98

I have a django project with the django-allauth app. I need to collect additional data from the user at signup. I came across a similar question here but unfortunately, no one answered the profile customization part.

Per the documentation provided for django-allauth:

ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS (=None)

A string pointing to a custom form class (e.g. ‘myapp.forms.SignupForm’) that is used during signup to ask the user for additional input (e.g. newsletter signup, birth date). This class should implement a ‘save’ method, accepting the newly signed up user as its only parameter.

I am new to django and am struggling with this. Can someone provide an example of such a custom form class? Do I need to add a model class as well with a link to the user object like this ?

158

Suppose you want to ask the user for his first/last name during signup. You'll need to put these fields in your own form, like so:

class SignupForm(forms.Form):
    first_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30, label='Voornaam')
    last_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30, label='Achternaam')

    def signup(self, request, user):
        user.first_name = self.cleaned_data['first_name']
        user.last_name = self.cleaned_data['last_name']
        user.save()

Then, in your settings point to this form:

ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS = 'yourproject.yourapp.forms.SignupForm'

That's all.

  • 10
    Thanks. It is always good to hear from the original author :). Do I need to create an additional class to store this info or does allauth take care of that automatically? – Shreyas Sep 7 '12 at 20:10
  • 12
    That actually depends on the information you are asking. In any case, this is all beyond allauth scope. If you ask for first/last name as in the example above, then you do not need an extra model and can place things directly into the User model. If you would ask for the user's birthdate, his favorite color or whatever, then you need to setup your own profile model for this. Please have a look here on how to do this: docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/auth/… – pennersr Sep 9 '12 at 20:36
  • 6
    That's exactly what I was looking for - an additional field like favorite color. In case I am interested in say, the favorite color, I believe I should create a new UserProfile class and then use the User as a one to one field and the favorite color as the additional field. In that case, can I still use a type of SignUpForm you have declared (with favorite color) above and hook up the ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS to it or do I need to create the form and handle saving of data in my own code? – Shreyas Sep 10 '12 at 1:03
  • 4
    Sure, the ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS mechanism can still be used. You just have to make sure that the save() method is properly implemented such that the favorite color is stored in whatever model you want. – pennersr Sep 11 '12 at 21:15
  • 5
    @pennersr - How could I hoop up this ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS after the very first social signin to collect and save the custom user model fields? Also the usage of custom user model by AUTH_USER_MODEL changes from git:github.com/pennersr/django-allauth are not uploaded in pypi. – Babu Nov 23 '12 at 18:46
22

Using the solution suggested by pennersr I was getting a DeprecationWarning:

DeprecationWarning: The custom signup form must offer a def signup(self, request, user) method DeprecationWarning)

This is because as of version 0.15 the save method has been deprecated in favour of a def signup(request, user) method.

So to solve this, the code of the example should be like this:

class SignupForm(forms.Form):
    first_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30, label='Voornaam')
    last_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30, label='Achternaam')

    def signup(self, request, user):
        user.first_name = self.cleaned_data['first_name']
        user.last_name = self.cleaned_data['last_name']
        user.save()
  • 1
    @pennsesr's answer has now been edited to use signup instead of save. – Flimm Sep 1 '17 at 15:29
15

Here's what worked for me combining a few of the other answers (none of them are 100% complete and DRY).

In yourapp/forms.py:

from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
from django import forms

class SignupForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = get_user_model()
        fields = ['first_name', 'last_name']

    def signup(self, request, user):
        user.first_name = self.cleaned_data['first_name']
        user.last_name = self.cleaned_data['last_name']
        user.save()

And in settings.py:

ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS = 'yourapp.forms.SignupForm'

This way it uses the model forms so that it's DRY, and uses the new def signup. I tried putting 'myproject.myapp.forms.SignupForm' but that resulted in a error somehow.

  • using 'yourapp.forms.SignupForm' instead of 'myproject.myapp.forms.SignupForm' worked for me as well – alpalalpal Dec 23 '18 at 20:01
6

@Shreyas: The below solution may not be the cleanest, but it works. Please let me know if you have any suggestions to clean it up any further.

