Since when we declare a function we get its prototype's constructor property point to the function itself, is it a bad practice to overwrite function's prototype like so:

function LolCat() {
}

// at this point LolCat.prototype.constructor === LolCat

LolCat.prototype = {
    hello: function () {
        alert('meow!');
    }
    // other method declarations go here as well
};

// But now LolCat.prototype.constructor no longer points to LolCat function itself

var cat = new LolCat();

cat.hello(); // alerts 'meow!', as expected

cat instanceof LolCat // returns true, as expected

This is not how I do it, I still prefer the following approach

LolCat.prototype.hello = function () { ... }

but I often see other people doing this.

So are there any implications or drawbacks by removing the constructor reference from the prototype by overwriting the function's prototype object for the sake of convenience as in the first example?

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I can't see anyone mentioning best practice as far as this is concerned, so I think it comes down to whether you can see the constructor property ever being useful.

One thing worth noting is that the constructor property, if you don't destroy it, will be available on the created object too. It seems to me like that could be useful:

var ClassOne = function() {alert("created one");}
var ClassTwo = function() {alert("created two");}

ClassOne.prototype.aProperty = "hello world"; // preserve constructor
ClassTwo.prototype = {aProperty: "hello world"}; // destroy constructor

var objectOne = new ClassOne(); // alerts "created one"
var objectTwo = new ClassTwo(); // alerts "created two"

objectOne.constructor(); // alerts "created one" again
objectTwo.constructor(); // creates and returns an empty object instance

So it seems to me that it's an architectural decision. Do you want to allow a created object to re-call its constructor after it's instantiated? If so preserve it. If not, destroy it.

Note that the constructor of objectTwo is now exactly equal to the standard Object constructor function - useless.

objectTwo.constructor === Object; // true

So calling new objectTwo.constructor() is equivalent to new Object().

It's not bad practice but you have to know what you are doing and why. It is very useful for prototypal inheritance. The object of which you overwrite the prototype will get all the properties of the object you assign to it's prototype:

You cause an object to inherit using

ChildClassName.prototype = new ParentClass();.

Now ChildClassName has all functionality of ParentClass but loses any functionality that was assigned to it's prototype before. You need to remember to reset the constructor property for the object using

ChildClassName.prototype.constructor=ChildClassName. 

Otherwise the object will be reported to be (when testing for the type of an object) of the ParentClass type instead of the ChildClassName type.

And now you can add more methods to the ChildClassName object in the way you described yourself.

ChildClassName.prototype.myMethod = function(){
    //do stuff
}

The result being a parent object/'class'(there are no real classes in javascript of course) and a child object/'class' that inherits from it and extends its functionality.

You just have to know that if you overwrite the prototype, any properties that where assigned to it will be gone. When constructing inheriting objects this might be exactly what you want.

  • When you say "reported to be of the ParentClass type", do you mean when tested with instanceof it will return false against the child class? – chrisf Sep 4 '12 at 9:37
  • Indeed. I'll clarify in the answer, thanks – Asciiom Sep 4 '12 at 9:38

This form:

LolCat.prototype = {
  hello: function () {
      alert('meow!');
  }
};

Destroys any existing methods and public properties. In the example, as given, it doesn't matter as the newly created LolCat doesn't have any properties or methods. However, one should be mindful of this in more complicated code.

This form:

LolCat.prototype.hello = function () { ... }

Adds a new method to an existing object and keeps the existing intact.

  • True, but the in the context of a newly defined class like the OP's example, that's not really a problem as nothing public "exists" yet. – chrisf Sep 4 '12 at 9:29
  • 1
    Oh, I agree that in the example, as given, that is true. I modified my answer to clarify. Thank you. – Jeremy J Starcher Sep 4 '12 at 9:32

Its not a bad practice to overwrite the constructor when using prototypal inheritance. Infact many people do it like so:

LolCat.prototype = {
    constructor: LolCat,
    hello: function () {
        alert('meow!');
    }
};
  • Would you say it's totally optional then? I mean, if it doesn't break the instanceof operator then there's not really a down-side to leaving it out completely? – chrisf Sep 4 '12 at 9:30
  • 1
    @Chris: stackoverflow.com/questions/4012998/… – Felix Kling Sep 4 '12 at 9:53
  • @FelixKling Thanks, that's an excellent link! I think Jacob's answer makes the most sense to me - basically the explicit reassignment of the constructor property is a way of trying to fit the square peg of Javascript through the round hole of classical inheritance! :) – chrisf Sep 4 '12 at 10:01

Its not a bad practice. But there is a simple and standard way of overriding a function like below. When ever we define a 'function LolCat()' globally, its created under window so you can always code like below.

window.LolCat = function() {...};
LolCat.prototype.hello = function () { ... }
  • I don't think this really answers the question, and it's not really a good idea to put constructors in the global namespace. – chrisf Sep 4 '12 at 9:52

After many years of javascript, I stumbled upon a weird bug where a new instance of an object, then passed in a mixin had lost its __proto__ when its prototype class were declared with :

MyClass.prototype = {
   constructor: MyClass,
   myMethod(){ ...}
};

There is no anymore problem when using :

Object.assign( MyClass.prototype, {
   myMethod(){ ...}
});

Bonus : you don't have to reasign the construct anymore.

I guess it is because when we overwrite totally the prototype property, we wipe also its specials attributes and transform it as a normal one...maybe this one should not be writable by default...

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.