14

I need to step through a .gif image and determine the RGB value of each pixel, x and y coordinates. Can someone give me an overview of how I can accomplish this? (methodology, which namespaces to use, etc.)

26

This is a complete example with both methods, using LockBits() and GetPixel(). Besides the trust issues with LockBits() things can easily get hairy.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Drawing;

namespace BitmapReader
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            //Try a small pic to be able to compare output, 
            //a big one to compare performance
            System.Drawing.Bitmap b = new 
                System.Drawing.Bitmap(@"C:\Users\vinko\Pictures\Dibujo2.jpg"); 
            doSomethingWithBitmapSlow(b);
            doSomethingWithBitmapFast(b);
        }

        public static void doSomethingWithBitmapSlow(System.Drawing.Bitmap bmp)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < bmp.Width; x++)
            {
                for (int y = 0; y < bmp.Height; y++)
                {
                    Color clr = bmp.GetPixel(x, y);
                    int red = clr.R;
                    int green = clr.G;
                    int blue = clr.B;
                    Console.WriteLine("Slow: " + red + " " 
                                       + green + " " + blue);
                }
            }
        }

        public static void doSomethingWithBitmapFast(System.Drawing.Bitmap bmp)
        {
            Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(0, 0, bmp.Width, bmp.Height);

            System.Drawing.Imaging.BitmapData bmpData =
                bmp.LockBits(rect, 
                    System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageLockMode.ReadOnly,
                    bmp.PixelFormat);

            IntPtr ptr = bmpData.Scan0;

            int bytes = bmpData.Stride * bmp.Height;
            byte[] rgbValues = new byte[bytes];

            System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.Copy(ptr, 
                           rgbValues, 0, bytes);

            byte red = 0;
            byte green = 0;
            byte blue = 0;

            for (int x = 0; x < bmp.Width; x++)
            {
                for (int y = 0; y < bmp.Height; y++)
                {
                    //See the link above for an explanation 
                    //of this calculation
                    int position = (y * bmpData.Stride) + (x * Image.GetPixelFormatSize(bmpData.PixelFormat)/8); 
                    blue = rgbValues[position];
                    green = rgbValues[position + 1];
                    red = rgbValues[position + 2];
                    Console.WriteLine("Fast: " + red + " " 
                                       + green + " " + blue);
                }
            }
            bmp.UnlockBits(bmpData);
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    I have never been able to implement any type of image processing using Get/SetPixel. It is always way too slow, even for trivial operations like increases overall brightness. – Ed S. Aug 4 '09 at 23:37
  • 1
    It's always too slow when your images are big. For icon sized images it's perfectly suitable :-) – Vinko Vrsalovic Aug 5 '09 at 0:01
  • Oh, well, yeah :-) – Ed S. Aug 5 '09 at 20:29
  • Hi, is there a way to modify this so that it doesn't need to assume 24bppRgb format, but rather modify the formula based on bmp.PixelFormat – hofnarwillie Sep 5 '13 at 16:44
  • 2
    @hofnarwillie You can replace the hardcoded 3 in int position = (y * bmpData.Stride) + (x * 3); by Image.GetPixelFormatSize(bmpData.PixelFormat)/8. – heltonbiker Sep 12 '13 at 15:26
9

You can load the image using new Bitmap(filename) and then use Bitmap.GetPixel repeatedly. This is very slow but simple. (See Vinko's answer for an example.)

If performance is important, you might want to use Bitmap.LockBits and unsafe code. Obviously this reduces the number of places you'd be able to use the solution (in terms of trust levels) and is generally more complex - but it can be a lot faster.

  • Wow. I was looking for this a few weeks ago. Definitely will look more into the example. Thank you for the link. – maxwellb Aug 4 '09 at 22:51
  • It is quite a lot more complex (and quite a lot faster indeed), you have to take into consideration the PixelFormat of the image, check if the data is or is not padded and skip some values accordingly. The MSDN example is not particularly helpful as it doesn't mention any of this. – Vinko Vrsalovic Aug 4 '09 at 23:10
0

If your gif isn't animated use this:

Image img = Image.FromFile("image.gif");

for (int x = 0; x < img.Width; x++)
{
    for (int y = 0; y < img.Height; y++)
    {
        // Do stuff here
    }
}

(Untested)


Otherwise use this to loop through all the frames, as well:

Image img = Image.FromFile("animation.gif");

FrameDimension frameDimension = new FrameDimension(img.FrameDimensionsList[0]);
int frames = img.GetFrameCount(frameDimension);

for (int f = 0; f < frames; f++)
{
    img.SelectActiveFrame(frameDimension, f);

    for (int x = 0; x < img.Width; x++)
    {
        for (int y = 0; y < img.Height; y++)
        {
            // Do stuff here
        }
    }
}

(Untested)

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