To add information that does not belong to the default user profile, first create a model in yourapp/models.py. Read the general django docs to learn more about it, but basicly:

from django.db import models

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User, related_name='profile')
    organisation = models.CharField(organisation, max_length=100, blank=True)

Then create a form in yourapp/forms.py:

from django import forms

class SignupForm(forms.Form):
    first_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30, label='Voornaam')
    last_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30, label='Achternaam')
    organisation = forms.CharField(max_length=20, label='organisation')

    def signup(self, request, user):
        user.first_name = self.cleaned_data['first_name']
        user.last_name = self.cleaned_data['last_name']
        # Replace 'profile' below with the related_name on the OneToOneField linking back to the User model
        up = user.profile
        up.organisation = self.cleaned_data['organisation']
        user.save()
        up.save()
  • This is exactly what I ended up using for a Django 2.0 app that's running Wagtail CMS. Worked for regular sign up, but less so with Social Auth it seems? – Kalob Taulien Jul 6 '18 at 16:58
  • How would I add this extra field to the admin page for the user in Wagtail? – Joshua Sep 16 at 19:18
4

In your users/forms.py you put:

from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
class SignupForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = get_user_model()
        fields = ['first_name', 'last_name']
    def save(self, user):
        user.save()

In settings.py you put:

ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS = 'users.forms.SignupForm'

In this way you don't break DRY principle by multiplicity User models fields definition.

4

I've tried many different tutorials and all of them is missing something, repeating unnecessary code or doing weird things, bellow follows my solution that joins all the options that I've found, it's working, I have already put it in production BUT it still not convincing me because I would expect to receive first_name and last_name inside the functions that I attached to Users create to avoid creating a profile inside the form but I couldn't, by the away I think it will help you.

Models.py

class Profile(models.Model):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User, on_delete=models.CASCADE)
    bio = models.TextField(max_length=500, blank=True)
    nationality = models.CharField(max_length=2, choices=COUNTRIES)
    gender = models.CharField(max_length=1, choices=GENDERS)

def __str__(self):
    return self.user.first_name


@receiver(post_save, sender=User)
def create_user_profile(sender, instance, created, **kwargs):
    if created:
        Profile.objects.create(user=instance)

@receiver(post_save, sender=User)
def save_user_profile(sender, instance, **kwargs):
    instance.profile.save()

Forms.py

class SignupForm(forms.ModelForm):
    first_name = forms.CharField(max_length=100)
    last_name = forms.CharField(max_length=100)

    class Meta:
        model = Profile
        fields = ('first_name', 'last_name', 'nationality', 'gender')

    def signup(self, request, user):
        # Save your user
        user.first_name = self.cleaned_data['first_name']
        user.last_name = self.cleaned_data['last_name']
        user.save()

        user.profile.nationality = self.cleaned_data['nationality']
        user.profile.gender = self.cleaned_data['gender']
        user.profile.save()

Settings.py

ACCOUNT_SIGNUP_FORM_CLASS = 'apps.profile.forms.SignupForm'
  • Ironically, this is missing a few things too. The Profile fields have no defaults, nor do they allow null, so your create_user_profile signal fails by design. Secondly, you can reduce this to one signal, based on created, especially when talking DRY. And third, you effect a Profile save by calling user.save() in your view, then saving the profile again with actual data. – Melvyn Aug 30 '17 at 14:35
  • @Melvyn Shouldn't it be fields = [...] with square braces instead of fields = (...) parenthesis ? – Ahtisham Jan 8 '18 at 14:39
  • It can, but does not have to be. It is only used read-only to check if the field on the Model should be part of the form. So it can be a list, tuple or set or any derivative thereof. Since tuples are not mutable, it makes more sense to use tuples and prevent accidental mutations. From a performance perspective, these collections are in practice too small to have any impact. Once the collection gets too long, it may make sense to switch to exclude instead. – Melvyn Jan 8 '18 at 14:59
-10

Create a Profile Model with user as OneToOneField

class Profile(models.Model):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User, verbose_name=_('user'), related_name='profiles')
    first_name=models.CharField(_("First Name"), max_length=150)
    last_name=models.CharField(_("Last Name"), max_length=150)
    mugshot = ImageField(_('mugshot'), upload_to = upload_to, blank=True)
    phone= models.CharField(_("Phone Number"), max_length=100)
    security_question = models.ForeignKey(SecurityQuestion, related_name='security_question')
    answer=models.CharField(_("Answer"), max_length=200)
    recovery_number= models.CharField(_("Recovery Mobile Number"), max_length=100)
    city=models.ForeignKey(City,related_name='city', blank=True, null=True, help_text=_('Select your City'))
    location=models.ForeignKey(Country,related_name='location', blank=True, null=True, help_text=_('Select your Location'))
  • 3
    Thanks, but I don't think that this is all that is needed. My question specifically refers to the allauth app. – Shreyas Sep 6 '12 at 15:52

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