179

Is there a clean, preferably standard method of trimming leading and trailing whitespace from a string in C? I'd roll my own, but I would think this is a common problem with an equally common solution.

38 Answers 38

169

If you can modify the string:

// Note: This function returns a pointer to a substring of the original string.
// If the given string was allocated dynamically, the caller must not overwrite
// that pointer with the returned value, since the original pointer must be
// deallocated using the same allocator with which it was allocated.  The return
// value must NOT be deallocated using free() etc.
char *trimwhitespace(char *str)
{
  char *end;

  // Trim leading space
  while(isspace((unsigned char)*str)) str++;

  if(*str == 0)  // All spaces?
    return str;

  // Trim trailing space
  end = str + strlen(str) - 1;
  while(end > str && isspace((unsigned char)*end)) end--;

  // Write new null terminator character
  end[1] = '\0';

  return str;
}

If you can't modify the string, then you can use basically the same method:

// Stores the trimmed input string into the given output buffer, which must be
// large enough to store the result.  If it is too small, the output is
// truncated.
size_t trimwhitespace(char *out, size_t len, const char *str)
{
  if(len == 0)
    return 0;

  const char *end;
  size_t out_size;

  // Trim leading space
  while(isspace((unsigned char)*str)) str++;

  if(*str == 0)  // All spaces?
  {
    *out = 0;
    return 1;
  }

  // Trim trailing space
  end = str + strlen(str) - 1;
  while(end > str && isspace((unsigned char)*end)) end--;
  end++;

  // Set output size to minimum of trimmed string length and buffer size minus 1
  out_size = (end - str) < len-1 ? (end - str) : len-1;

  // Copy trimmed string and add null terminator
  memcpy(out, str, out_size);
  out[out_size] = 0;

  return out_size;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    Sorry, the first answer isn't good at all unless you don't care about memory leaks. You now have two overlapping strings (the original, which has it's trailing spaces trimmed, and the new one). Only the original string can be freed, but if you do, the second one points to freed memory. – David Nehme Nov 6 '08 at 15:11
  • 8
    @nvl: There is no memory being allocated, so there is no memory to free. – Adam Rosenfield Mar 16 '10 at 15:05
  • 16
    @nvl: No. str is a local variable, and changing it does not change the original pointer being passed in. Function calls in C are always pass-by-value, never pass-by-reference. – Adam Rosenfield Mar 17 '10 at 18:32
  • 12
    @Raj: There's nothing inherently wrong with returning a different address from the one that was passed in. There's no requirement here that the returned value be a valid argument of the free() function. Quite the opposite -- I designed this to avoid the need for memory allocation for efficiency. If the passed in address was allocated dynamically, then the caller is still responsible for freeing that memory, and the caller needs to be sure not to overwrite that value with the value returned here. – Adam Rosenfield Jun 13 '13 at 20:54
  • 3
    You have to cast the argument for isspace to unsigned char, otherwise you invoke undefined behavior. – Roland Illig Sep 18 '16 at 1:56
38

Here's one that shifts the string into the first position of your buffer. You might want this behavior so that if you dynamically allocated the string, you can still free it on the same pointer that trim() returns:

char *trim(char *str)
{
    size_t len = 0;
    char *frontp = str;
    char *endp = NULL;

    if( str == NULL ) { return NULL; }
    if( str[0] == '\0' ) { return str; }

    len = strlen(str);
    endp = str + len;

    /* Move the front and back pointers to address the first non-whitespace
     * characters from each end.
     */
    while( isspace((unsigned char) *frontp) ) { ++frontp; }
    if( endp != frontp )
    {
        while( isspace((unsigned char) *(--endp)) && endp != frontp ) {}
    }

    if( frontp != str && endp == frontp )
            *str = '\0';
    else if( str + len - 1 != endp )
            *(endp + 1) = '\0';

    /* Shift the string so that it starts at str so that if it's dynamically
     * allocated, we can still free it on the returned pointer.  Note the reuse
     * of endp to mean the front of the string buffer now.
     */
    endp = str;
    if( frontp != str )
    {
            while( *frontp ) { *endp++ = *frontp++; }
            *endp = '\0';
    }

    return str;
}

Test for correctness:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

/* Paste function from above here. */

int main()
{
    /* The test prints the following:
    [nothing to trim] -> [nothing to trim]
    [    trim the front] -> [trim the front]
    [trim the back     ] -> [trim the back]
    [    trim front and back     ] -> [trim front and back]
    [ trim one char front and back ] -> [trim one char front and back]
    [ trim one char front] -> [trim one char front]
    [trim one char back ] -> [trim one char back]
    [                   ] -> []
    [ ] -> []
    [a] -> [a]
    [] -> []
    */

    char *sample_strings[] =
    {
            "nothing to trim",
            "    trim the front",
            "trim the back     ",
            "    trim front and back     ",
            " trim one char front and back ",
            " trim one char front",
            "trim one char back ",
            "                   ",
            " ",
            "a",
            "",
            NULL
    };
    char test_buffer[64];
    char comparison_buffer[64];
    size_t index, compare_pos;

    for( index = 0; sample_strings[index] != NULL; ++index )
    {
        // Fill buffer with known value to verify we do not write past the end of the string.
        memset( test_buffer, 0xCC, sizeof(test_buffer) );
        strcpy( test_buffer, sample_strings[index] );
        memcpy( comparison_buffer, test_buffer, sizeof(comparison_buffer));

        printf("[%s] -> [%s]\n", sample_strings[index],
                                 trim(test_buffer));

        for( compare_pos = strlen(comparison_buffer);
             compare_pos < sizeof(comparison_buffer);
             ++compare_pos )
        {
            if( test_buffer[compare_pos] != comparison_buffer[compare_pos] )
            {
                printf("Unexpected change to buffer @ index %u: %02x (expected %02x)\n",
                    compare_pos, (unsigned char) test_buffer[compare_pos], (unsigned char) comparison_buffer[compare_pos]);
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

