46

I have this table in MySQL, for example:

ID | Name
1  | Bob
4  | Adam
6  | Someguy

If you notice, there is no ID number (2, 3 and 5).

How can I write a query so that MySQL would answer the missing IDs only, in this case: "2,3,5" ?

8 Answers 8

51
SELECT a.id+1 AS start, MIN(b.id) - 1 AS end
    FROM testtable AS a, testtable AS b
    WHERE a.id < b.id
    GROUP BY a.id
    HAVING start < MIN(b.id)

Hope this link also helps http://www.codediesel.com/mysql/sequence-gaps-in-mysql/

1
  • This was genius! Thanks
    – McRui
    May 20, 2018 at 19:32
32

A more efficent query:

SELECT (t1.id + 1) as gap_starts_at, 
       (SELECT MIN(t3.id) -1 FROM my_table t3 WHERE t3.id > t1.id) as gap_ends_at
FROM my_table t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT t2.id FROM my_table t2 WHERE t2.id = t1.id + 1)
HAVING gap_ends_at IS NOT NULL
4
  • Thanks Ivan. This runs so much quicker!
    – MikeC
    May 19, 2016 at 1:24
  • This worked for me, except that it missed the initial gap starting at id=1
    – egprentice
    Oct 4, 2017 at 14:56
  • MySQL returned an empty result set (i.e. zero rows). (Query took 60.3183 seconds.) -- It took just over a minute to check more than 2 million records. Aug 6, 2019 at 12:54
  • Can you tweak this query so that it would return N missing IDs? I.e. - I would like to retrieve first 10 missing primary keys, ordered by their value. No need to report on all gaps.
    – temuri
    Feb 14, 2020 at 14:18
7

Rather than returning multiple ranges of IDs, if you instead want to retrieve every single missing ID itself, each one on its own row, you could do the following:

SELECT id+1 FROM table WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT id-1 FROM table) ORDER BY 1

The query is very efficient. However, it also includes one extra row on the end, which is equal to the highest ID number, plus 1. This last row can be ignored in your server script, by checking for the number of rows returned (mysqli_num_rows), and then using a for loop if the number of rows is greater than 1 (the query will always return at least one row).

Edit: I recently discovered that my original solution did not return all ID numbers that are missing, in cases where missing numbers are contiguous (i.e. right next to each other). However, the query is still useful in working out whether or not there are numbers missing at all, very quickly, and would be a time saver when used in conjunction with hagensoft's query (top answer). In other words, this query could be run first to test for missing IDs. If anything is found, then hagensoft's query could be run immediately afterwards to help identify the exact IDs that are missing (no time saved, but not much slower at all). If nothing is found, then a considerable amount of time is potentially saved, as hagensoft's query would not need to be run.

2
  • 1
    Whery simple, very clever, very fast. Indeed, if the table is too large the accepted version is not feasible in a reasonable time (large means 200,000 records).
    – giordano
    Dec 2, 2020 at 17:04
  • this is spectacular result. :)
    – yodann
    May 5 at 5:56
4

To add a little to Ivan's answer, this version shows numbers missing at the beginning if 1 doesn't exist:

SELECT 1 as gap_starts_at,
       (SELECT MIN(t4.id) -1 FROM testtable t4 WHERE t4.id > 1) as gap_ends_at
FROM testtable t5
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT t6.id FROM testtable t6 WHERE t6.id = 1)
HAVING gap_ends_at IS NOT NULL limit 1
UNION
SELECT (t1.id + 1) as gap_starts_at, 
       (SELECT MIN(t3.id) -1 FROM testtable t3 WHERE t3.id > t1.id) as gap_ends_at
FROM testtable t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT t2.id FROM testtable t2 WHERE t2.id = t1.id + 1)
HAVING gap_ends_at IS NOT NULL;
0
3

It would be far more efficient to get the start of the gap in one query and the end of the gap in one query.

I had 18M records and it took me less than a second each to get the two results. When I tried getting them together my query timed out after an hour.

Get the start of gap:

SELECT (t1.id + 1) as MissingID
FROM sequence t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS 
    (SELECT t2.id 
    FROM sequence t2 
    WHERE t2.id = t1.id + 1);

Get the end of gap:

SELECT (t1.id - 1) as MissingID
FROM sequence t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS 
    (SELECT t2.id 
    FROM sequence t2 
    WHERE t2.id = t1.id - 1);    
1
  • 1
    Just a clarrification, I was suppose to have 18m records. It turns out I had only 3m records in my database and missed 15m records.
    – James G
    Nov 23, 2018 at 1:09
2

Above queries will give two columns so you can try this to get the missing numbers in a single column

select start from 
(SELECT a.id+1 AS start, MIN(b.id) - 1 AS end
    FROM sequence AS a, sequence AS b
    WHERE a.id < b.id
    GROUP BY a.id
    HAVING start < MIN(b.id)) b
UNION
select c.end from (SELECT a.id+1 AS start, MIN(b.id) - 1 AS end
    FROM sequence AS a, sequence AS b
    WHERE a.id < b.id
    GROUP BY a.id
    HAVING start < MIN(b.id)) c order by start;
1
  • With this one-column version, I get (for example) 475, 477, 506, 508, 513 but with the two-column version, it gets me the [475,475], [477,506], [508,513] which tells me I am missing numbers 475, 477-506, and 508-513.
    – Jo.
    Jun 30, 2017 at 20:04
1

By using window functions (available in mysql 8) finding the gaps in the id column can be expressed as:

WITH gaps AS
(
    SELECT
        LAG(id, 1, 0) OVER(ORDER BY id) AS gap_begin,
        id AS gap_end,
        id - LAG(id, 1, 0) OVER(ORDER BY id) AS gap
    FROM test
)
SELECT
    gap_begin,
    gap_end
FROM gaps
WHERE gap > 1
;

if you are on the older version of the mysql you would have to rely on the variables (so called poor-man's window function idiom)

SELECT
   gap_begin,
   gap_end
FROM (
     SELECT
         @id_previous AS gap_begin,
         id AS gap_end,
         id - @id_previous AS gap,
         @id_previous := id
     FROM (
         SELECT
             t.id
         FROM test t
         ORDER BY t.id
     ) AS sorted
     JOIN (
         SELECT
             @id_previous := 0
     ) AS init_vars
 ) AS gaps
WHERE gap > 1
;
1
  • 1
    Works great (only tried the older versions form) Sep 10, 2021 at 8:54
0

if you want a lighter way to search millions of rows of data,

SET @st=0,@diffSt=0,@diffEnd=0;
SELECT res.startID, res.endID, res.diff
  , CONCAT(
    "SELECT * FROM lost_consumer WHERE ID BETWEEN "
    ,res.startID+1, " AND ", res.endID-1) as `query`
FROM (
SELECT
  @diffSt:=(@st) `startID`
  , @diffEnd:=(a.ID) `endID`
  , @st:=a.ID `end`
  , @diffEnd-@diffSt-1 `diff`
  FROM consumer a 
ORDER BY a.ID
) res
WHERE res.diff>0;

check out this http://sqlfiddle.com/#!9/3ea00c/9

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