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I got a function online to help me with my current project and it had semicolons on some of the lines. I was wondering why? Is it to break the function?

def containsAny(self, strings=[]):
    alphabet = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789'
    for string in strings:
        for char in string:
            if char in alphabet: return 1;
    return 0;

The function I got online with little modification:

for string in strings:
    for char in string:
        if char in alphabet: return 1;

Is the above saying the following?

if char in alphabet:
    return 1
    break
  • 2
    As a side note, you can do this in one line: any(char in alphabet for string in strings for char in string) – Eric Sep 8 '12 at 23:42
  • Really, Thanks i'll give it a try. – Crispy Sep 8 '12 at 23:45
  • So what will any = ? True or Falsee – Crispy Sep 9 '12 at 0:13
  • 1
    Yep. any returns True if any element in its iterable is True. – Eric Sep 9 '12 at 9:01
  • i used it, works a lot faster, thanks – Crispy Sep 15 '12 at 22:20
93
0

The semicolon does nothing in the code you show.

I suspect this is someone who programs in another language (C, Java, ...) that requires semicolons at the end of statements and it's just a habit (happens to me sometimes too).

If you want to put several Python statements on the same line, you can use a semi-colon to separate them, see this Python Doc:

A suite is a group of statements controlled by a clause. A suite can be one or more semicolon-separated simple statements on the same line as the header, following the header’s colon, or it can be one or more indented statements on subsequent lines

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  • @A.R.S. I got lucky .. plus I sometimes do the semicolon thing myself too :) – Levon Sep 8 '12 at 23:42
  • Thank You, i was a little confused. – Crispy Sep 8 '12 at 23:42
  • I usually code in PHP and found a semicolon in one of my working python code(written by me only, may be due to PHP practice), and I too was confused, how is it even working, and stumbled on this while searching – kadamb Jul 13 '17 at 13:02
  • @kadamb And I just started to code in PHP this summer, and I keep forgetting the semicolons :-) – Levon Jul 13 '17 at 16:25
17
1

The semicolon here does not do anything. People who come from C/C++/Java/(many other language) backgrounds tend to use the semicolon out of habit.

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1
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Programmers of C, C++, and Java are habituated of using a semicolon to tell the compiler that this is the end of a statement, but for Python this is not the case.

The reason is that in Python, newlines are an unambiguous way of separating code lines; this is by design, and the way this works has been thoroughly thought through. As a result, Python code is perfectly readable and unambiguous without any special end-of-statement markers (apart from the newline).

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  • 2
    "has been thoroughly thought through" -- It's not everyday that you can see those 3 words back to back in a normal conversation – CLOVIS Mar 12 '19 at 22:34
0
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As other answers point out, the semicolon does nothing there. It's a separator (e.g. print 1;print 2). But it does not work like this: def func():print 1;print 2;;print'Defined!' (;; is a syntax error). Out of habit, people tend to use it (as it is required in languages such as C/Java...).

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0
0

In general the semicolon does nothing. But if you are using the jupyter notebook (depending on your version), you might get a figure plotted twice. The semicolon at the end of your plot command prevents this:

df.plot();
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