18

What's a good way to calculate the execution time for every page load using Python's Flask library?

I was thinking of putting a start timer in views/__ init__.py:

@app.before_request
def before_request():
  g.start = time.time()

But where would I put the end part of the timer to calculate the difference, and how would I get it into the footer of my html template?

Thanks.

16

Put it in teardown_request function:

@app.teardown_request
def teardown_request(exception=None):
    diff = time.time() - g.start
    ...

In teardown_request you are not allowed to change the response, If you want to use the calculated string in your response use after_request:

@app.after_request
def after_request(response):
    diff = time.time() - g.start
    if (response.response):
        response.response[0] = response.response[0].replace('__EXECUTION_TIME__', str(diff))
    return response
7
  • How do I get it from there into my template? Isn't that after all the rendering is finished? – ensnare Sep 5 '12 at 3:13
  • 1
    ensnare - Rendering template after calculating the time is not a good idea, because you are ignoring render time this way, but check my update for how to add calculated time to response. – MostafaR Sep 5 '12 at 3:28
  • 1
    I put g.start = time.time() in my before_request() function, and your code in the after_request() function. But when I do that, after_request() can't see g.start. I get the error: '_RequestGlobals' object has no attribute 'start' – ensnare Sep 5 '12 at 13:34
  • Are you sure that you had defined before_request function properly? Add a print statement after g.start = time.time() and check that your code reaches there or not. It's a good idea to update your question with your new source code. – MostafaR Sep 5 '12 at 17:23
  • 1
    Two things: str.replace returns a NEW string, you to do : response.response[0]=response.response[0].replace('__EXECUTION_TIME__', str(diff)) 2. @ensnare, you can add conditions to the diff here, for example: if response.response and response.content_type.startswith("text/html") – gromgull Oct 4 '12 at 10:19
10

The other answers are essentially correct, but quite out of date now.

The following works with Python 3.6 / 3.7 and Flask 1.0.2:

import time
from flask import g

@app.before_request
def before_request():
    g.start = time.time()

@app.after_request
def after_request(response):
    diff = time.time() - g.start
    if ((response.response) and
        (200 <= response.status_code < 300) and
        (response.content_type.startswith('text/html'))):
        response.set_data(response.get_data().replace(
            b'__EXECUTION_TIME__', bytes(str(diff), 'utf-8')))
    return response

By using response.set_data, the content-length will be correctly updated by Flask. Please also note the use of byte strings and the encoding.

2
  • Does this calculate the in-server duration only or also the time it took to reach the client? or is that not possible? – Mojimi May 14 '20 at 18:52
  • 1
    @Mojimi This is server-side processing time only. It's meant to be used for profiling your actual business logic. Timing from the point of view of the client would have to be done on the client side (in fact, most browsers can easily do this for you). – Jordan Dimov May 15 '20 at 14:31
3

You also need to update the content-length header otherwise browsers get upset (and Chrome seems to give unpredictable results).

@app.after_request
def after_request(response):
    diff = time.time() - g.start
    if app.debug:
        print "Exec time: %s" % str(diff)

    if (response.response):
        response.response[0] = response.response[0].replace('__EXECUTION_TIME__', str(diff))
        response.headers["content-length"] = len(response.response[0])

    return response
1

I had "broken pipe error" serving static files with Peter Farmer's answer, and problems with redirection (HTTP 301), so I tuned the provided code, if it helps.

@app.after_request
def after_request(response):
    diff = int((time.time() - g.start) * 1000)  # to get a time in ms

    if (response.response and response.content_type.startswith("text/html") and response.status_code==200):
        response.response[0] = response.response[0].replace('__EXECUTION_TIME__', str(diff))

    return response
0

What about this elapsed attribute here ?

Here is the solution

>>> import requests
>>> r = requests.get('https://google.com')
>>> r.elapsed.total_seconds()
0.216452
>>> r.elapsed.seconds
0
>>> r.elapsed.microseconds
216452
1
  • 1
    This measures elapsed time for the client, and includes the time taken to send the request to the server over the network and to retrieve the response over the network. The intent of the question is more about the time taken to generate the page on the server. – snakecharmerb Mar 31 at 15:13
0

Try out this: https://code-maven.com/flask-display-elapsed-time

import time
from flask import Flask, request, render_template, g
app = Flask(__name__)
 
 
@app.before_request
def before_request():
   g.request_start_time = time.time()
   g.request_time = lambda: "%.5fs" % (time.time() - g.request_start_time)
 
 
@app.route("/")
def main():
    return render_template('main.html')

and template html like:

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Show elapsed time</h1>
 
<hr>
Elapsed time: {{ g.request_time() }}
</body>
</html>

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