681

Given an array [1, 2, 3, 4], how can I find the sum of its elements? (In this case, the sum would be 10.)

I thought $.each might be useful, but I'm not sure how to implement it.

  • 4
    This question is under meta discussion – Madara Uchiha Jan 7 '16 at 10:24
  • 13
    @tereško Unwillingness to google is not a valid close reason on Stackoverflow. Please downvote if you feel that the question is not well (re)searched. (Also judging by the answers - this seems to be a highly controversial topic with many possible solutions including some highly upvoted bad practises (eval) - surprisingly.) – Trilarion Jan 7 '16 at 10:26
  • 7
    Note: most answers here essentially compute a[0] + a[1] + ..., which can turn into string concatenation if the array has non-number elements. E.g. ['foo', 42].reduce((a,b)=>a+b, 0) === "0foo42". – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 10 '16 at 17:00

41 Answers 41

1

Vanilla JavaScript is all you need:

> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; a.forEach(function(e){sum += e}); sum
10
> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; a.forEach(e => sum += e); sum
10
> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; for(e in a) sum += e; sum
"00123foobar"
> a = [1,2,3,4]; a.foo = 5; a['bar'] = 6; sum = 0; for(e of a) sum += e; sum
10
1

This function can sum up all the numbers -

 function array(arr){
   var sum = 0;
   for (var i = 0; i< arr.length; i++){
    sum += arr[i];
   }
   console.log(sum);
 }
 array([5, 1, 3, 3])
0

With ES6 rest parameter

let array = [1, 2, 3, 4]

function sum(...numbers) {
    let total = 0;
    for (const number of numbers) {
        total += number;
    }
    return total;
}

console.log(sum(...array));

  • Note that given a large array this will give stack overflow exceptions (spread operator in general is can result in this with large inputs) – Colin D Nov 2 at 3:36
0

Just use this function:

function sum(pArray)
{
  pArray = pArray.reduce(function (a, b) {
      return a + b;
  }, 0);

  return pArray;
}

function sum(pArray)
{
  pArray = pArray.reduce(function (a, b) {
      return a + b;
  }, 0);

  return pArray;
}

var arr = [1, 4, 5];

console.log(sum(arr));

0

A "duplicate" question asked how to do this for a two-dimensional array, so this is a simple adaptation to answer that question. (The difference is only the six characters [2], 0, which finds the third item in each subarray and passes an initial value of zero):

const twoDimensionalArray = [
  [10, 10, 1],
  [10, 10, 2],
  [10, 10, 3],
];
const sum = twoDimensionalArray.reduce( (partial_sum, a) => partial_sum + a[2], 0 ) ; 
console.log(sum); // 6

0

Increase Accuracy: sort array and start sum form smallest numbers

[...arr].sort().reduce((a,c)=>a+c,0)

arr=[.6,9,.1,.1,.1,.1]

sum     =             arr.reduce((a,c)=>a+c,0)
sortSum = [...arr].sort().reduce((a,c)=>a+c,0)

console.log('sum:     ',sum);
console.log('sortSum:',sortSum);
console.log('sum==sortSum :', sum==sortSum);

For multidimensional array of numbers use arr.flat(Infinity)

arr= [ [ [1,2,3,4],[1,2,3,4],[1,2,3,4] ],
       [ [1,2,3,4],[1,2,3,4],[1,2,3,4] ] ];
      
sum = arr.flat(Infinity).reduce((a,c)=> a+c,0);

console.log(sum);  // 60

0

When the array consists of strings one has to alter the code. This can be the case, if the array is a result from a databank request. This code works:

alert(
["1", "2", "3", "4"].reduce((a, b) => Number(a) + Number(b), 0)
);

Here, ["1", "2", "3", "4"] ist the string array and the function Number() converts the strings to numbers.

-2

For really large numbers cycling or reducing could be process intensive. What about using Gauss?

sum = (n * (n+1))/2;

From mathcentral.

  • This only works for sequential arrays starting at 1, with a step of 1. Granted, the OPs question includes an example which may be confusing, since [1, 2, 3, 4] fits the bill. But what if we want to sum this one: [1, 7, 21, 10009, 300198] ? – Silviu Preda Jan 16 '18 at 12:40
-3

Use recursion

var sum = (arr) => arr.length === 1 ? arr[0] : arr.shift() + sum(arr);
sum([1,2,3,4]) // 10
  • 1
    Non-destructive version: arr.length === 1 ? arr[0] : arr[0] + sum(arr.slice(1)) – yckart May 26 '17 at 1:12
-3
    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <body>

      <p>Click the button to join two arrays.</p>
      <button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
      <p id="demo"></p>
    <script>
var hege = [1, 2,4,6,7,8,8];
var stale = [1, 2,4,5];
function myFunction() {
    console.log((hege.length > stale.length))    
    var children  = (hege.length > stale.length)? abc1() :abc2();       document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = children;
}
function abc1(){
    console.log(hege,"Abc1")    
    var abcd=hege.map(function (num, idx) {
        console.log(hege.length , idx)
        return stale.length>idx?num + stale[idx]:num;
    })
    return abcd;
}

function abc2(){

    console.log(hege,"Abc2",stale)    
    var abcd=stale.map(function (num, idx) {
        console.log(hege.length , idx)
        return hege.length>idx?num + hege[idx]:num;
    })
    return abcd;
}
</script>

</body>
</html>
  • Just pasting code does not help, please try to explain your solution. – Will Jun 1 at 3:03
-9

Use map:

var sum = 0;
arr.map(function(item){
    sum += item;
});

// sum now contains the total.

You could potentially add the method to the Array prototype.

Array.prototype.sum = function(){
    var sum = 0;
    this.map(function(item){
        sum += item;
    });
    return sum;
}

Then you can use it on any Array like so:

arr.sum();
  • 25
    That's because it's wrong to use map in this case. map maps array elements somewhere, what you're looking for if you want to be functional is reduce – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 7 '13 at 3:25
  • 14
    forEach should be used instead of map in this case. – Oleg May 25 '13 at 16:09
  • 2
    Extending the prototype of built-in objects is bad in my opinion. Use a separate utility class for methods like these or some other method. – oldwizard Oct 15 '15 at 10:43
  • 2
    You're using map() improperly. It's supposed to be used to generate a new array from an existing array... and that's exactly what it's doing in this case. It's instantiating and returning an entirely unnecessary array, populated with undefined. On top of that, you've polluted Array.prototype with another enumerable property. The array methods map, forEach, filter, reduce, some, etc are built with specific purposes in mind. While this may "function" it's ridiculously inefficient because it's doing unnecessary work... because you've selected the inappropriate method. – I am Monica Jan 7 '16 at 14:56
  • 1
    you're showing well what to not do – caub Sep 7 '16 at 11:14

protected by Josh Crozier Nov 16 '18 at 2:13

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