Given an array [1, 2, 3, 4], how can I find the sum of its elements? (In this case, the sum would be 10.)

I thought $.each might be useful, but I'm not sure how to implement it.

  • 7
    Amir, any chance you could change the accepted answer? Community voting is pretty overwhelming in favour of a different one. – Pekka 웃 Jan 7 '16 at 9:43
  • 5
    amir, please consider accepting @FlorianMargaine 's answer rather than the much-less-efficient one you chose. – einpoklum Jan 7 '16 at 10:23
  • 4
    This question is under meta discussion – Madara Uchiha Jan 7 '16 at 10:24
  • 10
    @tereško Unwillingness to google is not a valid close reason on Stackoverflow. Please downvote if you feel that the question is not well (re)searched. (Also judging by the answers - this seems to be a highly controversial topic with many possible solutions including some highly upvoted bad practises (eval) - surprisingly.) – Trilarion Jan 7 '16 at 10:26
  • 5
    Note: most answers here essentially compute a[0] + a[1] + ..., which can turn into string concatenation if the array has non-number elements. E.g. ['foo', 42].reduce((a,b)=>a+b, 0) === "0foo42". – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 10 '16 at 17:00

36 Answers 36

up vote 935 down vote accepted

In Lisp, this'd be exactly the job for reduce. You'd see this kind of code:

(reduce #'+ '(1 2 3)) ; 6

Fortunately, in JavaScript, we also have reduce! Unfortunately, + is an operator, not a function. But we can make it pretty! Here, look:

var sum = [1, 2, 3].reduce(add, 0);

function add(a, b) {
    return a + b;
}

console.log(sum); // 6

Isn't that pretty? :-)

Even better! If you're using ECMAScript 2015 (aka ECMAScript 6), it can be this pretty:

var sum = [1, 2, 3].reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0);
console.log(sum); // 6
  • 73
    Yes, no IE8 support, jQuery 2+ doesn't work in IE8 either. Let's not be hamstrung by a really crappy browser. This Answer is beautiful. Thank Florian. – augurone Jun 13 '14 at 1:22
  • 15
    Assuming we all use ES2015, we can make it less verbose : [1, 2, 3].reduce((a,b)=>a+b) – Denys Séguret Apr 29 '15 at 15:35
  • 13
    "If the array is empty and no initialValue was provided, TypeError would be thrown" — so it's safer to write [1, 2, 3].reduce((a,b) => a+b, 0) – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 5 '16 at 13:42
  • 3
    @AlexCohn See Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin's comment about empty arrays. – user743382 Jan 9 '16 at 21:35
  • 5
    Correctness purposes. I see now the OP's question technically is about a fixed array [1, 2, 3, 4] but I assume that's just an example; the interesting question is "how do I sum any array of numbers, that I got from unrelated source e.g. as parameter to my function". Empty arrays can easily appear from user input, searches, filtering etc. and most of the time don't need special casing — the sum of [] is a perfectly well-defined question, whose answer is 0. Even when you know a particular array can't be empty, saving the 3 characters , 0 is not worth the potential future bug... – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 10 '16 at 12:10

Why not reduce? It's usually a bit counter intuitive, but using it to find a sum is pretty straightforward:

var a = [1,2,3];
var sum = a.reduce(function(a, b) { return a + b; }, 0);
  • 3
    IE8 doesn't support it, and it doesn't look like jQuery intends on adding it. However, Prototype has it. – Ishmael Smyrnow Apr 10 '12 at 20:33
  • 4
    @Ishmael, you can use UnderscoreJS, which falls back to the browser's implementation if available, or implements its own otherwise. – Pablo Diaz Mar 13 '13 at 23:09
  • 3
    What's counter-intuitive about reduce()? – canon Jan 7 '16 at 14:48
  • 3
    @s4nji Array.prototype.reduce() reduces an array to a single return value. – canon Jan 26 '16 at 16:56
  • 5
    @s4nji ...unless you are reducing a sauce - in which case you are boling it down to its essentials, i.e. the sum of all flavors without the water overhead. :-) – CB Du Rietz Apr 24 '16 at 12:05

Recommended (reduce with default value)

Array.prototype.reduce can be used to iterate through the array, adding the current element value to the sum of the previous element values.

console.log(
  [1, 2, 3, 4].reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0)
)
console.log(
  [].reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0)
)

Without default value

You get a TypeError

console.log(
  [].reduce((a, b) => a + b)
)

Prior to ES6's arrow functions

console.log(
  [1,2,3].reduce(function(acc, val) { return acc + val; }, 0)
)

console.log(
  [].reduce(function(acc, val) { return acc + val; }, 0)
)

