10

What is the most efficient way to produce an array of 100 numbers that form the shape of the triangle wave below, with a max/min amplitude of 0.5?

Triangle waveform in mind:

enter image description here

  • do you need just to arrange the data structure or to draw a graphical representation too? – Nadir Sampaoli Sep 8 '12 at 16:29
  • Only need to make an array of 100 data entries that take that shape. Graphical representation not needed! – 8765674 Sep 8 '12 at 16:29
  • Wikipedia has 3 different formulas you can use to calculate a triangle wave: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_wave#Definitions There might be quicker ways, but implementing one of those equations should be a nice starting point. – Robert Rouhani Sep 8 '12 at 16:31
  • I think it might be simpler to build the array using three parts, as y=(-)x. I.e. The first would be pylab.arange(0,0.5,25) – 8765674 Sep 8 '12 at 16:36
  • How important is speed really for you? I assume it doesn't really matter much, but if it does, you should rewrite the examples below to make more use of np.arange as you said, create an empty array and then fill it with np.arange elements for example (instead of iterations below). – seberg Sep 8 '12 at 17:48
8

Use a generator:

def triangle(length, amplitude):
     section = length // 4
     for direction in (1, -1):
         for i in range(section):
             yield i * (amplitude / section) * direction
         for i in range(section):
             yield (amplitude - (i * (amplitude / section))) * direction

This'll work fine for a length divisible by 4, you may miss up to 3 values for other lengths.

>>> list(triangle(100, 0.5))
[0.0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.1, 0.12, 0.14, 0.16, 0.18, 0.2, 0.22, 0.24, 0.26, 0.28, 0.3, 0.32, 0.34, 0.36, 0.38, 0.4, 0.42, 0.44, 0.46, 0.48, 0.5, 0.48, 0.46, 0.44, 0.42, 0.4, 0.38, 0.36, 0.33999999999999997, 0.32, 0.3, 0.28, 0.26, 0.24, 0.21999999999999997, 0.2, 0.18, 0.15999999999999998, 0.14, 0.12, 0.09999999999999998, 0.08000000000000002, 0.06, 0.03999999999999998, 0.020000000000000018, -0.0, -0.02, -0.04, -0.06, -0.08, -0.1, -0.12, -0.14, -0.16, -0.18, -0.2, -0.22, -0.24, -0.26, -0.28, -0.3, -0.32, -0.34, -0.36, -0.38, -0.4, -0.42, -0.44, -0.46, -0.48, -0.5, -0.48, -0.46, -0.44, -0.42, -0.4, -0.38, -0.36, -0.33999999999999997, -0.32, -0.3, -0.28, -0.26, -0.24, -0.21999999999999997, -0.2, -0.18, -0.15999999999999998, -0.14, -0.12, -0.09999999999999998, -0.08000000000000002, -0.06, -0.03999999999999998, -0.020000000000000018]
  • Much more efficient than my attempt. Thank you! – 8765674 Sep 8 '12 at 16:55
  • 1
    change range to xrange (if it's python < 3) – zenpoy Sep 8 '12 at 17:07
7

The simplest way to generate a triangle wave is by using signal.sawtooth. Notice that signal.sawtooth(phi, width) accepts two arguments. The first argument is the phase, the next argument specifies the symmetry. width = 1 gives a right-sided sawtooth, width = 0 gives a left-sided sawtooth and width = 0.5 gives a symmetric triangle. Enjoy!

from scipy import signal
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
t = np.linspace(0, 1, 500)
triangle = signal.sawtooth(2 * np.pi * 5 * t, 0.5)
plt.plot(t, triangle)
5

To use numpy:

def triangle2(length, amplitude):
    section = length // 4
    x = np.linspace(0, amplitude, section+1)
    mx = -x
    return np.r_[x, x[-2::-1], mx[1:], mx[-2:0:-1]]
3

Triangle is absolute value of sawtooth.

from scipy import signal
time=np.arange(0,1,0.001)
freq=3
tri=np.abs(signal.sawtooth(2 * np.pi * freq * time)) 
1

You can use an iterator generator along with the numpy fromiter method.

import numpy

def trigen(n, amp):
    y = 0
    x = 0
    s = amp / (n/4)
    while x < n:
        yield y
        y += s
        if abs(y) > amp:
            s *= -1
        x += 1

a = numpy.fromiter(trigen(100, 0.5), "d")

Now you have an array with the square wave.

0

Here is a home-made python function for triangular signals

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
phase=-10
length=30 # should be positive
amplitude=10
x=np.arange(0,100,0.1)
def triang(x,phase,length,amplitude):
    alpha=(amplitude)/(length/2)
    return -amplitude/2+amplitude*((x-phase)%length==length/2) \
            +alpha*((x-phase)%(length/2))*((x-phase)%length<=length/2) \
            +(amplitude-alpha*((x-phase)%(length/2)))*((x-phase)%length>length/2)

tr=triang(x,phase,length,amplitude)
plt.plot(tr)

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