2

I'm working on a project using freeglut and glew, although I think that's irrelevant to my problem. These first line outputs the values that I expect it to. (-1, -1). Note: mikesVertices[0].x and mikesVertices[0].y are of the type GLfloat.

std::cout << "(" << mikesVertices[0].x << ", " << mikesVertices[0].y << ")" << endl;

However, these two lines ( which come immediately after..

GLfloat x = mikesVertices[0].x;
std::cout << "x: " << x << endl;

outputs an incorrect value for x. (1.92749e-039)

The reason I am trying to do this is because I want to pass the values to a function, but the function is also getting the wrong values. Any help would be appreciated.

EDIT: mikesVertices is a pointer to a vec2 object ( written by Angel, I've shown parts out of it which I think seemed necessary )

struct vec2 {

GLfloat  x;
GLfloat  y;

//
//  --- Constructors and Destructors ---
//

vec2( GLfloat s = GLfloat(0.0) ) :
x(s), y(s) {}

vec2( GLfloat x, GLfloat y ) :
x(x), y(y) {}

vec2( const vec2& v )
{ x = v.x;  y = v.y;  }

//
//  --- Insertion and Extraction Operators ---
//

friend std::ostream& operator << ( std::ostream& os, const vec2& v ) {
return os << "( " << v.x << ", " << v.y <<  " )";
}

friend std::istream& operator >> ( std::istream& is, vec2& v )
{ return is >> v.x >> v.y ; }

//
//  --- Conversion Operators ---
//

operator const GLfloat* () const
{ return static_cast<const GLfloat*>( &x ); }

operator GLfloat* ()
{ return static_cast<GLfloat*>( &x ); }
6
  • 1
    Could we see the data structure of mikesVertices, along with the declaration of the variable?
    – Yno
    Sep 4, 2012 at 14:41
  • 6
    Please post a "Short, Self Contained, Correct (Compilable), Example". Also, GLfloat is almost certainly a typedef of float, so this really has nothing to do with OpenGL. Sep 4, 2012 at 14:41
  • I can't reproduce this. Could you provide compiler and options? Sep 4, 2012 at 14:47
  • 3
    First guess: "mikesVertices" has been deallocated, and it just happens to still have the correct values until after that complicated and uses-a-bit-of-stack-and-heap std::cout stuff is called Sep 4, 2012 at 14:55
  • @ChristianStieber seems to be right, I'll just store the variable before I use it for a temporary fix. Thanks for the help. Sep 4, 2012 at 15:08

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