76

What is the capacity() of an std::vector which is created using the default constuctor? I know that the size() is zero. Can we state that a default constructed vector does not call heap memory allocation?

This way it would be possible to create an array with an arbitrary reserve using a single allocation, like std::vector<int> iv; iv.reserve(2345);. Let's say that for some reason, I do not want to start the size() on 2345.

For example, on Linux (g++ 4.4.5, kernel 2.6.32 amd64)

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
  using namespace std;
  cout << vector<int>().capacity() << "," << vector<int>(10).capacity() << endl;
  return 0;
}

printed 0,10. Is it a rule, or is it STL vendor dependent?

  • 7
    Standard doesn't specifies anything about initial capacity of vector but most implementations use 0 . – Mr.Anubis Sep 4 '12 at 20:40
  • 10
    There's no guarantee, but I would seriously question the quality of any implementation that allocated memory without me requesting any. – Mike Seymour Sep 4 '12 at 20:46
  • 2
    @MikeSeymour Disagree. A really high performance implementation might contain a small inline buffer, in which case setting the initial capacity() to that would make sense. – alastair Jul 15 '16 at 19:12
  • 5
    @alastair When using swap all iterators and references remain valid (except end()s). That means that an inline buffer is not possible. – Notinlist Jul 17 '16 at 13:53
60

The standard doesn't specify what the initial capacity of a container should be, so you're relying on the implementation. A common implementation will start the capacity at zero, but there's no guarantee. On the other hand there's no way to better your strategy of std::vector<int> iv; iv.reserve(2345); so stick with it.

  • 1
    I don't buy your last statement. If you cannot rely on the capacity to be 0 initially, you might restructure your program to allow your vector to have an initial size. This would half the number of heap-memory requests (from 2 to 1). – bitmask Sep 4 '12 at 20:48
  • 4
    @bitmask: Being practical: do you know of any implementation where a vector allocating memory in the default constructor? It is not guaranteed by the standard, but as Mike Seymour points out triggering an allocation without the need would be a bad smell regarding the quality of implementation. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 4 '12 at 20:51
  • 3
    @DavidRodríguez-dribeas: That's not the point. The premise was "you cannot do better than your current strategy, so do not bother wondering if there might be stupid implementations". If the premise was "there are no such implementations, so don't bother" I would buy it. The conclusion happens to be true, but the implication doesn't work. Sorry, maybe I'm nit picking. – bitmask Sep 4 '12 at 20:56
  • 2
    @bitmask If there exists an implementation that allocates memory on default construction, doing what you said would halve the number of allocations. But vector::reserve is not the same as specifying an initial size. The vector constructors that take an initial size value/copy initialize n objects, and thus have linear complexity. OTOH, calling reserve only means copying / moving of size() elements if a reallocation is triggered. On an empty vector there is nothing to copy. So the latter might be desirable even if the implementation allocates memory for a default constructed vector. – Praetorian Sep 4 '12 at 20:56
  • 4
    @bitmask, if you're concerned about the allocations to this degree then you should look at your particular standard library's implementation and not rely on speculation. – Mark Ransom Sep 4 '12 at 21:22
23

Storage implementations of std::vector vary significantly, but all the ones I've come across start from 0.

The following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
  using namespace std;

  vector<int> normal;
  cout << normal.capacity() << endl;

  for (unsigned int loop = 0; loop != 10; ++loop)
  {
      normal.push_back(1);
      cout << normal.capacity() << endl;
  }

  std::cin.get();
  return 0;
}

Gives the following output:

0
1
2
4
4
8
8
8
8
16
16

under GCC 5.1 and:

0
1
2
3
4
6
6
9
9
9
13

under MSVC 2013.

  • 10
    Oh good, they were smart enough to start it at 0. – Andrew Feb 14 '17 at 7:13
  • 2
    This is so underrated @Andrew – Valentin Mercier Apr 14 '17 at 22:58
  • Well you find virtually everywhere that the recommendation for speed purposes is almost always to just use a vector, so if you're doing anything that involves sparse data... – Andrew Apr 15 '17 at 3:40
  • @Andrew what should they have started it at? allocating anything would just be wasting time allocating and deallocating that memory if the programmer wants to reserve more than the default. if you're assuming they should begin with 1, it'll allocate that as soon as somebody is allocating 1 anyway. – Puddle May 13 at 9:54
  • @Puddle You're reading in between the lines instead of taking it at face value. The clue that it's not sarcasm is the word "smart", as well as my second comment mentioning sparse data. – Andrew May 14 at 22:02
6

As far as I understood the standard (though I could actually not name a reference), container instanciation and memory allocation have intentionally been decoupled for good reason. Therefor you have distinct, separate calls for

  • constructor to create the container itself
  • reserve() to pre allocate a suitably large memory block to accomodate at least(!) a given number of objects

And this makes a lot of sense. The only right to exist for reserve() is to give you the opportunity to code around possibly expensive reallocations when growing the vector. In order to be useful you have to know the number of objects to store or at least need to be able to make an educated guess. If this is not given you better stay away from reserve() as you will just change reallocation for wasted memory.

So putting it all together:

  • The standard intentionally does not specify a constructor that allows you to pre allocate a memory block for a specific number of objects (which would be at least more desirable than allocating an implementation specific, fixed "something" under the hood).
  • Allocation shouldn't be implicit. So, to preallocate a block you need to make a separate call to reserve() and this need not be at the same place of construction (could/should of course be later, after you became aware of the required size to accomodate)
  • Thus if a vector would always preallocate a memory block of implementation defined size this would foil the intended job of reserve(), wouldn't it?
  • What would be the advantage of preallocating a block if the STL naturally cannot know the intended purpose and expected size of a vector? It'll be rather nonsensical, if not counter-productive.
  • The proper solution instead is to allocate and implementation specific block with the first push_back() - if not already explicitely allocated before by reserve().
  • In case of a necessary reallocation the increase in block size is implementation specific as well. The vector implementations I know of start with an exponential increase in size but will cap the increment rate at a certain maximum to avoid wasting huge amounts of memory or even blowing it.

All this comes to full operation and advantage only if not disturbed by an allocating constructor. You have reasonable defaults for common scenarios that can be overriden on demand by reserve() (and shrink_to_fit()). So, even if the standard does not explicitely state so, I'm quite sure assuming that a newly constructed vector does not preallocate is a pretty safe bet for all current implementations.

4

As a slight addition to the other answers, I found that when running under debug conditions with Visual Studio a default constructed vector will still allocate on the heap even though the capacity starts at zero.

Specifically if _ITERATOR_DEBUG_LEVEL != 0 then vector will allocate some space to help with iterator checking.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-gb/cpp/standard-library/iterator-debug-level

I just found this slightly annoying since I was using a custom allocator at the time and was not expecting the extra allocation.

2

Standard doesnt specify initial value for capacity but the STL container automatically grows to accomodate as much data as you put in, provided you don't exceed the maximum size(use max_size member function to know). For vector and string, growth is handled by realloc whenever more space is needed. Suppose you'd like to create a vector holding value 1-1000. Without using reserve, the code will typically result in between 2 and 18 reallocations during following loop:

vector<int> v;
for ( int i = 1; i <= 1000; i++) v.push_back(i);

Modifying the code to use reserve might result in 0 allocations during the loop:

vector<int> v;
v.reserve(1000);

for ( int i = 1; i <= 1000; i++) v.push_back(i);

Roughly to say, vector and string capacities grow by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 each time.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.