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As per the HTTP specification:

If a resource has been created on the origin server, the response SHOULD be 201 (Created) and contain an entity which describes the status of the request and refers to the new resource, and a Location header (see section 14.30).

Does this mean that POST request should always send redirect URI in Location header with no response body?

2 Answers 2

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It is perfectly acceptable to specify a response body and use the Location header at the same time. When using the Location header with a 201 response, you're not redirecting the client, you're just telling it where it can find the resource in future.

Redirects only apply to 3xx responses.

The W3C docs for this explain further, though the text is actually quite ambiguous:

The Location response-header field is used to redirect the recipient to a location other than the Request-URI for completion of the request or identification of a new resource. For 201 (Created) responses, the Location is that of the new resource which was created by the request. For 3xx responses, the location SHOULD indicate the server's preferred URI for automatic redirection to the resource.

I read that as saying "...redirect... or... identif[y]... new resource", but it's not exactly a plain English sentence.

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  • 9
    What is the answer? is it "in a word, no" or "you can specify a response body and use the Location header at the same time"? Aug 4, 2009 at 13:38
  • 6
    I was replying to the question at the end of the body text, not the question in the title.
    – Rob Knight
    Aug 4, 2009 at 15:30
  • I was thinking on the same lines. Just wanted to make doubly sure. Thanks Rob. Aug 5, 2009 at 2:24
  • I guess that the question that comes to mind is : Does it ever make sense to send data in the response's body ? Will the client use it ? Or just discard it and go for the new resource ? I guess that depends on the implementation of the client, isn't it ?
    – cassepipe
    Nov 16, 2022 at 13:09
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Based on paragraph 9.5 of the HTTP 1.1 specification, which is the reference for questions like that, here is my understanding:

Yes you can, and the specification is clear about what you can do and how to do it:

The action performed by the POST method might not result in a resource that can be identified by a URI. In this case, either 200 (OK) or 204 (No Content) is the appropriate response status, depending on whether or not the response includes an entity that describes the result.

If a resource has been created on the origin server, the response SHOULD be 201 (Created) and contain an entity which describes the status of the request and refers to the new resource, and a Location header (see section 14.30).

Responses to this method are not cacheable, unless the response includes appropriate Cache-Control or Expires header fields. However, the 303 (See Other) response can be used to direct the user agent to retrieve a cacheable resource.

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