Source file was trim.c. Compiled with 'cc -Wall trim.c -o trim'.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You have to cast the argument for isspace to unsigned char, otherwise you invoke undefined behavior. – Roland Illig Sep 18 '16 at 1:58
  • @RolandIllig: Thanks, I never realized that was necessary. Fixed it. – indiv Sep 19 '16 at 19:00
  • @Simas: Why do you say that? The function calls isspace() so why would there be a difference between " " and "\n"? I added unit tests for newlines and it looks OK to me... ideone.com/bbVmqo – indiv Oct 17 '16 at 20:55
  • 1
    @indiv it will access invalid memory block when manually alloced. Namely this line: *(endp + 1) = '\0';. The example test on the answer uses a buffer of 64 which avoids this problem. – Simas Oct 18 '16 at 6:59
  • 1
    @nolandda: Thanks for the detail. I fixed it and updated the test to detect the buffer overrun since I don't have access to valgrind at the moment. – indiv Jul 26 '19 at 20:21
23

My solution. String must be changeable. The advantage above some of the other solutions that it moves the non-space part to the beginning so you can keep using the old pointer, in case you have to free() it later.

void trim(char * s) {
    char * p = s;
    int l = strlen(p);

    while(isspace(p[l - 1])) p[--l] = 0;
    while(* p && isspace(* p)) ++p, --l;

    memmove(s, p, l + 1);
}   

This version creates a copy of the string with strndup() instead of editing it in place. strndup() requires _GNU_SOURCE, so maybe you need to make your own strndup() with malloc() and strncpy().

char * trim(char * s) {
    int l = strlen(s);

    while(isspace(s[l - 1])) --l;
    while(* s && isspace(* s)) ++s, --l;

    return strndup(s, l);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    trim() invokes UB if s is "" as the first isspace() call would be isspace(p[-1]) and p[-1] does not necessarily reference a legal location. – chux - Reinstate Monica Nov 6 '13 at 16:39
  • 1
    You have to cast the argument for isspace to unsigned char, otherwise you invoke undefined behavior. – Roland Illig Sep 18 '16 at 1:58
  • 1
    should add if(l==0)return; to avoid zero-length str – ch271828n Mar 5 '19 at 0:01
11

Here's my C mini library for trimming left, right, both, all, in place and separate, and trimming a set of specified characters (or white space by default).

contents of strlib.h:

#ifndef STRLIB_H_
#define STRLIB_H_ 1
enum strtrim_mode_t {
    STRLIB_MODE_ALL       = 0, 
    STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT     = 0x01, 
    STRLIB_MODE_LEFT      = 0x02, 
    STRLIB_MODE_BOTH      = 0x03
};

char *strcpytrim(char *d, // destination
                 char *s, // source
                 int mode,
                 char *delim
                 );

char *strtriml(char *d, char *s);
char *strtrimr(char *d, char *s);
char *strtrim(char *d, char *s); 
char *strkill(char *d, char *s);

char *triml(char *s);
char *trimr(char *s);
char *trim(char *s);
char *kill(char *s);
#endif

contents of strlib.c:

#include <strlib.h>

char *strcpytrim(char *d, // destination
                 char *s, // source
                 int mode,
                 char *delim
                 ) {
    char *o = d; // save orig
    char *e = 0; // end space ptr.
    char dtab[256] = {0};
    if (!s || !d) return 0;

    if (!delim) delim = " \t\n\f";
    while (*delim) 
        dtab[*delim++] = 1;

    while ( (*d = *s++) != 0 ) { 
        if (!dtab[0xFF & (unsigned int)*d]) { // Not a match char
            e = 0;       // Reset end pointer
        } else {
            if (!e) e = d;  // Found first match.

            if ( mode == STRLIB_MODE_ALL || ((mode != STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT) && (d == o)) ) 
                continue;
        }
        d++;
    }
    if (mode != STRLIB_MODE_LEFT && e) { // for everything but trim_left, delete trailing matches.
        *e = 0;
    }
    return o;
}

// perhaps these could be inlined in strlib.h
char *strtriml(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_LEFT, 0); }
char *strtrimr(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT, 0); }
char *strtrim(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_BOTH, 0); }
char *strkill(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_ALL, 0); }

char *triml(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_LEFT, 0); }
char *trimr(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT, 0); }
char *trim(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_BOTH, 0); }
char *kill(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_ALL, 0); }

