30

I have a collection called Products in my MongoDB database, which is represented by the interface IProductPrice in my Java code. The following repository declaration causes Spring Date to look to the collection db.collection: Intelliprice.iProductPrice.

I want it to configure it to look in db.collection: Intelliprice.Products using an external configuration rather than putting an @Collection(..) annotation on IProductPrice. Is this possible? How can I do this?

public interface ProductsRepository extends
    MongoRepository<IProductPrice, String> {
}
0
24

The only way you can currently achieve this is by annotating your domain class with @Document using the collection property to define the name of the collection instances of this class shall be persisted to.

However, there's a JIRA issue open that suggests adding a pluggable naming strategy to configure the ways class, collection and property names are handled in a more global way. Feel free to comment your use case and vote it up.

5
  • 3
    Thanks, I'm aware of the @Document annotation and probably would end up using that. I basically wanted to externalize the config from the actual class. The JIRA issue you linked to is talking about a naming strategy and still suggests using the annotation for custom names.
    – Danish
    Sep 6 '12 at 20:18
  • 1
    The collection attribute supports SpEL so that you can invoke arbitrary methods on other Spring beans to calculate the collection name by e.g using #{#bean.someMethod(T(your.fully.qualified.Type))} if you have registered a component as bean providing a method someMethod(Class<?> type). Dec 30 '14 at 13:20
  • 1
    This doesn't work if you extend your document from parent interface. If this interface is declared in repository signature ReactiveMongoRepository<iProductPrice, String>, then even hardcoded collection name is ignored - @Document(collection = "specific_collection_name"). Collection will be iproductprice
    – Zon
    Oct 20 '21 at 8:04
  • @Zon In that case you need to use set the collection name at base/parent class level using sepl approach. This solution is simple to employ.
    – CᴴᴀZ
    Oct 21 '21 at 14:03
  • I have tried SPEL, but then you will have one collection name for all the descendants. If you call some method or pass arguments to a prototype bean - anyway collection name is set only once when the bean is created. I have even tried setting annotation value dynamically - this hadn't helped either. The only option left - is to rewrite Spring Data repositories to MongoTemplate that allows passing collection name with queries.
    – Zon
    Oct 21 '21 at 19:59
20

using answer from Oliver Gierke above, working on a project where I need to create multiple collections for one entity, I wanted to use the spring repositories and needed to specify the entity to use before using the repository.

I managed to modify the repository collection name on demand using this system, it using SPeL. You can only work on 1 collection at a time though.

Domain object

@Document(collection = "#{personRepository.getCollectionName()}")
public class Person{}

Default Spring Repository:

public interface PersonRepository 
     extends MongoRepository<Person, String>, PersonRepositoryCustom{
}

Custom Repository Interface:

public interface PersonRepositoryCustom {
    String getCollectionName();

    void setCollectionName(String collectionName);
}

implementation:

public class PersonRepositoryImpl implements PersonRepositoryCustom {

    private static String collectionName = "Person";

    @Override
    public String getCollectionName() {
        return collectionName;
    }

    @Override
    public void setCollectionName(String collectionName) {
        this.collectionName = collectionName;
    }
}

To use it:

@Autowired
PersonRepository personRepository;

public void testRetrievePeopleFrom2SeparateCollectionsWithSpringRepo(){
        List<Person> people = new ArrayList<>();
        personRepository.setCollectionName("collectionA");
        people.addAll(personRepository.findAll());
        personDocumentRepository.setCollectionName("collectionB");
        people.addAll(personRepository.findAll());
        Assert.assertEquals(4, people.size());
}

Otherwise if you need to use configuration variables, you could maybe use something like this? source

