37

I know that I can use map with a function of one variable in the following manner:

var squarefunc = function(x) {
    return x*x;
};
values = [1,2,3,4]
values.map(squarefunc) // returns [1,4,9,16]

How do I use map with the following function:

var squarefuncwithadjustment = function(x, adjustment) {
    return (x*x + adjustment);
}

where, I want to input value for argument adjustment manually when I call map, say adjustment=2, and have the value of x taken from the array values.

72

Use an anonymous function:

values.map(
  function(x) { return squarefuncwithadjustment(x, 2); }
);
  • Thanks! This seemed the cleanest and hence, I am accepting this one. – Curious2learn Sep 10 '12 at 1:27
  • 1
    this initiates the promise rather than saving it for the Promise.all(). How can I set and consume the promise declaratively? – mibbit Jan 31 '18 at 8:24
38

You could use a callback creation function:

var createSquareFuncWithAdjustment = function(adjustment) {
    return function(x) { return (x * x) + adjustment; };
};

values = [1, 2, 3, 4];
values.map(createSquareFuncWithAdjustment(2)); // returns [3, 6, 11, 18]
  • 3
    This is the solution that solves the wider problem of passing ancilliary parameters to a map-reduce chain, so gets my vote. – Sridhar-Sarnobat Jun 3 '15 at 4:39
  • @Sridhar-Sarnobat is this an example of a closure ? – Courtney Feb 5 '18 at 16:17
  • @Courtney I’ve never fully figured out what a closure is, but I would guess the answer is yes. – Sridhar-Sarnobat Feb 5 '18 at 17:40
  • @Courtney every function in JavaScript will close over the scope in which it was defined. In this specific case the inner anonymous function preserves access to the adjustment argument. – Peter Feb 5 '18 at 22:58
  • 2
    Thanks Peter. I like the solution. I’ve been trying to get to intermediate JS level. It’s such a dope language – Courtney Feb 5 '18 at 23:41
12

As of ES6 you can use:

.map((element) => func(element,params...))

In your case if I want to use 3 as adjustment:

values = [1,2,3,4]
values.map(n => squarefuncwithadjustment(n,3))
7

If you reverse the order of your arguments, you can bind the adjustment as the first argument, so that the x will be passed as the second.

var squarefuncwithadjustment = function(adjustment, x) {
    return (x*x + adjustment);
}

values.map(squarefuncwithadjustment.bind(null, 2)); // [3, 6, 11, 18]

The first argument to .bind sets the calling context, which doesn't matter here, so I used null. The second argument to .bind binds 2 as the first argument when invoked.

It may be better to store the function as a bound version.

var squareFuncWith2 = squarefuncwithadjustment.bind(null, 2);

Then use it with .map.

values.map(squareFuncWith2); // [3, 6, 11, 18]
4

Well!! You can easily pass a second parameter to the map function. The following method is widely used to pass this parameter which generally gets hidden during the call:

values.map(function(x , this) {
    return x*x + this.adjustment;
});

var adjustment = 1;
var values = [1,2,3,4]
values.map(function(x , adjustment) {
    return x*x + adjustment;
});

OR

var adjustment = 1;
var squarefunc = function(x , adjustment) {
    return x*x + adjustment;
};
values = [1,2,3,4]
values.map(squarefunc);
1

To perform this within a single function, you can add a dash of IIFE to your Curry.

function mapSingleFunc(values, adjustment) {
  return values.map((adjustment => x => (x * x) + adjustment)(adjustment));
};
console.log(mapSingleFunc([1,2,3,4], 2))

In the most abstract sense you are able to tunnel your values in through the calling array. Adding an IIFE allows you to feed the adjustment in each time in the closure.

0

ES6+ :

values.map( x => squarefuncwithadjustment(x,2) );
-2

var squarefuncwithadjustment = (x, adjustment) => { return (x*x + adjustment); }

Then

values = values.map( x => squarefuncwithadjustment(x, 2) );

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