The one main routine does it all. It trims in place if src == dst, otherwise, it works like the strcpy routines. It trims a set of characters specified in the string delim, or white space if null. It trims left, right, both, and all (like tr). There is not much to it, and it iterates over the string only once. Some folks might complain that trim right starts on the left, however, no strlen is needed which starts on the left anyway. (One way or another you have to get to the end of the string for right trims, so you might as well do the work as you go.) There may be arguments to be made about pipelining and cache sizes and such -- who knows. Since the solution works from left to right and iterates only once, it can be expanded to work on streams as well. Limitations: it does not work on unicode strings.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I upvoted this and I know its old but I think there's a bug. dtab[*d] does not cast *d to unsigned int before using it as an array index. On a system with signed char this will read up to dtab[-127] which will cause bugs and possibly crash. – Zan Lynx Dec 12 '13 at 1:20
  • 2
    Potential undefined behavior on dtab[*delim++] because char index values must be cast to unsigned char. The code assumes 8-bit char. delim should be declared as const char *. dtab[0xFF & (unsigned int)*d] would clearer as dtab[(unsigned char)*d]. The code works on UTF-8 encoded strings, but will not strip non ASCII spacing sequences. – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 12:41
  • @michael-plainer, this looks interesting. Why don't you test it and put it on GitHub? – Daisuke Aramaki Jun 7 '19 at 12:15
9

Here is my attempt at a simple, yet correct in-place trim function.

void trim(char *str)
{
    int i;
    int begin = 0;
    int end = strlen(str) - 1;

    while (isspace((unsigned char) str[begin]))
        begin++;

    while ((end >= begin) && isspace((unsigned char) str[end]))
        end--;

    // Shift all characters back to the start of the string array.
    for (i = begin; i <= end; i++)
        str[i - begin] = str[i];

    str[i - begin] = '\0'; // Null terminate string.
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Suggest changing to while ((end >= begin) && isspace(str[end])) to prevent UB when str is "". Prevents str[-1]`. – chux - Reinstate Monica Nov 6 '13 at 16:43
  • Btw, I have to change this to str[i - begin + 1] in order to works – truongnm Sep 9 '16 at 8:53
  • 1
    You have to cast the argument for isspace to unsigned char, otherwise you invoke undefined behavior. – Roland Illig Sep 18 '16 at 2:00
  • @RolandIllig, why would it be undefined behavior? The function is intended to work with chars. – wovano Mar 5 at 23:32
  • @wovano No, it isn't. The functions from <ctype.h> are intended to work with ints, which represent either unsigned char or the special value EOF. See stackoverflow.com/q/7131026/225757. – Roland Illig Mar 5 at 23:43
8

Late to the trim party

Features:
1. Trim the beginning quickly, as in a number of other answers.
2. After going to the end, trimming the right with only 1 test per loop. Like @jfm3, but works for an all white-space string)
3. To avoid undefined behavior when char is a signed char, cast *s to unsigned char.

Character handling "In all cases the argument is an int, the value of which shall be representable as an unsigned char or shall equal the value of the macro EOF. If the argument has any other value, the behavior is undefined." C11 §7.4 1

#include <ctype.h>

// Return a pointer to the trimmed string
char *string_trim_inplace(char *s) {
  while (isspace((unsigned char) *s)) s++;
  if (*s) {
    char *p = s;
    while (*p) p++;
    while (isspace((unsigned char) *(--p)));
    p[1] = '\0';
  }

  // If desired, shift the trimmed string

  return s;
}

@chqrlie commented the above does not shift the trimmed string. To do so....

// Return a pointer to the (shifted) trimmed string
char *string_trim_inplace(char *s) {
  char *original = s;
  size_t len = 0;

  while (isspace((unsigned char) *s)) {
    s++;
  } 
  if (*s) {
    char *p = s;
    while (*p) p++;
    while (isspace((unsigned char) *(--p)));
    p[1] = '\0';
    // len = (size_t) (p - s);   // older errant code
    len = (size_t) (p - s + 1);  // Thanks to @theriver
  }

  return (s == original) ? s : memmove(original, s, len + 1);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Yay, finally someone who knows about the ctype undefined behavior. – Roland Illig Sep 18 '16 at 2:21
  • 2
    @chux I think it should be len = (size_t) (p-s)+1; otherwise the last letter overlaps. – theriver Aug 31 '19 at 20:30
4

Here's a solution similar to @adam-rosenfields in-place modification routine but without needlessly resorting to strlen(). Like @jkramer, the string is left-adjusted within the buffer so you can free the same pointer. Not optimal for large strings since it does not use memmove. Includes the ++/-- operators that @jfm3 mentions. FCTX-based unit tests included.

#include <ctype.h>

void trim(char * const a)
{
    char *p = a, *q = a;
    while (isspace(*q))            ++q;
    while (*q)                     *p++ = *q++;
    *p = '\0';
    while (p > a && isspace(*--p)) *p = '\0';
}

/* See http://fctx.wildbearsoftware.com/ */
#include "fct.h"

FCT_BGN()
{
    FCT_QTEST_BGN(trim)
    {
        { char s[] = "";      trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("",    s); } // Trivial
        { char s[] = "   ";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("",    s); } // Trivial
        { char s[] = "\t";    trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("",    s); } // Trivial
        { char s[] = "a";     trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // NOP
        { char s[] = "abc";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("abc", s); } // NOP
        { char s[] = "  a";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // Leading
        { char s[] = "  a c"; trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a c", s); } // Leading
        { char s[] = "a  ";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // Trailing
        { char s[] = "a c  "; trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a c", s); } // Trailing
        { char s[] = " a ";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // Both
        { char s[] = " a c "; trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a c", s); } // Both