Non-number inputs

If non-numbers are possible inputs, you may want to handle that?

console.log(
  ["hi", 1, 2, "frog"].reduce((a, b) => a + b)
)

let numOr0 = n => isNaN(n) ? 0 : n

console.log(
  ["hi", 1, 2, "frog"].reduce((a, b) => 
    numOr0(a) + numOr0(b))
)

Non-recommended dangerous eval use

We can use eval to execute a string representation of JavaScript code. Using the Array.prototype.join function to convert the array to a string, we change [1,2,3] into "1+2+3", which evaluates to 6.

console.log(
  eval([1,2,3].join('+'))
)

//This way is dangerous if the array is built
// from user input as it may be exploited eg: 

eval([1,"2;alert('Malicious code!')"].join('+'))

Of course displaying an alert isn't the worst thing that could happen. The only reason I have included this is as an answer Ortund's question as I do not think it was clarified.

  • 7
    Why did you even show the eval way? I will have nightmares about this tonight for sure. – EJTH May 15 at 18:34
  • 3
    Because knowing why eval shouldn't be used often is worth more then "just don't use it". – Martijn Jun 14 at 14:05
var arr = [1,2,3,4];
var total=0;
for(var i in arr) { total += arr[i]; }
  • 2
    This is way faster than the jQuery.each() solution above. – Angry Dan Aug 24 '11 at 9:39
  • 5
    And also doesn't work in IE9- – dmkc Jul 26 '12 at 4:13
  • 36
    @Sprog: However, using (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) is even faster. And even then, using var sum=0; var i=arr.length; while(i--) sum += arr[i] is even faster still. – Riking Oct 21 '12 at 4:36
  • 12
    Using for... in loops on arrays works in this case _ coincidentally_ and because arrays extend objects. Riking's solution is better – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 7 '13 at 3:29
  • 2
    @BenjaminGruenbaum provided that nothing has added enumerable properties to array's prototype... – canon Jan 7 '16 at 14:47
var total = 0;
$.each(arr,function() {
    total += this;
});
  • 77
    Please, please, please use the answer with reduce below; do not declare mutable vars when you do not have too. – Bruno Grieder Feb 27 '15 at 14:29
  • 9
    This answer is under meta discussion – Madara Uchiha Jan 7 '16 at 10:24
  • 11
    Please do not use this, even though it is the "accepted answer"; the answer by Florian below is much better! – Andy Sinclair Jan 7 '16 at 14:13
  • 9
    @BrunoGrieder "Do not declare mutable vars when you do not have to" is an extremely biased opinion about an imperative language, it is hardly a code smell by any stretch of the imagination. There's absolutely nothing wrong with Tyler's answer, and the only difference between Tyler's and Florian's is style. – Rob Jan 11 '16 at 9:43
  • 5
    From OP: I thought $.each might be useful, but I'm not sure how to implement it. This maybe not be the best, but answer the OP's request. – user4227915 Jan 11 '16 at 15:30

This is possible by looping over all items, and adding them on each iteration to a sum-variable.

var array = [1, 2, 3];

for (var i = 0, sum = 0; i < array.length; sum += array[i++]);

JavaScript doesn't know block scoping, so sum will be accesible:

console.log(sum); // => 6

The same as above, however annotated and prepared as a simple function:

function sumArray(array) {
  for (
    var
      index = 0,              // The iterator
      length = array.length,  // Cache the array length
      sum = 0;                // The total amount
      index < length;         // The "for"-loop condition
      sum += array[index++]   // Add number on each iteration
  );
  return sum;
}
  • 9
    While clever, I'd find code declaring sum outside the loop much more readable. – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 5 '16 at 13:57
  • @BeniCherniavsky-Paskin Yeah, same here... Don't know why I did it this way that day... However, I'll let it as it is! It's just an example of how we might could... ;) – yckart Jan 5 '16 at 14:19
  • Since ES6, javascript DOES know block scoping with const and let. So you can declare sum outside the for loop as let sum = 0;. You can also cache the array length before the loop as const length = array.length; – KSK Nov 22 '17 at 1:35
arr.reduce(function (a, b) {
    return a + b;
});

Reference: Array.prototype.reduce()

  • 6
    This will fail if arr is []. – user663031 Jan 10 '16 at 17:05
  • 7
    Add a default value, like so: arr.reduce(function (a, b) { return a + b; }, 0); – Ngz Jun 17 '16 at 2:25

If you happen to be using Lodash you can use the sum function

array = [1, 2, 3, 4];
sum = _.sum(array);//10
  • Why the downvote? – David Grinberg Jan 8 '16 at 19:11
  • Because you are using _ !? – Veera Nov 16 '17 at 22:10
// Given array 'arr'
var i = arr.length;
var sum = 0;
while (--i) sum += arr[i];

This will take on average 1.57 ms/run (measured over 1000 runs on an array of 100 random normal numbers), compared to 3.604 ms/run with the eval() method above and 2.151 ms/run with a standard for(i,length,++) loop.