@Value("#{systemProperties['pop3.port'] ?: 25}") 
14
  • 1
    haven't tested this, and it's not very clean, but +1 just for being creative :)
    – alex
    Mar 10 '16 at 7:44
  • 1
    Seems that you're keeping "context" information within a repository that is potentially auto-wired in various places. My guess that this solution is not thread safe.
    – thanosa75
    May 18 '16 at 12:41
  • @thanosa75 you are right, I was just reusing that solution and thinking that having a repository where you always provide the collection name, would be much much safer: instead of repo.findAll() > repo.findAll("collectionName") . but I don't know how to do that elegantly (rather than recreate a class that reuses a mongo template, and always set the collection name before running the request)
    – Jeremie
    May 19 '16 at 17:08
  • 1
    This is giving cirular dependency error and when i am removing #{notificationRepository.getCollectionName()} from the Person bean its getting resolved
    – Rohitesh
    Mar 14 '17 at 9:46
  • 1
    Found my problem, it was a project issue because I was creating a custom MongoTemplate based on a brand new MongoMappingContext instead of using the provided MongoMappingContext. May 25 '18 at 13:30
7

A little late, but I've found you can set the mongo collection name dynamically in spring-boot accessing the application configuration directly.

@Document(collection = "#{@environment.getProperty('configuration.property.key')}")
public class DomainModel {...}

I suspect you can set any annotation attribute this way.

3

The only comment I can add is that you have to add @ prefix to the bean name:

collection = "#{@beanName.method()}"

for the bean factory to inject the bean:

@Document(collection = "#{@configRepositoryCustom.getCollectionName()}")
public class Config {

}

I struggled to figure it out..

COMPLETE EXAMPLE:

@Document(collection = "#{@configRepositoryCustom.getCollectionName()}")
public class Config implements Serializable {
 @Id
 private String uuid;
 private String profile;
 private String domain;
 private String label;
 private Map<String, Object> data;
 // get/set
}

 public interface ConfigRepositoryCustom {
   String getCollectionName();
   void setCollectionName(String collectionName);
 }

@Component("configRepositoryCustom")
public class ConfigRepositoryCustomImpl implements ConfigRepositoryCustom {
 private static String collectionName = "config";
 @Override
 public String getCollectionName() {
  return collectionName;
 }
 @Override
 public void setCollectionName(String collectionName) {
 this.collectionName = collectionName;
 }
}

@Repository("configurations")
public interface ConfigurationRepository extends MongoRepository<Config, String>, ConfigRepositoryCustom {
  public Optional<Config> findOneByUuid(String Uuid);
  public Optional<Config> findOneByProfileAndDomain(String profile, String domain);
}

usage in serviceImpl:

@Service
public class ConfigrationServiceImpl implements ConfigrationService {
 @Autowired
 private ConfigRepositoryCustom configRepositoryCustom;

 @Override
 public Config create(Config configuration) {
   configRepositoryCustom.setCollectionName( configuration.getDomain() ); // set the collection name that comes in my example in class member 'domain'
   Config configDB = configurationRepository.save(configuration);
   return configDB;
}
3
  • 1
    I also only manage to get this work with the '@' bean prefix. Not sure about that syntax as it is also not suggested in @Oliver Drotbohm|s mentioned Jira Issue where the solution is otherwise also documented.
    – FrVaBe
    Mar 26 '20 at 10:17
  • The usage of the '@' prefix for bean references is documented here. Thanks Mark for the hint.
    – FrVaBe
    Mar 26 '20 at 12:27
  • For some reason, this works for me but ONLY if the first letter of the bean name is lower case. So instead of #{@ActualBeanName.method()}", it works only if I use #{@actualBeanName.method()}"
    – iamfrank
    Oct 28 '21 at 21:11
1

I use static class and method in SpEL;

public class CollectionNameHolder {
    private static final ThreadLocal<String> collectionNameThreadLocal = new ThreadLocal<>();

    public static String get(){
        String collectionName = collectionNameThreadLocal.get();
        if(collectionName == null){
            collectionName = DataCenterApiConstant.APP_WECHAT_DOCTOR_PATIENT_COLLECTION_NAME;
            collectionNameThreadLocal.set(collectionName);
        }
        return collectionName;
    }

    public static void set(String collectionName){
        collectionNameThreadLocal.set(collectionName);
    }

    public static void reset(){
        collectionNameThreadLocal.remove();
    }
}

In Entity class ,@Document(collection = "#{T(com.test.data.CollectionNameHolder).get()}")

And then ,use

CollectionNameHolder.set("testx_"+pageNum) 

in Service , and

CollectionNameHolder.reset();

Hope it helps you.

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