        // Villemoes pointed out an edge case that corrupted memory.  Thank you.
        // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/122616/#comment23332594_4505533
        {
          char s[] = "a     ";       // Buffer with whitespace before s + 2
          trim(s + 2);               // Trim "    " containing only whitespace
          fct_chk_eq_str("", s + 2); // Ensure correct result from the trim
          fct_chk_eq_str("a ", s);   // Ensure preceding buffer not mutated
        }

        // doukremt suggested I investigate this test case but
        // did not indicate the specific behavior that was objectionable.
        // http://stackoverflow.com/posts/comments/33571430
        {
          char s[] = "         foobar";  // Shifted across whitespace
          trim(s);                       // Trim
          fct_chk_eq_str("foobar", s);   // Leading string is correct

          // Here is what the algorithm produces:
          char r[16] = { 'f', 'o', 'o', 'b', 'a', 'r', '\0', ' ',                     
                         ' ', 'f', 'o', 'o', 'b', 'a', 'r', '\0'};
          fct_chk_eq_int(0, memcmp(s, r, sizeof(s)));
        }
    }
    FCT_QTEST_END();
}
FCT_END();
| improve this answer | |
  • This solution is downright dangerous! If the original string does not contain any non-whitespace characters, the last line of trim happily overwrites whatever precedes a, if those bytes happen to contain 'whitespace' bytes. Compile this without optimizations and see what happens to y: unsigned x = 0x20202020; char s[4] = " "; unsigned y = 0x20202020; printf("&x,&s,&y = %p,%p,%p\n", &x, &s, &y); printf("x, [s], y = %08x, [%s], %08x\n", x, s, y); trim_whitespace(s); printf("x, [s], y = %08x, [%s], %08x\n", x, s, y); – Villemoes Apr 30 '13 at 11:40
  • @Villemoes, thank you for the bug report. I've updated the logic to avoid walking off the left side of the buffer when the string contains only whitespace. Does this new version address your concerns? – Rhys Ulerich Apr 30 '13 at 17:20
  • Language lawyers would probably shout at you for the mere thought of speculating about creating a pointer to the char preceding the one 'a' points to (which is what your '--p' will do). In the real world, you're probably ok. But you can also just change '>=' to '>' and move the decrement of p to 'isspace(*--p)'. – Villemoes May 2 '13 at 12:42
  • I think the lawyers would be okay as it's just comparing an address without touching it, but I do like your suggestion on the decrement too. I've updated it accordingly. Thanks. – Rhys Ulerich May 2 '13 at 16:35
  • 1
    doukremt, is your concern that the entire buffer after foobar is not filled with zeros? If so, it'd be quite a bit more helpful if you said so explicitly rather than throwing vague rocks. – Rhys Ulerich Mar 2 '14 at 15:22
3

Another one, with one line doing the real job:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
   const char *target = "   haha   ";
   char buf[256];
   sscanf(target, "%s", buf); // Trimming on both sides occurs here
   printf("<%s>\n", buf);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Good idea to use scanf; but his will only work with a single word which may not be what the OP wanted (i.e. trimming " a b c " should probably result in "a b c", while your single scanf just results in "a"). So we need a loop, and a counter for the skipped chars with the %n conversion specifier, and in the end it's just simpler to do it by hand, I'm afraid. – Peter - Reinstate Monica Jan 13 '16 at 12:35
  • Very useful when you want the first word of the string disregarding any initial spaces. – J...S Sep 28 '17 at 18:36
3

I didn't like most of these answers because they did one or more of the following...

  1. Returned a different pointer inside the original pointer's string (kind of a pain to juggle two different pointers to the same thing).
  2. Made gratuitous use of things like strlen() that pre-iterate the entire string.
  3. Used non-portable OS-specific lib functions.
  4. Backscanned.
  5. Used comparison to ' ' instead of isspace() so that TAB / CR / LF are preserved.
  6. Wasted memory with large static buffers.
  7. Wasted cycles with high-cost functions like sscanf/sprintf.

Here is my version:

void fnStrTrimInPlace(char *szWrite) {

    const char *szWriteOrig = szWrite;
    char       *szLastSpace = szWrite, *szRead = szWrite;
    int        bNotSpace;

    // SHIFT STRING, STARTING AT FIRST NON-SPACE CHAR, LEFTMOST
    while( *szRead != '\0' ) {

        bNotSpace = !isspace((unsigned char)(*szRead));

        if( (szWrite != szWriteOrig) || bNotSpace ) {

            *szWrite = *szRead;
            szWrite++;

            // TRACK POINTER TO LAST NON-SPACE
            if( bNotSpace )
                szLastSpace = szWrite;
        }

        szRead++;
    }

    // TERMINATE AFTER LAST NON-SPACE (OR BEGINNING IF THERE WAS NO NON-SPACE)
    *szLastSpace = '\0';
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You have to cast the argument for isspace to unsigned char, otherwise you invoke undefined behavior. – Roland Illig Sep 18 '16 at 2:23
  • As this answer is concerned about "Wasted cycles" , note that code unnecessarily copies the entire sting when there is no space. A leading while (isspace((unsigned char) *szWrite)) szWrite++; would prevent that. Code also copies all the trailing white space. – chux - Reinstate Monica Jun 27 '19 at 11:16
  • @chux this implementation mutates in-place with separate read & write pointers (as opposed to returning a new pointer in a different location), so the suggestion for jumping szWrite to the first non-space on line-one would leave the leading space in the original string. – Jason Stewart Jun 28 '19 at 17:34
  • @chux, you are correct that it does copy trailing white-space (before adding a null after the last non-space character), but that's the price I chose to pay to avoid pre-scanning the string. For modest amounts of trailing WS, it is cheaper to just copy the bytes rather than to pre-scan the entire string for the last non-WS char. For large amounts of trailing WS, pre-scanning would probably be worth the reduction in writes. – Jason Stewart Jun 28 '19 at 17:43
  • @chux, for the "copies when there is no space" situation, only performing *szWrite = *szRead when the pointers are not equal would skip the writes in that case, but then we've added another comparison/branch. With modern CPU/MMU/BP, I have no idea if that check would be a loss or a gain. With simpler processors and memory architectures, it's cheaper to just do the copy and skip the compare. – Jason Stewart Jun 28 '19 at 18:12
2

I'm not sure what you consider "painless."

