1

Code:

class B {
public:
    B () : b(++bCounter) {}
    int b;
    static int bCounter;
};

int B::bCounter = 0;

class D : public B {
public:
    D () : d(0) {}
    int d;
};

const int N = 10;
B arrB[N];
D arrD[N];



int sum1 (B* arr) {
    int s = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) 
    {
        s+=arr[i].b;
    }
    return s;
}
int sum2 (D* arr) {
    int s = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++)
    {
        s+=arr[i].b+arr[i].d;
    }
    return s;
}

Question:

What do these return:

1) sum1(arrB)=?

2) sum1(arrD)=?

3) sum2(arrD)=?

When I compile & run these, I get 55, 65, and 155, and have no idea why. I gather that in arrB the variables are b=1,2,3,...,10, and in arrD b=11,12,...,20, so I would've answered sum1(arrB)=55 and sum1(arrD)=155 as in sum of 11+12+..+20, and sum2(arrD)=155, because everywhere d=0.

What am I doing wrong?

3
  • 2
    Needs homework tag ? Try stepping through the code in your debugger ?
    – Paul R
    Sep 4 '12 at 8:40
  • It's not homework, I'm studying for an exam... And I tried debugging, but in the sum1(arrD) it's very strange, the for loop is skipping every 2nd value of indexes, but isn't skipping the values, I don't get it...
    – Vidak
    Sep 4 '12 at 8:44
  • Make sure you're using a build with no optimisation enabled when you debug, e.g. gcc -O0 ..., otherwise single-steping can be problematic in optimised code.
    – Paul R
    Sep 4 '12 at 8:51
4

You are getting object slicing. You are passing a D* array into a function that takes a B* array. D is initially bigger than B.

Each time you are doing s+=arr[i].b; you are moving the pointer by the size of B, while you need to move it by the size of D, so after each iteration the pointer is not moving one item forward.

[TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart]
^
|
iteration 0

[TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart]
         ^
         |
      iteration 1

[TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart]
                   ^
                   |
             iteration 2

[TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart][TheBPart|TheDPart]
                            ^
                            |
                          iteration 3

What happens in your particular case is that after each odd iteration it points to somewhere in the middle of the object of D class. This is only happening because D is exactly twice as big as B, otherwise the behavior would have been different.

0
2

The problem lies in converting arrD to arrB. B has the size of 4 bytes while D has a size of 8 bytes.

While you convert D* to B* you actually jump in the memory 4 bytes per iteration rather than 8 bytes. arrD will hold the following values in memory if we take 4 bytes at a time

11   // arrD[0].b
0    // arrD[0].d
12   // arrD[1].b
0    // arrD[1].d
13   // arrD[2].b
0    // arrD[2].d
14   // arrD[3].b
0    // arrD[3].d
15   // arrD[4].b
0    // arrD[4].d
16   // arrD[5].b
0    // arrD[5].d
17   // arrD[6].b
0    // arrD[6].d
18   // arrD[7].b
0    // arrD[7].d
19   // arrD[8].b
0    // arrD[8].d
20   // arrD[9].b
0    // arrD[9].d

Now as you sum up taking 4 bytes at a time, you take the first 10 values of this. Hence your result is: 11+0+12+0+13+0+14+0+15+0 = 65

From similar reasoning you can know reason for your result for sum2.

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