5

I'm relatively new to the C# language however with a lot of help from Google searches and Stack Overflow I've done a number of apps already which include working with Office, System Services, Processes, WMI, SQL, Linq and Active Directory...

Though despite having success with getting these apps functional I am still unsure about many things in the C# language such as good code practise and using many of the keywords etc..

C# Classes; I know what I can do with them, I know about Constructors and Destructors, Instantiation and Properties but I'm unsure of when I should be using them. So far I have written all of my code in my Form1.cs file inside different Methods. These Methods do a range of different things with completely different APIs. This obviously means that trying to maintain that code can become quite difficult and I'm finding it increasingly frustrating to find anything inside my Form1.cs.

My question to you guys is should I be splitting my code up into different classes? I've attempted to split stuff related to SqlConnection and SqlCommands into a separate class but without instantiating that same class multiple times in my Form1.cs I can't see this being any easier or any benefit.

I've been trying to piece a new app together but this time keeping functionality in it's own class, I was hoping somebody could either tell me I'm stupid and doing it wrong or at least give me some guidance.

This app will eventually load my connection string from App.Config, connect to a SQL database and populate a DataSet with multiple tables from the database. This is by no means functional as it stands as I can't get my head around the whole Classes issue.

partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    string myConnectionString;

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {
        AppConfig cfg = new AppConfig();
        if (cfg.loadConfig())
        {
            myConnectionString = cfg.myConnectionString();
        }
        
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(myConnectionString))
        {
            SQLConn SQL = new SQLConn();
            if (SQL.createConnection(myConnectionString))
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Connected!");
            }
        }
    }
}

class myDataSet
{
    DataSet DataSet()
    {
        DataSet ds = new DataSet();

        SQLConn sql = new SQLConn();
        
        return ds;
    }

    public void fillData()
    {
        try
        {
            SqlCommand sqlCmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM hardware");                
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

class SQLConn : IDisposable
{
    SqlConnection sqlConn;
    public bool createConnection(string myConnectionString)
    {
        sqlConn = new SqlConnection();
        sqlConn.ConnectionString = myConnectionString;
        try
        {
            sqlConn.Open();
            return true;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
        return false;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (sqlConn.State == ConnectionState.Open)
        {
            sqlConn.Close();
            sqlConn.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

class AppConfig
{
    Configuration cfg;

    public bool loadConfig()
    {
        try
        {
            cfg = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(ConfigurationUserLevel.None);
            if (!File.Exists(cfg.FilePath))
            {
                MessageBox.Show("No configuration file");
            }
            return true;
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
        return false;
    }

    public string myConnectionString()
    {
        string connectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["IT_ProjectConnectionString"].ConnectionString;
        return connectionString;
    }
}
6
8

The principles behind OOP say more or less that you should split stuff up as much as possible so that related things are grouped together in their own class, like the SQL stuff in your example. Another, often used example is that of a car - if you need to deal with the data of cars, you would make a car class containing relevant variables like top speed, name, colour and appropriate methods like for example drive(double distance) or something like that.

If you don't want different objects of that class and need that same behaviour at several points, you can prevent multiple instances in several ways: if all points are in your Form1, you only need to instantiate your class once as a class member and you can use it throughout the Form1 class. If you need to access it from different classes, you can either have a global variable (which is considered bad practice by most) or make the class you need to access static - that way, you don't need to instantiate it at all.

If your app is really small, you might get away with putting it all in your Form1 class, but as you yourself noticed, it can get messy and confusing very quickly. Think of classes as an opportunity to sort your code. Think of what is connected with what, and what you would expect to find together, and put that stuff in classes. If you adhere to that, you end up with code that's less frustrating to find code in and that has a clear and logical structure. You can take advantage of things like inheritance once things get more complex and you can reuse classes that do stuff (again, database stuff for example) that you might need in different applications.

This is a very short and very rough description. I don't know any good books on the topic myself (except ones which are for total programming beginners, which seems inappropriate here), but I suggest to find one on OOP or searching for good introduction articles to that topic. Personally, I find the CodeProject to be a good source of articles. Here is one on OOP.

2
  • Thanks, I think you pretty much hit the nail on the head and it was the kind of guideance I was looking for. You've also shown me how I can actually make use of the keyword static as I was unaware that static classes don't need to be instantiated, great! I think I've had the right idea and I've wanted to to use classes to divide functionality out of my Form1 class but I wasn't sure if I was going about it the right way. Thanks again :)
    – Robula
    Sep 5 '12 at 10:02
  • Great I could help you. I was afraid that my answer was too convoluted - I have a habit of explaining things in a really weird way that seems to make sense to noone but me :)
    – Christian
    Sep 5 '12 at 10:07
4

I use the Single Responsibility Principle as a guide to designing classes. Here is a good discussion of this, with the salient point being:

The point is that each class should implement a cohesive set of related functions. An easy way to follow the Single Responsibility Principle is to constantly ask yourself whether every method and operation of a class is directly related to the name of that class. If you find some methods that do not fit with the name of the class, you should consider moving those methods to another class.

With that in mind, I think you are right to split the functionality of your sample application into separate classes. Otherwise you'll end up with a conglomerate Form1 class which possesses multiple responsibilities: reading config values, connecting to databases, reading data. As you observe, splitting the code into separate classes also makes the program easier to understand and navigate.

1
  • Thanks Phillip, I think this is the kind of information I need. Reading through it now. :)
    – Robula
    Sep 5 '12 at 9:22
0

Think about your classes encapsulating some kind of functionality. In your case SQLConn is handling connections to the database, that means this class owns the database connection, and all traffic should now go through this class. That also means that your myDataSet class should make use of your SQLConn class for all communications, thus it is a mistake that you instantiate a SqlCommand inside it.

I think you may be confusing instances with classes in your implementation. You are creating multiple instances of the class SQLConn, first on your OnLoad method where you connect to the database, later inside your myDataSet class. This is not the same instace of the class. Thus your myDataSet class will be using a SQLConn that has not connected to the database.

You can instead share the same instance by providing the myDataSet class with the SQLConn instance you want it to work on:

public myDataSet(SQLConn conn) 
{ 
    SQLConn sql = conn;
} 

{
    SQLConn conn = new SQLConn();
    conn.createConnection(...);
    myDataSet ds = new myDataSet(conn);
}

This is still not good design, but it illustrates how to pass on an instance vs. referencing a class directly.

1
  • Thanks Simon, by all means I wish to avoid bad design and practise. Previously I used to pass my Form1 Class to other Classes in order to access my Form1 data directly from the other class which I recently learnt is bad. Thanks for clearing up my understanding of instances also.
    – Robula
    Sep 5 '12 at 10:08

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