C strings are pretty painful. We can find the first non-whitespace character position trivially:

while (isspace(* p)) p++;

We can find the last non-whitespace character position with two similar trivial moves:

while (* q) q++;
do { q--; } while (isspace(* q));

(I have spared you the pain of using the * and ++ operators at the same time.)

The question now is what do you do with this? The datatype at hand isn't really a big robust abstract String that is easy to think about, but instead really barely any more than an array of storage bytes. Lacking a robust data type, it is impossible to write a function that will do the same as PHperytonby's chomp function. What would such a function in C return?

| improve this answer | |
  • This work well unless the string is made up of all white-spaces. Need a one time check before do { q--; } ... to know *q != 0. – chux - Reinstate Monica Nov 7 '14 at 5:07
2

Use a string library, for instance:

Ustr *s1 = USTR1(\7, " 12345 ");

ustr_sc_trim_cstr(&s1, " ");
assert(ustr_cmp_cstr_eq(s1, "12345"));

...as you say this is a "common" problem, yes you need to include a #include or so and it's not included in libc but don't go inventing your own hack job storing random pointers and size_t's that way only leads to buffer overflows.

| improve this answer | |
2

If you're using glib, then you can use g_strstrip

| improve this answer | |
2

Very late to the party...

Single-pass forward-scanning solution with no backtracking. Every character in the source string is tested exactly once twice. (So it should be faster than most of the other solutions here, especially if the source string has a lot of trailing spaces.)

This includes two solutions, one to copy and trim a source string into another destination string, and the other to trim the source string in place. Both functions use the same code.

The (modifiable) string is moved in-place, so the original pointer to it remains unchanged.

#include <stddef.h>
#include <ctype.h>

char * trim2(char *d, const char *s)
{
    // Sanity checks
    if (s == NULL  ||  d == NULL)
        return NULL;

    // Skip leading spaces        
    const unsigned char * p = (const unsigned char *)s;
    while (isspace(*p))
        p++;

    // Copy the string
    unsigned char * dst = (unsigned char *)d;   // d and s can be the same
    unsigned char * end = dst;
    while (*p != '\0')
    {
        if (!isspace(*dst++ = *p++))
            end = dst;
    }

    // Truncate trailing spaces
    *end = '\0';
    return d;
}

char * trim(char *s)
{
    return trim2(s, s);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Every character in the source string is tested exactly once: not really, most characters in the source string are tested twice: compared to '\0' and then tested with isspace(). It seems wasteful to test all characters with isspace(). Backtracking from the end of the string should be more efficient for non pathological cases. – chqrlie Dec 22 '18 at 8:54
  • @chqrlie - Yes, each character does get tested twice. I would like to see this code actually tested, especially given strings with lots of trailing spaces, as compared to other algorithms here. – David R Tribble Jan 24 '19 at 15:47
  • trim() OK. Corner case: trim2(char *d, const char *s) has trouble when d,s overlap and s < d. – chux - Reinstate Monica Jun 27 '19 at 11:29
  • @chux - In that corner case, how should trim() behave? You're asking to trim and copy a string into memory occupied by the string itself. Unlike memmove(), this requires determining the length of the source string before doing the trim itself, which requires scanning the entire string an additional time. Better to write a different rtrim2() function that knows to copy the source to the destination backwards, and probably takes an additional source string length argument. – David R Tribble Jul 11 '19 at 19:32
1

Just to keep this growing, one more option with a modifiable string:

void trimString(char *string)
{
    size_t i = 0, j = strlen(string);
    while (j > 0 && isspace((unsigned char)string[j - 1])) string[--j] = '\0';
    while (isspace((unsigned char)string[i])) i++;
    if (i > 0) memmove(string, string + i, j - i + 1);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    strlen() returns a size_t that can exceed the range of int. white space is not restricted to the space character. Finally but most important: Undefined behavior on strcpy(string, string + i * sizeof(char)); because source and destination arrays overlap. Use memmove() instead of strcpy(). – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 12:31
  • @chqrlie you are right, just included your suggestions. I understand that copying when the source and the destination overlap can cause undefined behavior, but just want to point that in this particular case this shouldn't cause any problem since we are always going to copy from a later position of memory to the beginning, thanks for the feedback. – wallek876 Oct 9 '16 at 7:42
  • 1
    it does not matter how the source and destination arrays overlap, it is undefined behavior. Do not rely on the assumption that copying may take place one byte at a time along increasing addresses. Also I forgot to mention that while (isspace((int)string[i])) string[i--] = '\0'; may loop beyond the beginning of the string. You should combine this loop with the previous and following lines and write while (i > 0 && isspace((unsigned char)string[--i])) { string[i] = '\0'; } size_t end = i; – chqrlie Oct 10 '16 at 23:49
  • @chqrlie good point, a string with all white spaces would have caused to loop past the beginning, didn't thought of that. – wallek876 Oct 11 '16 at 6:15
  • Actually, my suggestion was incorrect as end did not point to the trailing null byte and your end = ++i; still had a problem for strings containing all whitespace characters. I just fixed the code. – chqrlie Oct 11 '16 at 6:18
1

I know there have many answers, but I post my answer here to see if my solution is good enough.