Methodology note: this test was run on a Google Apps Script server, so their javascript engines are pretty much the same as Chrome.

EDIT: --i instead of i-- saves 0.12 ms each run (i-- is 1.7)

EDIT: Holy expletive, never mind this whole post. Use the reduce() method mentioned above, it's only 1 ms/run.

You can also use reduceRight.

[1,2,3,4,5,6].reduceRight(function(a,b){return a+b;})

which results output as 21.

Reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/ReduceRight

  • Should be faster in chrome because the optimization to javascript looping (i.e. decrementing the length) can also be applied to the underlying assembly to make it run faster. – Jack Giffin Mar 13 '17 at 19:01

Anyone looking for a functional oneliner like me? Take this:

sum= arr.reduce(function (a, b) {return a + b;}, 0);
  • You can add an initial value for reduce as the 2nd param: arr.reduce(function(a, b) { return a + b;}, 0); – Ngz Jun 17 '16 at 2:28
  • Thanks! i'll incorporate that. – aexl Jun 18 '16 at 11:16

Funny approach:

eval([1,2,3].join("+"))
  • 4
    Please could you expand on this answer by explaining what is happening in this code? Why does it work? What does it do exactly? These things help to improve the quality of the answer. – Ortund Oct 21 '16 at 8:54
  • @user40521 has already answered this the way i think. I didn't see it. – electron Oct 21 '16 at 9:34
  • While this is short and sweet, and certainly interesting, it is also very inefficient. Using reduce is definitely preferable for the majority, if not all, cases. – Ninjakannon Jan 15 at 10:45

A standard JavaScript solution:

var addition = [];
addition.push(2);
addition.push(3);

var total = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < addition.length; i++)
{
    total += addition[i];
}
alert(total);          // Just to output an example
/* console.log(total); // Just to output an example with Firebug */

This works for me (the result should be 5). I hope there is no hidden disadvantage in this kind of solution.

  • 1
    Also, any C or Java programmer would be able to understand this. – h22 Jan 11 '16 at 7:31
  • for the simple purpose of summing up all values the simple plain old for loop has no rivals in terms of execution time – fedeghe Oct 25 '17 at 21:48

I am a beginner with JavaScript and coding in general, but I found that a simple and easy way to sum the numbers in an array is like this:

    var myNumbers = [1,2,3,4,5]
    var total = 0;
    for(i=0; i<myArray.length; i++){
        total += myArray[i];
    }

Basically, I wanted to contribute this because I didn't see many solutions that don't use built in functions, and this method is easy to write and understand.

var totally = eval(arr.join('+'))

That way you can put all kinds of exotic things in the array.

var arr = ['(1/3)','Date.now()','foo','bar()',1,2,3,4]

I'm only half joking.

  • 17
    I'm half laughing – caub Sep 7 '16 at 11:09

A short piece of JavaScript code would do this job:

var numbers = [1,2,3,4];
var totalAmount = 0;

for (var x = 0; x < numbers.length; x++) {

    totalAmount += numbers[x];
}

console.log(totalAmount); //10 (1+2+3+4)

A few people have suggested adding a .sum() method to the Array.prototype. This is generally considered bad practice so I'm not suggesting that you do it.

If you still insist on doing it then this is a succinct way of writing it:

Array.prototype.sum = function() {return [].reduce.call(this, (a,i) => a+i, 0);}

then: [1,2].sum(); // 3

Note that the function added to the prototype is using a mixture of ES5 and ES6 function and arrow syntax. The function is declared to allow the method to get the this context from the Array that you're operating on. I used the => for brevity inside the reduce call.

OK, imagine you have this array below:

const arr = [1, 2, 3, 4];

Let's start looking into many different ways to do it as I couldn't find any comprehensive answer here:

1) Using built-in reduce()

function total(arr) {
  if(!Array.isArray(arr)) return;
  return arr.reduce((a, v)=>a + v);
}

2) Using for loop

function total(arr) {
  if(!Array.isArray(arr)) return;
  let totalNumber = 0;
  for (let i=0,l=arr.length; i<l; i++) {
     totalNumber+=arr[i];
  }
  return totalNumber;
}

3) Using while loop

function total(arr) {
  if(!Array.isArray(arr)) return;
  let totalNumber = 0, i=-1;
  while (++i < arr.length) {
     totalNumber+=arr[i];
  }
  return totalNumber;
}

4) Using array forEach

function total(arr) {
  if(!Array.isArray(arr)) return;
  let sum=0;
  arr.forEach(each => {
    sum+=each;
  });
  return sum;
};

and call it like this:

total(arr); //return 10

It's not recommended to prototype something like this to Array...

