13

How can I determine if one array is a subset of another (all elements in the first are present in the second)?

 $s1 = "string1>string2>string3>string4>string5>string6>";
 $arr1 = explode(">", $s1);
 $s2 = "string1>string4>string5";
 $arr2 = explode(">", $s2);

 $isSubset = /* ??? */
17

If you start from strings, you could check strstr($fullString,$subsetStr);. But that'll only work when all chars have the same order: 'abcd','cd' will work, but 'abcd','ad' won't.

But instead of writing your own, custom, function you should know that PHP has TONS of array functions, so its neigh on impossible that there isn't a std function that can do what you need it to do. In this case, I'd suggest array_diff:

$srcString = explode('>','string1>string2>string3>string4>string5');
$subset = explode('>','string3>string2>string5');
$isSubset = array_diff($subset,$srcString);
//if (empty($isSubset)) --> cf comments: somewhat safer branch:
if (!$isSubset)
{
    echo 'Subset';
    return true;
}
else
{
    echo 'Nope, substrings: '.implode(', ',$isSubset).' Didn\'t match';
    return false;
}
  • 1
    Please see The Definitive Guide To PHP's isset And empty for why not. – deceze Sep 5 '12 at 7:59
  • 3
    Thanks, but as it says: there's no real difference here: empty === loose comparison to false, so empty($var) and !$var are interchangeable. The only benefit AFAIK, is that !$var throws errors when $var is undefined. This isn't possible in the snippet above. I'll edit my answer, though, just in case someone, for whatever reason, decides to add numerous lines of code between the array_diff and if() – Elias Van Ootegem Sep 5 '12 at 8:07
  • 2
    Well, exactly. You should use empty only for variables which may legitimately not exist. Otherwise you're unnecessarily foregoing the advantages of PHP's error reporting. It's just a rule of thumb you should follow to make your own life easier by not suppressing error reporting. – deceze Sep 5 '12 at 8:09
  • 3
    I don't mind being down-voted, but I do mind that people don't bother to explain why – Elias Van Ootegem Dec 19 '13 at 7:21
  • 1
    $isSubset should be named $isntSubset, no? – Dan Chadwick Aug 29 '18 at 14:00
54
if (array_intersect($array1, $array2) == $array1) {
    // $array1 is a subset of $array2
}
  • 1
    array_intersect :) , nice solution – shail Sep 5 '12 at 7:48
  • Yours is actually better though. :) – deceze Sep 5 '12 at 7:50
  • 2
    @Tamas Well, no, array_diff is actually a lot more elegant. :) – deceze Aug 5 '13 at 12:20
  • array_diff(['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b']) will return ['c']. However array_diff(['c'], ['d']) will also return ['c'] so it's not as elegant a solution actually. – aleemb Jun 22 '15 at 0:40
  • 1
    @aleemb Well... if array_diff results in anything but an empty array, the array is not a subset of the other. If the result is an empty array it's a subset. So, the results in your example are expected and correct and exactly what we want. – deceze Jun 22 '15 at 7:17
17

Simple: use array subtraction.

On array subtraction, you will know whether or not one array is a subset of the other.

Example:

if (!array_diff($array1, $array2)) {
    // $array1 is a subset of $array2
}

Reference: array_diff

You can use array_intersect also.

  • array_diff(['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b']) will return ['c']. However array_diff(['c'], ['d']) will also return ['c'] so it's not as elegant a solution actually. – aleemb Jun 22 '15 at 0:40
  • array_diff_assoc is safer when comparing multi-dimensional arrays if you have specific types for each key in the array – Tez Dec 6 '17 at 23:14
  • 2
    @aleemb I don't see your point. For this solution: array_diff(['a', 'b','c'], ['a', 'b']) returns ['c'], which means array1 is not subset of array2 --> correct. array_diff(['c'], ['d']) returns ['c'], which means array1 is not subset of array2 --> correct. What is wrong? – alumi Jul 12 '18 at 15:06
  • I think a problem is that this solution is hard to think about. array_intersect solution has no negation and does not involve mathematics. It's easy to mentally visualize. – datashaman Dec 11 '19 at 15:37
1

I would create an associated array of the larger array, then iterate through the smaller array, looking for a non collision, if you find one, return false.

function isSubset($arr1,$arr2){
    $map = Array();
    for ($i=0;$i<count($arr1);$i++){
      $map[$arr[$i]]=true;
    }
    for ($i=0;$i<count($arr2);$i++){
       if (!isset($map[$arr2[$i]])){
          return false;
       }
    }
    return true;
  • 4
    That's the most complicated array_flip I've ever seen. – deceze Sep 5 '12 at 7:42
  • It's actually the most simple way you could do an array_flip. It is almost certainly what happens behind the scenes of array_flip. But thanks for telling me about that function. Good to know. – ajon Sep 5 '12 at 21:10
1
$s1 = "1>2>3>4>5>6>7";

$arr1 = explode(">",$s1);

$s2 = "1>2>3";

$arr2 = explode(">",$s2); 

if(isSub($arr1,$arr2)){

         echo 'true';

}else{

         echo 'false';
}

function isSub($a1,$a2){

    $num2 = count($a2);
    $sub  = $num2;

    for($i = 0;$i < $num2 ;$i++){
        if(in_array($a2[$i],$a1)){
            $sub--;
        }
    }
    return ($sub==0)? true:false;
}
0

Simple function which will return true if array is exact subset otherwise false. Solution is applicable for two dimensional array as well.

 function is_array_subset($superArr, $subArr) {
        foreach ($subArr as $key => $value) {
            //check if keys not set in super array OR values are unequal in both array.
            if (!isset($superArr[$key]) || $superArr[$key] != $value) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

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