// Trims leading whitespace chars in left `str`, then copy at almost `n - 1` chars
// into the `out` buffer in which copying might stop when the first '\0' occurs, 
// and finally append '\0' to the position of the last non-trailing whitespace char.
// Reture the length the trimed string which '\0' is not count in like strlen().
size_t trim(char *out, size_t n, const char *str)
{
    // do nothing
    if(n == 0) return 0;    

    // ptr stop at the first non-leading space char
    while(isspace(*str)) str++;    

    if(*str == '\0') {
        out[0] = '\0';
        return 0;
    }    

    size_t i = 0;    

    // copy char to out until '\0' or i == n - 1
    for(i = 0; i < n - 1 && *str != '\0'; i++){
        out[i] = *str++;
    }    

    // deal with the trailing space
    while(isspace(out[--i]));    

    out[++i] = '\0';
    return i;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Note: isspace(*str) UB when *str < 0. – chux - Reinstate Monica Jun 27 '19 at 11:41
  • 1
    Use of size_t n is good, yet the interface does not inform the caller in any way when about n being too small for a complete trimmed string. Consider trim(out, 12, "delete data not") – chux - Reinstate Monica Jun 27 '19 at 11:46
1

The easiest way to skip leading spaces in a string is, imho,

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
char *foo="     teststring      ";
char *bar;
sscanf(foo,"%s",bar);
printf("String is >%s<\n",bar);
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This will not work for strings with spaces in the middle, such as " foo bar ". – David R Tribble Jul 9 '18 at 17:00
1

Ok this is my take on the question. I believe it's the most concise solution that modifies the string in place (free will work) and avoids any UB. For small strings, it's probably faster than a solution involving memmove.

void stripWS_LT(char *str)
{
    char *a = str, *b = str;
    while (isspace((unsigned char)*a)) a++;
    while (*b = *a++)  b++;
    while (b > str && isspace((unsigned char)*--b)) *b = 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
1
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

char *trim_space(char *in)
{
    char *out = NULL;
    int len;
    if (in) {
        len = strlen(in);
        while(len && isspace(in[len - 1])) --len;
        while(len && *in && isspace(*in)) ++in, --len;
        if (len) {
            out = strndup(in, len);
        }
    }
    return out;
}

isspace helps to trim all white spaces.

  • Run a first loop to check from last byte for space character and reduce the length variable
  • Run a second loop to check from first byte for space character and reduce the length variable and increment char pointer.
  • Finally if length variable is more than 0, then use strndup to create new string buffer by excluding spaces.
| improve this answer | |
  • Just a little nitpick, strndup() is not part of the C standard but only Posix. But as it is quite easy to implement it's not a big deal. – Patrick Schlüter Jan 24 '19 at 10:34
  • trim_space("") returns NULL. I'd expect a pointer to "". int len; should be size_t len;. isspace(in[len - 1]) UB when in[len - 1] < 0. – chux - Reinstate Monica Jun 27 '19 at 11:54
  • An initial while (isspace((unsigned char) *in) in++; before len = strlen(in); would be more efficient than the later while(len && *in && isspace(*in)) ++in, --len; – chux - Reinstate Monica Jun 27 '19 at 11:58
1

This one is short and simple, uses for-loops and doesn't overwrite the string boundaries. You can replace the test with isspace() if needed.

void trim (char *s)         // trim leading and trailing spaces+tabs
{
 int i,j,k, len;

 j=k=0;
 len = strlen(s);
                    // find start of string
 for (i=0; i<len; i++) if ((s[i]!=32) && (s[i]!=9)) { j=i; break; }
                    // find end of string+1
 for (i=len-1; i>=j; i--) if ((s[i]!=32) && (s[i]!=9)) { k=i+1; break;} 

 if (k<=j) {s[0]=0; return;}        // all whitespace (j==k==0)

 len=k-j;
 for (i=0; i<len; i++) s[i] = s[j++];   // shift result to start of string
 s[i]=0;                // end the string

}//_trim
| improve this answer | |
0

Personally, I'd roll my own. You can use strtok, but you need to take care with doing so (particularly if you're removing leading characters) that you know what memory is what.

Getting rid of trailing spaces is easy, and pretty safe, as you can just put a 0 in over the top of the last space, counting back from the end. Getting rid of leading spaces means moving things around. If you want to do it in place (probably sensible) you can just keep shifting everything back one character until there's no leading space. Or, to be more efficient, you could find the index of the first non-space character, and shift everything back by that number. Or, you could just use a pointer to the first non-space character (but then you need to be careful in the same way as you do with strtok).

