine will then have to return null. – oldrinb Sep 2 '12 at 18:32
  • @DeepNightTwo No there isn't – Peter Lawrey Sep 2 '12 at 20:34
  • @veer If the inner loop stops in the outer loop will as well. This would only occur if the last line doesn't have a , or a new line. – Peter Lawrey Sep 2 '12 at 20:36
  • 1
    @PeterLawrey new String() sounds like a good way to go. It is more simple than parse it myself. Thanks! – DeepNightTwo Sep 3 '12 at 2:47

String has a copy constructor you can use for this purpose.

final String name = new String(line.substring(0, line.indexOf(',')));

... or, as Peter suggested, just only read until the ,.

final StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder();
do {
  int ch;
  while ((ch = origReader.read()) >= 0 && ch != ',') {
    buf.append((char) ch);
  }
  test.add(buf.toString());
  buf.setLength(0);
} while (origReader.readLine() != null);

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