180

Is it possible to control UIView border properties (color, thickness, etc...) directly from interface builder or I can only do it programmatically?

10 Answers 10

388

Actually you can set some properties of a view's layer through interface builder. I know that I can set a layer's borderWidth and cornerRadius through xcode. borderColor doesn't work, probably because the layer wants a CGColor instead of a UIColor.

You might have to use Strings instead of numbers, but it works!

layer.cornerRadius
layer.borderWidth
layer.borderColor

Update: layer.masksToBounds = true

example

Update: select appropriate Type for Keypath:

enter image description here

  • 3
    To you and Peter DeWeese: I use Xcode 4.6.3 and I can set keypath type to "Color" without impleting a CALayer interface – user2761503 Sep 9 '13 at 13:06
  • 36
    Unfortunately layer.borderColor can't be set this way. It's a CGColorRef, but that IB Color value type is a UIColor. – mrgrieves Feb 10 '14 at 22:33
  • 12
    So THIS is what the user defined runtime attributes does! Haha, been writing for iOS since 2011 and I never learned what those fields were for. Thanks for this awesome answer. – Andy Ibanez Sep 22 '14 at 19:31
  • 3
    Nice, but you have to set the correct type for each property. The Type for e. g. "layer.cornerRadius" has to be set to "Number" instead of "String"! – Peter Kreinz Aug 15 '15 at 18:54
  • 5
    Also, don't forget to check the "clip to bounds" checkbox to have the cornerRadius working. – Pierre-Olivier Simonard Aug 8 '18 at 15:08
180

Rich86Man's answer is correct, but you can use categories to proxy properties such as layer.borderColor. (From the ConventionalC CocoaPod)

CALayer+XibConfiguration.h:

#import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h>
#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface CALayer(XibConfiguration)

// This assigns a CGColor to borderColor.
@property(nonatomic, assign) UIColor* borderUIColor;

@end

CALayer+XibConfiguration.m:

#import "CALayer+XibConfiguration.h"

@implementation CALayer(XibConfiguration)

-(void)setBorderUIColor:(UIColor*)color
{
    self.borderColor = color.CGColor;
}

-(UIColor*)borderUIColor
{
    return [UIColor colorWithCGColor:self.borderColor];
}

@end

Interface Builder

layer.borderUIColor

The result will be apparent during runtime, not in Xcode.

Edit: You also need to set layer.borderWidth to at least 1 to see the border with the chosen color.

In Swift 2.0:

extension CALayer {
    var borderUIColor: UIColor {
        set {
            self.borderColor = newValue.CGColor
        }

        get {
            return UIColor(CGColor: self.borderColor!)
        }
    }
}

In Swift 3.0:

extension CALayer {
    var borderUIColor: UIColor {
        set {
            self.borderColor = newValue.cgColor
        }

        get {
            return UIColor(cgColor: self.borderColor!)
        }
    }
}
  • I can't get this to work for me. The .m file moans about borderColor having to be borderUIColor and to fix it, after doing so it still shows warnings and the border color doesnt render at runtime. The bit that is different on mine is I have @ implementation NameOfFile, not @ implementation CALayer(NameOfFile), I dont understand the CALayer part, could you explain that more please – Dave Haigh Sep 5 '13 at 8:22
  • 2
    @PeterDeWeese great answer!=) – c-villain Sep 4 '14 at 22:07
  • 1
    You actually can use Number with borderWidth and accept an NSNumber. It works fine. – Peter DeWeese Oct 19 '14 at 17:18
  • 1
    This is definitely the best solution in my opinion to solve the issue of BorderColor. Fantastic use of categories! – EricWasTaken Jul 4 '15 at 20:15
  • 1
    Worked in Swift ! – KOTIOS Dec 8 '16 at 11:17
79

Similar answer to iHulk's one, but in Swift

Add a file named UIView.swift in your project (or just paste this in any file) :

import UIKit

@IBDesignable extension UIView {
    @IBInspectable var borderColor: UIColor? {
        set {
            layer.borderColor = newValue?.cgColor
        }
        get {
            guard let color = layer.borderColor else {
                return nil
            }
            return UIColor(cgColor: color)
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var borderWidth: CGFloat {
        set {
            layer.borderWidth = newValue
        }
        get {
            return layer.borderWidth
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var cornerRadius: CGFloat {
        set {
            layer.cornerRadius = newValue
            clipsToBounds = newValue > 0
        }
        get {
            return layer.cornerRadius
        }
    }
}

Then this will be available in Interface Builder for every button, imageView, label, etc. in the Utilities Panel > Attributes Inspector :

Attributes Inspector

Note: the border will only appear at runtime.