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    strtok is generally not a very good tool to use - not least because it is not re-entrant. If you stay inside a single function, it can be used safely, but if there's any possibility of threads or calling other functions which might themselves use strtok, you are in trouble. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '08 at 18:48
0
#include "stdafx.h"
#include "malloc.h"
#include "string.h"

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

  char *ptr = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*30);
  strcpy(ptr,"            Hel  lo    wo           rl   d G    eo rocks!!!    by shahil    sucks b i          g       tim           e");

  int i = 0, j = 0;

  while(ptr[j]!='\0')
  {

      if(ptr[j] == ' ' )
      {
          j++;
          ptr[i] = ptr[j];
      }
      else
      {
          i++;
          j++;
          ptr[i] = ptr[j];
      }
  }


  printf("\noutput-%s\n",ptr);
        return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This made me laugh because I thought dreamlax had edited the test string to include "sucks big time". Nope. The original author is just honest. – James Morris Jun 15 '10 at 7:28
  • 1
    Don't use this code. It produces a buffer overflow. – Roland Illig Sep 18 '16 at 2:04
0

A bit late to the game, but I'll throw my routines into the fray. They're probably not the most absolute efficient, but I believe they're correct and they're simple (with rtrim() pushing the complexity envelope):

#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

/*
    Public domain implementations of in-place string trim functions

    Michael Burr
    michael.burr@nth-element.com
    2010
*/

char* ltrim(char* s) 
{
    char* newstart = s;

    while (isspace( *newstart)) {
        ++newstart;
    }

    // newstart points to first non-whitespace char (which might be '\0')
    memmove( s, newstart, strlen( newstart) + 1); // don't forget to move the '\0' terminator

    return s;
}


char* rtrim( char* s)
{
    char* end = s + strlen( s);

    // find the last non-whitespace character
    while ((end != s) && isspace( *(end-1))) {
            --end;
    }

    // at this point either (end == s) and s is either empty or all whitespace
    //      so it needs to be made empty, or
    //      end points just past the last non-whitespace character (it might point
    //      at the '\0' terminator, in which case there's no problem writing
    //      another there).    
    *end = '\0';

    return s;
}

char*  trim( char* s)
{
    return rtrim( ltrim( s));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    you should cast the char argument to isspace() to (unsigned char) to avoid undefined behavior on potentially negative values. Also avoid moving the string if in ltrim() if not necessary. – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 13:34
0

Most of the answers so far do one of the following:

  1. Backtrack at the end of the string (i.e. find the end of the string and then seek backwards until a non-space character is found,) or
  2. Call strlen() first, making a second pass through the whole string.

This version makes only one pass and does not backtrack. Hence it may perform better than the others, though only if it is common to have hundreds of trailing spaces (which is not unusual when dealing with the output of a SQL query.)

static char const WHITESPACE[] = " \t\n\r";

static void get_trim_bounds(char  const *s,
                            char const **firstWord,
                            char const **trailingSpace)
{
    char const *lastWord;
    *firstWord = lastWord = s + strspn(s, WHITESPACE);
    do
    {
        *trailingSpace = lastWord + strcspn(lastWord, WHITESPACE);
        lastWord = *trailingSpace + strspn(*trailingSpace, WHITESPACE);
    }
    while (*lastWord != '\0');
}

char *copy_trim(char const *s)
{
    char const *firstWord, *trailingSpace;
    char *result;
    size_t newLength;

    get_trim_bounds(s, &firstWord, &trailingSpace);
    newLength = trailingSpace - firstWord;

    result = malloc(newLength + 1);
    memcpy(result, firstWord, newLength);
    result[newLength] = '\0';
    return result;
}

void inplace_trim(char *s)
{
    char const *firstWord, *trailingSpace;
    size_t newLength;

    get_trim_bounds(s, &firstWord, &trailingSpace);
    newLength = trailingSpace - firstWord;

    memmove(s, firstWord, newLength);
    s[newLength] = '\0';
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    If you are concerned with performance, do not use strspn() and strcspn() in a tight loop. This is very inefficient and the overhead will dwarf the unproven advantage of the single forward pass. strlen() is usually expanded inline with very efficient code, not a real concern. Trimming the beginning and end of the string will be much faster than testing every character in the string for whiteness even in the special case of strings with very few or no non-white characters. – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 13:31
0

This is the shortest possible implementation I can think of:

static const char *WhiteSpace=" \n\r\t";
char* trim(char *t)
{
    char *e=t+(t!=NULL?strlen(t):0);               // *e initially points to end of string
    if (t==NULL) return;
    do --e; while (strchr(WhiteSpace, *e) && e>=t);  // Find last char that is not \r\n\t
    *(++e)=0;                                      // Null-terminate
    e=t+strspn (t,WhiteSpace);                           // Find first char that is not \t
    return e>t?memmove(t,e,strlen(e)+1):t;                  // memmove string contents and terminator
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    How about this: char *trim(char *s) { char *p = s, *e = s + strlen(s); while (e > s && isspace((unsigned char)e[-1])) { *--e = '\0'; } while (isspace((unsigned char)*p)) { p++; } if (p > s) { memmove(s, p, e + 1 - p); } return s; } – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 13:23
0

These functions will modify the original buffer, so if dynamically allocated, the original pointer can be freed.