Use reduce

let arr = [1, 2, 3, 4];

let sum = arr.reduce((v, i) => (v + i));

console.log(sum);

Here's an elegant one-liner solution that uses stack algorithm, though one may take some time to understand the beauty of this implementation.

const getSum = arr => (arr.length === 1) ? arr[0] : arr.pop() + getSum(arr);

getSum([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) //15

Basically, the function accepts an array and checks whether the array contains exactly one item. If false, it pop the last item out of the stack and return the updated array.

The beauty of this snippet is that the function includes arr[0] checking to prevent infinite looping. Once it reaches the last item, it returns the entire sum.

You can combine reduce() method with lambda expression:

[1, 2, 3, 4].reduce((accumulator, currentValue) => accumulator + currentValue);

Cool tricks here, I've got a nit pick with a lot of the safe traditional answers not caching the length of the array.

function arraySum(array){
  var total = 0,
      len = array.length;

  for (var i = 0; i < len; i++){
    total += array[i];
  }

  return total;
};

var my_array = [1,2,3,4];

// Returns 10
console.log( arraySum( my_array ) );

Without caching the length of the array the JS compiler needs to go through the array with every iteration of the loop to calculate the length, it's unnecessary overhead in most cases. V8 and a lot of modern browsers optimize this for us, so it is less of a concern then it was, but there are older devices that benefit from this simple caching.

If the length is subject to change, caching's that could cause some unexpected side effects if you're unaware of why you're caching the length, but for a reusable function who's only purpose is to take an array and add the values together it's a great fit.

Here's a CodePen link for this arraySum function. http://codepen.io/brandonbrule/pen/ZGEJyV

It's possible this is an outdated mindset that's stuck with me, but I don't see a disadvantage to using it in this context.

  • The issue of caching the length is a red herring. JS engines will optimize this for you without blinking. – user663031 Jan 10 '16 at 17:06

Those are really great answers, but just in case if the numbers are in sequence like in the question ( 1,2,3,4) you can easily do that by applying the formula (n*(n+1))/2 where n is the last number

This is much easier

function sumArray(arr) {
    var total = 0;
    arr.forEach(function(element){
        total += element;
    })
    return total;
}

var sum = sumArray([1,2,3,4])

console.log(sum)

No need to initial value! Because if no initial value is passed, the callback function is not invoked on the first element of the list, and the first element is instead passed as the initial value. Very cOOl feature :)

[1, 2, 3, 4].reduce((a, x) => a + x) // 10
[1, 2, 3, 4].reduce((a, x) => a * x) // 24
[1, 2, 3, 4].reduce((a, x) => Math.max(a, x)) // 4
[1, 2, 3, 4].reduce((a, x) => Math.min(a, x)) // 1

i saw all answers going for 'reduce' solution

var array = [1,2,3,4]
var total = 0
for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    total += array[i]
}
console.log(total)
Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'sum', {
    enumerable:false,
    value:function() {
        var t=0;for(var i in this)
            if (!isNaN(this[i]))
                t+=this[i];
        return t;
    }
});

[20,25,27.1].sum()                 // 72.1
[10,"forty-two",23].sum()          // 33
[Math.PI,0,-1,1].sum()             // 3.141592653589793
[Math.PI,Math.E,-1000000000].sum() // -999999994.1401255

o = {a:1,b:31,c:"roffelz",someOtherProperty:21.52}
console.log(o.sum());              // 53.519999999999996
  • Does this code remove your operating system? Or does it send your personal information to me? – SteveFest Sep 9 '17 at 12:21

try this...

function arrSum(arr){
    total = 0;  
    arr.forEach(function(key){
        total = total + key;            
    });
    return total;
}
  • 3
    Please add an explanation to your answer. Code only answers don't explain how the code works. – Alexander Huszagh Jun 30 '17 at 7:47

Vanilla JavaScript is all you need:

> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; a.forEach(function(e){sum += e}); sum
10
> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; a.forEach(e => sum += e); sum
10
> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; for(e in a) sum += e; sum
"00123foobar"
> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; for(e of a) sum += e; sum
10

This function can sum up all the numbers -

 function array(arr){
   var sum = 0;
   for (var i = 0; i< arr.length; i++){
    sum += arr[i];
   }
   console.log(sum);
 }
 array([5, 1, 3, 3])

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