13

I came across this in answering another question. I was trying to diagnose which code change had a greater effect on the speed. I used a boolean flag in a for loop to switch between using helper methods to construct a Color.

The interesting behavior is that when I decided which one was faster and removed the if the speed of the code amplified 10x. Taking 140ms before and just 13ms afterward. I should only be removing one calculation out of about 7 from the loop. Why such a drastic increase in speed?

Slow code: (runs in 141 milliseconds when helperMethods is false) *See edit 2

public static void applyAlphaGetPixels(Bitmap b, Bitmap bAlpha, boolean helperMethods) {
    int w = b.getWidth();
    int h = b.getHeight();
    int[] colorPixels = new int[w*h];
    int[] alphaPixels = new int[w*h];
    b.getPixels(colorPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
    bAlpha.getPixels(alphaPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
    for(int j = 0; j < colorPixels.length;j++){
        if(helperMethods){
            colorPixels[j] = Color.argb(Color.alpha(alphaPixels[j]), Color.red(colorPixels[j]), Color.green(colorPixels[j]), Color.blue(colorPixels[j]));
        } else colorPixels[j] = alphaPixels[j] | (0x00FFFFFF & colorPixels[j]);
    }
    b.setPixels(colorPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
}

Fast Code: (Runs in 13ms)

public static void applyAlphaGetPixels(Bitmap b, Bitmap bAlpha) {
    int w = b.getWidth();
    int h = b.getHeight();
    int[] colorPixels = new int[w*h];
    int[] alphaPixels = new int[w*h];
    b.getPixels(colorPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
    bAlpha.getPixels(alphaPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
    for(int j = 0; j < colorPixels.length;j++){
        colorPixels[j] = alphaPixels[j] | (0x00FFFFFF & colorPixels[j]);
    }
    b.setPixels(colorPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
}

EDIT: It seems the issue is not with the fact that the if is inside the loop. If I elevate the if outside of the loop. The code runs slightly faster but still at the slow speeds with 131ms:

public static void applyAlphaGetPixels(Bitmap b, Bitmap bAlpha, boolean helperMethods) {
    int w = b.getWidth();
    int h = b.getHeight();
    int[] colorPixels = new int[w*h];
    int[] alphaPixels = new int[w*h];
    b.getPixels(colorPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
    bAlpha.getPixels(alphaPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
    if (helperMethods) {
        for (int j = 0; j < colorPixels.length;j++) {
            colorPixels[j] = Color.argb(Color.alpha(alphaPixels[j]),
                                        Color.red(colorPixels[j]),
                                        Color.green(colorPixels[j]),
                                        Color.blue(colorPixels[j]));
        }
    } else {
        for (int j = 0; j < colorPixels.length;j++) {
             colorPixels[j] = alphaPixels[j] | (0x00FFFFFF & colorPixels[j]);
        }
    }

    b.setPixels(colorPixels, 0, w, 0, 0, w, h);
}

EDIT 2: I'm dumb. Really really dumb. Earlier in the call stack I used another boolean flag to switch between between using this method and using another method that uses getPixel instead of getPixels. I had this flag set wrong for all of my calls that have the helperMethod parameter. When I made new calls to the version without helperMethod I did it correct. The performance boost is because of getPixels not the if statement.

Actual Slow code:

public static void applyAlphaGetPixel(Bitmap b, Bitmap bAlpha, boolean helperMethods) {
    int w = b.getWidth();
    int h = b.getHeight();
    for(int y=0; y < h; ++y) {
        for(int x=0; x < w; ++x) {
            int pixel = b.getPixel(x,y);
            int finalPixel;
            if(helperMethods){
                finalPixel = Color.argb(Color.alpha(bAlpha.getPixel(x,y)), Color.red(pixel), Color.green(pixel), Color.blue(pixel));
            } else{
                finalPixel = bAlpha.getPixel(x,y) | (0x00FFFFFF & pixel);
            }
            b.setPixel(x,y,finalPixel);
        }
    }
}

Note:All speeds are an average of 100 runs.

  • 1
    The if-statement probably makes the code a lot harder to optimize. – Mysticial Sep 2 '12 at 23:11
  • 2
    Branching / Branch prediction ? stackoverflow.com/questions/11227809/… – auselen Sep 2 '12 at 23:12
  • 1
    Traceview will probably fool you since that will disable JIT. – auselen Sep 2 '12 at 23:19
  • 1
    please provide much more detailed information. In which case is what how fast? Just removed the if or the if and the body of it? – WarrenFaith Sep 2 '12 at 23:20
  • 1
    helperMethods is true/false for the entire loop. So it can't be branch prediction. – Mysticial Sep 2 '12 at 23:21
2

It is probably your profiling code, that confusing you. Try to isolate the part of the code that you want to profile and just measure that part, avoid GCable operations like creating Bitmaps in your cases.

