112

So, I've got a function that returns a number of records that I want to implement paging for on my website. It was suggested to me that I use the Offset/Fetch Next in SQL Server 2012 to accomplish this. On our website, we have an area that lists total number of records and what page you're on at the time.

Before, I was getting the entire record set and was able to build the paging on that programatically. But using the SQL way with FETCH NEXT X ROWS ONLY, I am only given back X rows, so I don't know what my total record set is and how to calculate my min and max pages. The only way I can tell of doing this is calling the function twice and doing a count of rows on the first, then running the second with FETCH NEXT. Is there a better way that won't have me running the query twice? I am trying to speed up performance, not slow it down.

4 Answers 4

159

I encountered some performance issues using the COUNT() OVER() method. (I'm not sure if it was the server as it took 40 seconds to return 10 records and then later didn't have any issues.) This technique worked under all conditions without having to use COUNT() OVER() and accomplishes the same thing:

DECLARE 
    @PageSize INT = 10, 
    @PageNum  INT = 1;

WITH TempResult AS(
    SELECT ID, Name
    FROM Table
), TempCount AS (
    SELECT COUNT(*) AS MaxRows FROM TempResult
)
SELECT *
FROM TempResult, TempCount
ORDER BY TempResult.Name
    OFFSET (@PageNum-1)*@PageSize ROWS
    FETCH NEXT @PageSize ROWS ONLY
11
  • 40
    It would be really awesome if there was a possibility to save COUNT(*) value to a variable. I would be able to set it as an OUTPUT parameter of my Stored Procedure. Any ideas?
    – To Ka
    Mar 27, 2014 at 10:38
  • 1
    Is there any way to get the count in a separate table? It seems like you can only use "TempResult" for the first preceding SELECT statement. Oct 22, 2014 at 17:20
  • 4
    Why does this work so well? In the first CTE, all the rows are selected, then pared down by the fetch. I would have guessed that selecting all the row in the first CTE would slow things down significantly. In any case, thanks for this!
    – jbd
    Apr 28, 2016 at 19:34
  • 1
    in my case it slowed down than COUNT(1) OVER().. maybe because a function in the select.
    – Tiju John
    Dec 22, 2016 at 9:53
  • 2
    This works perfect for small database when rows are millions it take too much time.
    – Kiya
    Nov 1, 2019 at 11:37
131

You can use COUNT(*) OVER() ... here is a quick example using sys.all_objects:

DECLARE 
  @PageSize INT = 10, 
  @PageNum  INT = 1;

SELECT 
  name, object_id, 
  overall_count = COUNT(*) OVER()
FROM sys.all_objects
ORDER BY name
  OFFSET (@PageNum-1)*@PageSize ROWS
  FETCH NEXT @PageSize ROWS ONLY;

However, this should be reserved for small data sets; on larger sets, the performance can be abysmal. See this Paul White article for better alternatives, including maintaining indexed views (which only works if the result is unfiltered or you know WHERE clauses in advance) and using ROW_NUMBER() tricks.

10
  • 47
    In a table with 3,500,000 records, the COUNT(*) OVER() took 1 minute and 3 seconds. The approach described below by James Moberg took 13 seconds to retrieve the same data-set. I'm sure the Count Over approach works fine for smaller data-sets, but when you start getting really large it slows down considerably. Oct 21, 2014 at 16:55
  • Or you could just use COUNT(1) OVER() which is a helluvalot faster since it doesn't have to read the actual data from the table, like count(*) does
    – ldx
    Jun 11, 2015 at 9:44
  • 2
    @AaronBertrand Really? that must mean that you either have an index that includes all columns, or that this has been improved a lot since 2008R2. In that version, the count(*) works sequentially, meaning that first * (as in: all columns) is selected, then counted. If you did a count(1), you just select a constant, which is a lot faster than reading the actual data.
    – ldx
    Aug 4, 2015 at 7:50
  • 6
    @idx No, that's not how that worked in 2008 R2 either, sorry. I've been using SQL Server since 6.5 and I don't recall a time when the engine wasn't smart enough to just scan the narrowest index for both COUNT(*) or COUNT(1). Certainly not since 2000. But hey, I have an instance of 2008 R2, can you set up a repro on SQLfiddle that demonstrates this difference you claim exists? I'm happy to try it. Aug 4, 2015 at 11:26
  • 3
    on a sql server 2016 database, searching on a table with about 25 millions rows, paging over about 3000 results (with several joins, including to a table-valued function), this took milliseconds - awesome!
    – jkerak
    May 18, 2017 at 20:02
3

Apparently results can vary vastly depending on the query. I tested my case with these results: (8 joins, 2 sub queries, 5800 rows in distinct result, 5900 non-distinct):

  • ~0.820 sec using COUNT(1) OVER() (Aaron Bertrand's answer, but with wrong results*)
  • ~0.850 sec using #TEMP table.
  • ~1.590 sec WITH .. AS (James Moberg's anser)
  • ~1.600 sec running twice (first time without ordering, just to count)

*In my case Aaron Bertrand's answer did not work out because COUNT(1) OVER() seems to include the rows filtered out by DISTINCT.

Using a temp table:

DECLARE 
  @PageSize INT = 10, 
  @PageNum  INT = 1;
 
SELECT
  name, object_id
INTO #MY_TEMP
FROM sys.all_objects

SELECT *
FROM #MY_TEMP
ORDER BY name
  OFFSET (@PageNum-1)*@PageSize ROWS
  FETCH NEXT @PageSize ROWS ONLY;

SELECT COUNT(1) FROM #MY_TEMP
-- or
-- SELECT @MY_OUTPUT_PARAM = COUNT(1) FROM #MY_TEMP

DROP TABLE #MY_TEMP

Nice thing about the temp table is that the count can be separated into a different result or output parameter.

1

Based on James Moberg's answer:

This is an alternative using Row_Number(), if you don't have SQL server 2012 and you can't use OFFSET

DECLARE 
    @PageNumEnd INT = 10, 
    @PageNum  INT = 1;

WITH TempResult AS(
    SELECT ID, NAME
    FROM Tabla
), TempCount AS (
    SELECT COUNT(*) AS MaxRows FROM TempResult
)

select * 
from
(
    SELECT
     ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY PolizaId DESC) AS 'NumeroRenglon', 
     MaxRows, 
     ID,
     Name
    FROM TempResult, TempCount

)resultados
WHERE   NumeroRenglon >= @PageNum
    AND NumeroRenglon <= @PageNumEnd
ORDER BY NumeroRenglon

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