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Is there a type in the .NET Framework that will compare two operators and determine if one has lower precedence than another? For the time being, I've implemented a function in the form of IComparer<ExpressionType>, for the operators I am interested in, and by using the operator category chart for the C# language.

The implementation is trivial, and of general use for compiler/interpreter implementers, leading me to think that a general utility function exists. Alternatively, it would also be trivial to implement such a comparer if a library function exists to get the ordinal of a given operator.

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    Technically, the precedence would be a language feature not a runtime feature (although I imagine it'll be pretty similar in most languages). But no: I'm not aware of anything inbuilt for that. – Marc Gravell Sep 3 '12 at 15:38
  • @MarcGravell: I was thinking along the same lines too, but I thought that the runtime would enforce some precedence for the operators it provides. In retrospect, I don't think this makes sense since languages are free to put expressions on the stack in a manner that they choose. – Steve Guidi Sep 3 '12 at 15:44
  • indeed, you could write a language that is pure left-to-right (or just for giggles right-to-left); the runtime doesn't know the original code. – Marc Gravell Sep 3 '12 at 15:45
  • Just throwing it out here: maybe, just maybe, Roslyn will get you closer to what you're looking for. Might be some internal method at the CSharp compiler. (But maybe I'm just talking nonsense here :-P ) – M.A. Hanin Sep 4 '12 at 21:47
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No, there isn't, and you've mentioned why (emphasis mine):

I've implemented a function in the form of IComparer<ExpressionType>, for the operators I am interested in, and by using the operator category chart for the C# language.

Operator overloading precedence is a language-specific detail. The Base Class Libraries (BCL) and the CLR are language-agnostic, they support many languages, all of which can provide their own order for operator precedence.

And even if they offered a method to be used in any language to indicate what the operator overload precedence would be, what happens when you write code in language A (with precedence PA) and then consume it with language B (with precedence PB)?

You would get inconsistent results.

This is why it's determined on the language level, and not on the BCL/CLR level; there's just no possible way to do it consistently across languages, and it might not even make sense if they could or tried given that you can access the library from multiple languages.

If you are going to implement such a thing, I recommend that you include a language identifier and make sure that comparisons of operator precedence are tied to the language. That's the only way to guarantee consistent results when the method/library is used across all languages.

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