If I call your test code with

testing.loadDrawable(this, false, true, false)

it runs slow. But if I call it with

testing.loadDrawable(this, true, true, false)

That's a similar (still worse) number. So useGetPixels makes all the difference. Which I guess gets the Bitmap data into a local buffer and set the results later.

  • If the problem was the GC wouldn't that mean only the first run would be fast since only the later ones would be bogged down by the GC clearing the earlier test? Also this is the biggest performance impact I've heard of as a result of the GC and it seems to have come out of nowhere. How can I predict when the GC will cause such massive problems? This feels like I'm getting close to the answer, but I'd still like to know exactly what's going on. – Fr33dan Sep 3 '12 at 14:23
  • 1
    In this answer I don't claim problem is due to GCs but your code is too messy and doesn't do the profiling correctly. I believe your problem is useGetPixels, when you enable it run time increases. Otherwise if as you clain doesn't change run time. – auselen Sep 3 '12 at 17:19
  • So I'm confused. You are saying getPixels had an increased run time? For me it was faster every time. You're the "fast" version is loadDrawableHard(this,true,true). I changed the name so I would be able to tell easily which was the hard coded one. In this version all the code is the same except the applyAlphaGetPixelsHard() and 'applyGetPixelHard()` are called instead. If I run it with useGetPixels set to false I don't see the same improvement. I originally wrote loadDrawableHard() to only use applyAlphaGetPixelsHard() but added applyGetPixelHard() to remove a possible differences. – Fr33dan Sep 3 '12 at 17:56
  • I cannot believe what I did. If you look at all my calls they all have useGetPixels set to false. Nothing wrong with my profiling code, I've just been profiling the wrong thing the whole stupid time. – Fr33dan Sep 3 '12 at 18:18
  • This was all I tried to say from the beginning however I guess you had to see it to understand. When I say your profiling code is confusing you, I wanted to say that code was too messy, making it for hard to see how you call those functions. GC thing was just a side notice. – auselen Sep 3 '12 at 18:33
4

Try hoisting the condition out of the loop:

if (helperMethods) {
    for (int j = 0; j < colorPixels.length;j++) {
        colorPixels[j] = Color.argb(Color.alpha(alphaPixels[j]),
                                    Color.red(colorPixels[j]),
                                    Color.green(colorPixels[j]),
                                    Color.blue(colorPixels[j]));
    }
} else {
    for (int j = 0; j < colorPixels.length;j++) {
         colorPixels[j] = alphaPixels[j] | (0x00FFFFFF & colorPixels[j]);
    }
}
  • This is very interesting. It seems to be acting the same. Runs with helperMethods false in 143ms. – Fr33dan Sep 2 '12 at 23:28
  • Branch prediction should handle it really well though... hmm. – oldrinb Sep 2 '12 at 23:29
2

In the 'fast code' you never run the statement

colorPixels[j] = Color.argb(Color.alpha(alphaPixels[j]), Color.red(colorPixels[j]), Color.green(colorPixels[j]), Color.blue(colorPixels[j])); 

But in the 'slow code' if the boolean is set to true at least once you run this addiotional statement that makes the time longer. If your condition is always false then the if statement is checked about 7 times in each iteration through the loop. Try to place the if outside the loop.

  • I've tried that, the code still runs at roughly the slow time. It's 8ms faster. – Fr33dan Sep 2 '12 at 23:40
  • it's interesting. Big-O analysis... :) – Marcin S. Sep 2 '12 at 23:43
  • 1
    I don't think it's technically Big-O since that's defined by the number of time an algorithm runs compared to the dataset. – Fr33dan Sep 2 '12 at 23:46
  • right. however it must be something that consumes that time probably somewhere in the lower level which sounds as bug for me – Marcin S. Sep 2 '12 at 23:51
0

In your fast code you don't use class Color at all. I assume initialization of this class takes some time, it has lots of static method and static code.

You can try to do following: make sure Color class is fully loaded and initialized before making your test (you can call any static method from Color class before calling your applyAlphaGetPixels() method). Then run your test and compare results.

  • Wouldn't this only effect the first time the test is run within an instance of the program? – Fr33dan Sep 3 '12 at 14:25
  • Most likely it should affect only first run in the production program, but it could affect differently in your test runs – HitOdessit Sep 3 '12 at 14:37

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