I'm trying to learn move semantics well enough to introduce it to my students. I've been using highly simplified vector- or string-like classes that manage memory and whose members output messages to demonstrate their activity. I'm trying to develop a simple set of examples to show students.

Construction elision for RVO and elsewhere in gcc 4.7 and clang aggressively eliminates copy and move construction, so while I can easily see move assignment at work, the only time I've seen move construction at work is if I turn off construction elision in gcc 4.7 with -fno-elide-constructors.

An explicit copy construction statement

MyString newString(oldString);

will invoke the copy constructor even if elision is enabled. But something like

MyString newString(oldString1 + oldString2); 

doesn't invoke the move constructor because of the elision.

Anything explicitly using std::move won't make a simple example because explaining std::move has to come later.

So my question: Is there a simple code example that will invoke move construction even if copy/move constructors are being elided?

  • I'm not certain it can be done without std::move... – Mooing Duck Sep 5 '12 at 16:39
  • 1
    "Anything explicitly using std::move won't make a simple example because explaining std::move has to come later." Um, why? std::move is how you move things explicitly. Move support is primarily about explicit moves, since most implicit moves can be caught with elision. You're doing anyone who's learning from this a disservice by hiding move from them. – Nicol Bolas Sep 5 '12 at 16:47
  • @NicolBolas: because there are implicit moves, at least in theory. Think of OP asking for an intermediate level of optimization: oldString1+oldString2 triggers a copy (no optimization here), but the copy is moved into newString (optimization). In practice, this is hard to trigger because the compiler chooses the "copy elision" optimization over the "move the copy" optimization (with good reason). – André Caron Sep 5 '12 at 16:56
  • I will have to explain std::move, but it would help if I could demonstrate move construction without having to first introduce std::move (whose explanation is a tad tricky). – user1628444 Sep 5 '12 at 17:10
  • @NicolBolas - sorry, I should have prefixed my comment above to show my comment was in response to yours. – user1628444 Sep 5 '12 at 20:15
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The simple example would be an argument to a function that is returned. The standard explicitly forbids eliding the move in this case (not that they could...):

std::vector<int> multiply( std::vector<int> input, int value ) {
   for (auto& i : input )
      i *= value;
   return input;
}

Additionally, you can explicitly request move construction for an even simpler although a bit more artificial example:

T a;
T b( std::move(a) );

Uhm... yet another that does not involve std::move (it can technically be elided, but most compilers will probably not):

std::vector<int> create( bool large ) {
   std::vector<int> v1 = f();
   std::vector<int> v2 = v1;       // modify both v1 and v2 somehow
   v2.resize( v2.size()/2 );
   if ( large ) {
      return v1;
   } else {
      return v2;
   }
}

While the optimizer can elide it by rewriting the code as:

std::vector<int> create( bool large ) {
   if ( large ) {
      std::vector<int> v1 = f();
      std::vector<int> v2 = v1;       // modify both v1 and v2 somehow
      v2.resize( v2.size()/2 );
      return v1;
   } else {
      std::vector<int> v1 = f();
      std::vector<int> v2 = v1;       // modify both v1 and v2 somehow
      v2.resize( v2.size()/2 );
      return v2;
   }
}

I pretty much doubt that the compiler will actually do it. Note that in each code path the object being returned in known before v1 and v2 are created, so the optimizer can locate the proper object in the return location after the rewrite.

The situations where copy/move can be elided are described in 12.8/31. If you manage to write code that does not fall into those categories and the type has a move constructor, the move constructor will be called.

  • Is this limitation in place because otherwise, implementations could attempt to elide both the argument and the return value? – André Caron Sep 5 '12 at 16:34
  • 1
    @AndréCaron: Copy elision works by reusing the same memory for both the source and the destination objects. For example in T a = f(); the compiler can locate the a object in the same location that the returned value from f(). The problem is that the calling convention usually determines the location of both the argument and the returned object, so the compiler cannot force them to be in the same place. More on copy elision here and here – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 5 '12 at 16:37
  • Yes, the argument and the return value could be in the same place (at least in some cases). Think of int f(int x){return x;} and aggressive inlining. In the example you presented, you can't elide both the argument copy construction and the return value because you need to construct at least one new object to hold the function's results. My question is why is this a general limitation? – André Caron Sep 5 '12 at 16:47
  • Hmmm, maybe I'm confused. Now that I look at your example again, I can't imagine why can't the input argument be the return value itself (other than for practical compiler implementations). Why does the standard forbid it? – André Caron Sep 5 '12 at 16:49
  • @AndréCaron: Because the standard says so. Because there has to be at least one copy, since the function is taking a parameter by value and returning a value by value. So either a copy constructor or a move constructor must be called. – Nicol Bolas Sep 5 '12 at 16:49

Hmmm, let's see:

  • MyString newString(oldString) is a copy. There's nothing to elide here; we really end up with two objects.

  • MyString newString(oldString1 + oldString2); copies from a temporary, so the copy can be elided and the concatenation is constructed directly in-place.

Here's a really terribly cheap example of un-elidable move construction:

MyString boo()
{
    MyString s("Hello");
    return std::move(s);   // move-construction from the local "s", never elided
}

The explicit cast makes s ineligible for RVO, so the return value will be move-constructed from s.

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