4

I have a page with a variable-height header, content area, and footer. I want the content area to always fill the viewport, and grow vertically to fit content as necessary. I've found lots of examples of doing this with fixed-height headers, but none where the height is unknown.

Any solution needs to work in IE 6, 7 and 8, Firefox 3.x and Safari 4. Can this be done with pure CSS? Do I have to give in and resort to table-based layout?

EDIT: An additional requirement is that I can place elements inside the content area and get them to expand to the full height of the content area (be it viewport height - header height - footer height or larger than that). Some of the content we want to display has "header" and "footer" sections of their own, so what I'm really looking for is a nestable solution.

4
  • Dupe? stackoverflow.com/questions/1211331/…
    – cletus
    Commented Aug 4, 2009 at 0:32
  • 8
    STOP SUPPORTING IE6
    – Jason
    Commented Aug 4, 2009 at 0:43
  • This would be tricky to accomplish without javascript. Is there reason you would like the content area to take up the entire viewport minus the header even when there is no content to stretch it? What exactly are you trying to accomplish?
    – kmiyashiro
    Commented Aug 4, 2009 at 2:54
  • @Jason: Unfortunately some of our major customers refuse to move off of IE6, so we're stuck supporting it. @kmiyashiro: The application is a pure ajax website, and the content area in question is where we display our dynamic pages. A lot of those pages do not have enough content to completely fill the viewport, and so the footer jumps up and down on the page as you navigate - very distracting. It simply looks more fluid and consistent if the footer stays at the bottom and the content area's style elements fill the visible space.
    – Annabelle
    Commented Aug 4, 2009 at 16:13

6 Answers 6

1

Ok so the min-height CSS property doesn't work :)

I played around with an actual HTML file now and I believe I found a way.

.header-footer
{
    height: 10%;
    background-color: lightYellow;
    display: table;
    width: 100%;
}

.container
{
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    height: 80%;
    width: 100%;
    display: table;
}

.inner
{   
    background-color: lightPink;
    height: 100%;
}

We use the display: table property to make sure each <div> sits nicely under and over the other ones.

NOTE: You have to set a height property for each of the elements on the page. It doesn't have to be as large as 10% that I chose, but at least something. Once the content is inserted into the element that is larger than the height value it should expand.

I've created two seperate HTML pages for you to examine to see if this suits you:

Hopefully this is what you're looking for.

Thanks

3
  • Given that IE6 and IE7 don't support display: table, I was amazed to see that this still worked in IE6 - there is a vertical scroll bar scrolling a few pixels, but I bet that's just default padding getting in the way. Is the display setting really necessary? I will have to play around with this some when I have more time.
    – Annabelle
    Commented Aug 5, 2009 at 21:58
  • The display: tables makes sure each div acts as if it was a table. If you don't have it then it doesn't force the div to expand as the content expands inside it. If you use Firebug (a Firefox add-on) then you can disable the display: table property on my test pages and see for yourself.
    – mlevit
    Commented Aug 5, 2009 at 23:02
  • 3
    @mlevit: the two reviewmysite examples are down. Care to create a jsfiddle? Commented Sep 3, 2012 at 5:33
0

if you want the header to change size, use a relative height. The content will already fill the viewport vertically.

1
  • The content panel will only fill the viewport if there is enough "content" inside it to stretch it that tall. I want its height to at minimum be the height of the viewport minus the height of the header, even if it is an empty element.
    – Annabelle
    Commented Aug 4, 2009 at 16:20
0

You can try using the min-height CSS property on the header, content and footer.

e.g.

.header-footer 
{
    min-height: 20%;
}

.content
{
    min-height: 80%;
}

Make sure that you set both <html> and <body> tags to have a min-height: 100% that way you can fill up the entire viewport.

This should allow for the page to expand as needed but stay at a minimum of 100%.

Thanks

2
  • 1
    The problem with min-height is it doesn't actually set the height of the element, so you can't add something to .content with a height of 100% and have it fill .content. What I really need is a solution that I can nest within itself. I've edited my question to that effect.
    – Annabelle
    Commented Aug 4, 2009 at 17:04
  • So this solution won't work? peterned.home.xs4all.nl/examples/csslayout1.html Commented Sep 3, 2012 at 5:34
0

I spent a day experimenting with this option and hit so many odd dead-ends that my professional advice is now this:

You designed it wrong.

Skip the variable height header entirely. It's a dumb idea anyway. I did. Worked great for me. Now I am the proud owner of a significantly simpler DOM cobweb and no hurdles that lead me to stackoverflow.

0

Please see this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/qH6K3/

<div id="a">
    <div id="b1">BOX1</div>
    <div id="b2">BOX2</div>
</div>

* {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
}

html,body{height:100%}

#b1 {
    background-color: red;
    height: 45px;
    width:100%;
}

#b2 {
    background: blue;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
}

#a { height: 100%; padding-bottom: 45px; }
0

Please try this for CSS: http://jsfiddle.net/K64Mm/6/ Variable height, content 100% height (supports even iframe 100% height), no superfluous scrollbars, scrollable on touch devices.

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="top topBar">

    </div> 
    <div class="content">
        <iframe scrolling="yes" src="http://www.zeffirino.com"></iframe>
    </div>
</div>

html, body { width: 100%; height: 100%; overflow: hidden; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }

.wrapper { width: 100%; height: 100%; padding-bottom: 45px; -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch !important; box-sizing: border-box; -moz-box-sizing: border-box; -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; }
.top { height: 45px; background-color: red; }
.content { height: 100%; width: 100%; overflow: auto !important; }
.content iframe { display: block; border: none; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

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