#include <string.h>

void rstrip(char *string)
{
  int l;
  if (!string)
    return;
  l = strlen(string) - 1;
  while (isspace(string[l]) && l >= 0)
    string[l--] = 0;
}

void lstrip(char *string)
{
  int i, l;
  if (!string)
    return;
  l = strlen(string);
  while (isspace(string[(i = 0)]))
    while(i++ < l)
      string[i-1] = string[i];
}

void strip(char *string)
{
  lstrip(string);
  rstrip(string);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • rstrip() invokes undefined behavior on the empty string. lstrip() is unnecessarily slow on string with a long initial portion of whitespace characters. isspace() should not be passed a char argument because it invokes undefined behavior on negative values different than EOF. – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 13:09
0

What do you think about using StrTrim function defined in header Shlwapi.h.? It is straight forward rather defining on your own.
Details can be found on:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb773454(v=vs.85).aspx

If you have
char ausCaptain[]="GeorgeBailey ";
StrTrim(ausCaptain," ");
This will give ausCaptain as "GeorgeBailey" not "GeorgeBailey ".

| improve this answer | |
0

To trim my strings from the both sides I use the oldie but the gooody ;) It can trim anything with ascii less than a space, meaning that the control chars will be trimmed also !

char *trimAll(char *strData)
{
  unsigned int L = strlen(strData);
  if(L > 0){ L--; }else{ return strData; }
  size_t S = 0, E = L;
  while((!(strData[S] > ' ') || !(strData[E] > ' ')) && (S >= 0) && (S <= L) && (E >= 0) && (E <= L))
  {
    if(strData[S] <= ' '){ S++; }
    if(strData[E] <= ' '){ E--; }
  }
  if(S == 0 && E == L){ return strData; } // Nothing to be done
  if((S >= 0) && (S <= L) && (E >= 0) && (E <= L)){
    L = E - S + 1;
    memmove(strData,&strData[S],L); strData[L] = '\0';
  }else{ strData[0] = '\0'; }
  return strData;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • You should use size_t instead of unsigned int. The code has a lot of redundant tests and invokes undefined behavior on strncpy(strData,&strData[S],L) because the source and destination arrays overlap. Use memmove() instead of strncpy(). – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 12:24
  • In this case it is ok as the destination address always has smaller index than the source, but yes memmove will be better indeed. – Деян Добромиров Oct 11 '16 at 10:37
  • no it is not OK. it does not matter how the source and destination arrays overlap, it invokes undefined behavior because you cannot safely make assumptions on the implementation of the library functions beyond their standard specification. Modern compilers tend to take unfair advantage of situations with potential undefined behavior, play it safe and stay away from UB, and do not let newbie make unsafe assumptions. – chqrlie Oct 11 '16 at 14:23
0

I'm only including code because the code posted so far seems suboptimal (and I don't have the rep to comment yet.)

void inplace_trim(char* s)
{
    int start, end = strlen(s);
    for (start = 0; isspace(s[start]); ++start) {}
    if (s[start]) {
        while (end > 0 && isspace(s[end-1]))
            --end;
        memmove(s, &s[start], end - start);
    }
    s[end - start] = '\0';
}

char* copy_trim(const char* s)
{
    int start, end;
    for (start = 0; isspace(s[start]); ++start) {}
    for (end = strlen(s); end > 0 && isspace(s[end-1]); --end) {}
    return strndup(s + start, end - start);
}

strndup() is a GNU extension. If you don't have it or something equivalent, roll your own. For example:

r = strdup(s + start);
r[end-start] = '\0';
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    isspace(0) is defined to be false, you can simplify both functions. Also move the memmove() inside the if block. – chqrlie Oct 8 '16 at 13:39
0

Here i use the dynamic memory allocation to trim the input string to the function trimStr. First, we find how many non-empty characters exist in the input string. Then, we allocate a character array with that size and taking care of the null terminated character. When we use this function, we need to free the memory inside of main function.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

char *trimStr(char *str){
char *tmp = str;
printf("input string %s\n",str);
int nc = 0;

while(*tmp!='\0'){
  if (*tmp != ' '){
  nc++;
 }
 tmp++;
}
printf("total nonempty characters are %d\n",nc);
char *trim = NULL;

trim = malloc(sizeof(char)*(nc+1));
if (trim == NULL) return NULL;
tmp = str;
int ne = 0;

while(*tmp!='\0'){
  if (*tmp != ' '){
     trim[ne] = *tmp;
   ne++;
 }
 tmp++;
}
trim[nc] = '\0';

printf("trimmed string is %s\n",trim);

return trim; 
 }


int main(void){

char str[] = " s ta ck ove r fl o w  ";

char *trim = trimStr(str);

if (trim != NULL )free(trim);

return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Here is how I do it. It trims the string in place, so no worry about deallocating a returned string or losing the pointer to an allocated string. It may not be the shortest answer possible, but it should be clear to most readers.

#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>
void trim_str(char *s)
{
    const size_t s_len = strlen(s);

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < s_len; i++)
    {
        if (!isspace( (unsigned char) s[i] )) break;
    }

    if (i == s_len)
    {
        // s is an empty string or contains only space characters

        s[0] = '\0';
    }
    else
    {
        // s contains non-space characters

        const char *non_space_beginning = s + i;

        char *non_space_ending = s + s_len - 1;
        while ( isspace( (unsigned char) *non_space_ending ) ) non_space_ending--;

        size_t trimmed_s_len = non_space_ending - non_space_beginning + 1;

        if (s != non_space_beginning)
        {
            // Non-space characters exist in the beginning of s

            memmove(s, non_space_beginning, trimmed_s_len);
        }

        s[trimmed_s_len] = '\0';
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • absolutely clear for readers, but strlen performs another loop.. :) – ingconti Mar 3 '19 at 11:00

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