  • @Gaurav What error do you see ? On which component (UIButton, UILabel, etc.) are you using it ? – Axel Guilmin Apr 17 '16 at 16:12
  • 2
    I was getting Interface Builder crashes with this approach until I removed @IBDesignable from the beginning of the extension. – Albert Bori May 19 '16 at 1:39
  • 1
    That is amazing... Thanks! I'm using XCode 8.2.1 – bobwki Mar 13 '17 at 0:34
  • 1
    Very handy and neat! Thanks! – Karl-John Chow May 2 '17 at 2:42
  • 1
    Amazing, it works, thanks for sharing. – CristianMoisei Mar 9 '19 at 22:52
56

You can make a category of UIView and add this in .h file of category

@property (nonatomic) IBInspectable UIColor *borderColor;
@property (nonatomic) IBInspectable CGFloat borderWidth;
@property (nonatomic) IBInspectable CGFloat cornerRadius;

Now add this in .m file

@dynamic borderColor,borderWidth,cornerRadius;

and this as well in . m file

-(void)setBorderColor:(UIColor *)borderColor{
    [self.layer setBorderColor:borderColor.CGColor];
}

-(void)setBorderWidth:(CGFloat)borderWidth{
    [self.layer setBorderWidth:borderWidth];
}

-(void)setCornerRadius:(CGFloat)cornerRadius{
    [self.layer setCornerRadius:cornerRadius];
}

now you will see this in your storyboard for all UIView subclasses (UILabel, UITextField, UIImageView etc)

enter image description here

Thats it.. No Need to import category anywhere, just add the category's files in the project and see these properties in the storyboard.

  • 2
    Complement it with IB_DESIGNABLE to make IB redraw your custom view using the drawRect: method developer.apple.com/library/ios/recipes/… – txulu Aug 25 '15 at 15:56
  • 3
    Thats great, If you write IB_DESIGNABLE in the .h file before the interface line, you dont need to add @dynamic line in .m – Jasmeet May 16 '16 at 21:49
  • @user1618612 it has nothing to do with the resolution, it is just setting normal layer properties. – iHulk Dec 9 '16 at 6:43
10

For Swift 3 and 4, if you're willing to use IBInspectables, there's this:

@IBDesignable extension UIView {
    @IBInspectable var borderColor:UIColor? {
        set {
            layer.borderColor = newValue!.cgColor
        }
        get {
            if let color = layer.borderColor {
                return UIColor(cgColor: color)
            }
            else {
                return nil
            }
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var borderWidth:CGFloat {
        set {
            layer.borderWidth = newValue
        }
        get {
            return layer.borderWidth
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var cornerRadius:CGFloat {
        set {
            layer.cornerRadius = newValue
            clipsToBounds = newValue > 0
        }
        get {
            return layer.cornerRadius
        }
    }
}
  • This is a best solution for me – Mục Đồng May 22 '18 at 3:51
  • Great Solution , Thank u – Ebtehal___ Feb 25 '19 at 11:03
7

while this might set the properties, it doesnt actually reflect in IB. So if you're essentially writing code in IB, you might as well then do it in your source code

  • 1
    Welcome to MVC! You view properties should never be in code! – Alejandro Iván Jun 30 '16 at 15:02
  • 1
    ^ This is not what MVC is. – Andrew Plummer Feb 28 '17 at 22:09
  • 1
    Considering that 95% of the time this code goes in the controller, it is also MVC, of course should you properly subclass or extend your view then its just configuration over coding :-) – Daniele Bernardini Sep 30 '17 at 15:27
4

If you want to save time, just use two UIViews on top of each other, the one at the back being the border color, and the one in front smaller, giving the bordered effect. I don't think this is an elegant solution either, but if Apple cared a little more then you shouldn't have to do this.

  • 10
    Workarounds save time now and waste much more time in future. – Lachezar Todorov Mar 17 '15 at 9:41
0

Its absolutely possible only when you set layer.masksToBounds = true and do you rest stuff.

-1

Storyboard doesn't work for me all the time even after trying all the solution here

So it is always perfect answer is using the code, Just create IBOutlet instance of the UIView and add the properties

Short answer :

layer.cornerRadius = 10
layer.borderWidth = 1
layer.borderColor = UIColor.blue.cgColor

Long answer :

Rounded Corners of UIView/UIButton etc

customUIView.layer.cornerRadius = 10

Border Thickness

pcustomUIView.layer.borderWidth = 2

Border Color

customUIView.layer.borderColor = UIColor.blue.cgColor
  • The question is very specific and ask how to do it from the Interface Builder. Your answer is irrelevant. – Shinnyx Oct 24 '19 at 19:03
-5

Please add these 2 simple line of code:

self.YourViewName.layer.cornerRadius = 15
self.YourViewName.layer.masksToBounds = true

It will work fine.

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