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Suppose I have this folder structure:

/projectroot/foo/bar/subfoo/foo.txt

Now I change something in foo.txt a make a commit.

I have another repository with the exact same foo.txt but the folder structure is like this:

/projectroot/somedir/foo.txt

It's obvious that there should be a way to automatically apply the work on foo.txt in the second repository. I guess one can create a patch but I fail to find the right way to do it. I somehow need to create a patch out of the commit that works only on the file (or relative to the parent directory) and then apply it only to the file or to the directory that hosts the file.

How can I do this with git?

  • Shouldn't you be able to get the diff between current foo.txt and previous foo.txt from git and apply it with patch? I've never used git, but in SVN it's trivial to get a diff file for: "what has changed in file x between revisions r and n". Maybe this post is telling you how to do the same thing with git: stackoverflow.com/questions/3368590/show-diff-between-commits – jahroy Sep 2 '12 at 19:08
  • Have a look at the -p parameter (strip prefix) of patch or git apply – knittl Sep 2 '12 at 19:21
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The usual thing to do is to create the patch as usual and then to use the options

--directory (and maybe also -p) when applying the patch with git apply or git am.

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